Union Station – A Magnificent Example of Beaux-Arts Architecture

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May 11, 1922 - Looking southeast towards the north facade of Union Station on Front St W
May 11, 1922 – Looking southeast towards the north facade of Union Station on Front St W (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1548, Series 393, Item 17357-1)

Union Station is located at ‪65-71 Front St W, bound by Bay St and York St, in downtown Toronto.

Previous Union Stations

The city’s previous two Union Stations were also located on the south side of Front St W; however, they were between York and Simcoe Streets and faced the water. The first existed from 1858 to 1873. The second opened in 1873, underwent an expansion in the mid-1890s, and by 1911, an average of 40,000 passengers were travelling through the station each day. When the present-day Union Station opened in 1927, the previous station was shut down and was later demolished.

The Architecture of Toronto’s Beautiful Train Station

The station was a shared terminal of the Canadian Pacific Railway and Grand Trunk Railway. The architects who designed the sweeping Beaux-Arts style gem included Montreal-based Ross & MacDonald as well as Hugh Jones and John Lyle. Planners turned the entrance of the present-day station towards the city since the downtown was growing. Construction of what is considered one of Canada’s finest examples of classical Beaux-Arts architecture began in 1915. However, due to a shortage of materials and World War I, the station didn’t officially open for another 12 years.

On August 6, 1927, His Royal Highness Edward, the Prince of Wales, cut the ribbon to officially open Toronto’s third Union Station. Many dignitaries were in attendance, including Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King, the Duke and Duchess of York and British Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin.

2021 - The Great Hall and its grand coffered ceilings inside Toronto's Union Station
2021 – The Great Hall and its grand coffered ceilings inside Toronto’s Union Station

The exterior is clad with Queenston and Indiana limestone, rising the equivalent of 7 stories from the base. A hipped roof in the centre block covers a raised attic. The main entrances are behind 22 limestone columns, each of which is 12 m or 40 ft high and weighs 75 tons. The adjoining wings have flat-headed windows decreasing in height each storey. The end pavilions have hipped roofs and oversized round-arched entrances.

On the interior, the Great Hall features vaulted, tiled and coffered ceilings, Tennesee marble floors, substantial round-arched openings and inscribed on the walls are the names of the cities once serviced by the railways. There are stairs and a ramp leading to the concourses and subway.

Throughout the building, there are original finishes, fixtures and hardware.

Heritage Status & Union Station Today

After 1926 - Looking southwest from Front St W towards giant columns at the main entryway of Union Station
After 1926 – Looking southwest from Front St W towards giant columns at the main entryway of Union Station (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 5045)

This iconic jewel became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1975. Since the city acquired Union Station in 2000, they have been responsible for managing and improving the property.

On a regular day, over 300,000 people pass through Union Station to commute on GO trains, buses, TTC subway and UP Express.

Other features inside Union Station include the now glass-covered moat (completed in 2019), the beautiful West Wing waiting area with the oversized skylight, the SkyWalk, shops, food vendors and more.

Transit Options at Toronto’s Union Station

Union Station is a major transportation hub that provides access to a variety of transit options, such as rail (GO Transit, UP Express, VIA Rail, Amtrak, Ontario Northland) as well as bus, subway, and streetcar lines (TTC, GO Bus). The station connects passengers with their desired destinations across the city and province, including Toronto Pearson Airport.

Did You Know?

  • Several films and TV series have been shot at Union Station, including The Last Detail (1973), Silver Streak (1976), Wonderfalls (episode: Wound-Up Penguin, 2004), Cinderella Man (2005), Grey Gardens (2009) and Suits (episode: Rewind, 2012).
  • Union Station’s architectural design blends seamlessly with the neighbouring Beaux-Arts-style Royal York Hotel and the Dominion Public Building.
  • In 1961, Union Station became the first railway station in Ontario where liquor could be served. The 80-seat lounge, which had opened the year prior, was initially called the York Pioneer Room.
  • In the Great Fire of Toronto 1904, the block of Front St W between Bay St and York St, which is now the location of Union Station, was almost entirely destroyed.
  • When Toronto’s previous (second) Union Station closed, its clock, which had been operating for over 50 years, was removed and installed in Huntsville’s Town Hall tower. To this day, the historic 200-year-old timepiece is still ticking and continues to serve the Huntsville community. Huntsville, Ontario, is about 225 km north of Toronto.
  • The first passenger train departure in Upper Canada took place on May 16, 1853. The train left from a wooden shed that was located across from Sword’s Hotel (where the Royal York Hotel stands today) on Front St.
  • Why do so many Canadian and American cities have a Union Station? They were named so because that’s where two or more railway company lines met and shared facilities. In the case of Toronto’s first Union Station, it was made for the Grand Trunk, Great Western and Northern railways. The present-day Union Station was a collaborative effort between the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Grand Trunk Railway (now known as the Canadian National Railway).

Union Station Photos

2022 - Looking southeast towards Union Station from Front St W and York St in downtown Toronto
2022 – Looking southeast towards Union Station from Front St W and York St in downtown Toronto
May 11, 1922 - Looking southeast towards the north facade of Union Station on Front St W from York St
May 11, 1922 – Looking southeast towards the north facade of Union Station on Front St W from York St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1548, Series 393, Item 17357-1)
2020 - The giant columns along the main facade of Toronto's Union Station. Behind the Doric colonnade are the principal entrances to the station
2020 – The giant columns along the main facade of Toronto’s Union Station. Behind the Doric colonnade are the principal entrances to the station
October 21, 1915 - Looking northeast towards the excavation for Union Station with Queen's Hotel, the site of the future Royal York Hotel in the background. The Royal York Hotel was completed in 1929
October 21, 1915 – Looking northeast towards the excavation for Union Station with Queen’s Hotel, the site of the future Royal York Hotel in the background. The Royal York Hotel was completed in 1929 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 1108)
1915 - Looking northeast during the excavation for Union Station. In the background is the Queen's Hotel. It was demolished in 1927 to make way for the Royal York Hotel
1915 – Looking northeast during the excavation for Union Station. In the background is the Queen’s Hotel. It was demolished in 1927 to make way for the Royal York Hotel (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 30, Item 64)
March 3, 1916 - An aerial view looking southwest toward the new site of the Union Station with the previous (second) Union Station in the background
March 3, 1916 – An aerial view looking southwest toward the new site of the Union Station with the previous (second) Union Station in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1172, Series 1022, Item 94)
May 31, 1916 - An aerial view looking southwest from Front St W, just east of Bay St. The photo shows the construction of the structural steel framing of Union Station with the previous (second) Union Station in the background
May 31, 1916 – An aerial view looking southwest from Front St W, just east of Bay St. The photo shows the construction of the structural steel framing of Union Station with the previous (second) Union Station in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1172, Series 1022, Item 87)
July 31, 1917 – An aerial view looking southeast from Front St W and York St towards the construction progress of Union Station
July 31, 1917 – An aerial view looking southeast from Front St W and York St towards the construction progress of Union Station (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1172, Series 1022, Item 59)
July 4, 1918 - Looking southwest toward the construction progress showing the north-facing side of the exterior of Union Station from a high vantage point
July 4, 1918 – Looking southwest toward the construction progress showing the north-facing side of the exterior of Union Station from a high vantage point (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1172, Series 1022, Item 36)
October 18, 1918 – Construction progress showing the north-facing side of the exterior of Union Station. Its impressive facade stretches 229 m or 752 ft along Front St W, between Bay St and York St
October 18, 1918 – Construction progress showing the north-facing side of the exterior of Union Station. Its impressive facade stretches 229 m or 752 ft along Front St W, between Bay St and York St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1172, Series 1022, Item 34)
July 17, 1919 -  Looking east along Front St W from west of York St. Notice the streetcar track that once ran along Front St, and on the right, the not–quite–complete Union Station
July 17, 1919 – Looking east along Front St W from west of York St. Notice the streetcar track that once ran along Front St, and on the right, the not–quite–complete Union Station (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 477)
After 1926 - Looking southwest from Front St W towards giant columns at the main entryway of Union Station
After 1926 – Looking southwest from Front St W towards giant columns at the main entryway of Union Station (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 5045)
Circa 1927 – An aerial view looking east along Front St W from York St with Queens Hotel, the future site of the Royal York Hotel on the left and Union Station on the right
Circa 1927 – An aerial view looking east along Front St W from York St with Queens Hotel, the future site of the Royal York Hotel on the left and Union Station on the right (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 1006)
January 21, 2024 – The photo captures a few iconic city landmarks, including a portion of the Dominion Public Building on the left, Union Station in the centre, and the CN Tower in the background
January 21, 2024 – The photo captures a few iconic city landmarks, including a portion of the Dominion Public Building on the left, Union Station in the centre, and the CN Tower in the background
July 11, 1930 - Looking southwest from Front St W just east of Bay St towards a traffic jam and Union Station. Notice city’s previous Union Station (with the tower) is also visible in the distance
July 11, 1930 – Looking southwest from Front St W just east of Bay St towards a traffic jam and Union Station. Notice city’s previous Union Station (with the tower) is also visible in the distance (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 21093)
December 25, 2023 - Looking southwest towards Union Station from Bay St and Front St W. Notice fog has hidden the CN Tower, which would usually be visible in the background on the right
December 25, 2023 – Looking southwest towards Union Station from Bay St and Front St W. Notice fog has hidden the CN Tower, which would usually be visible in the background on the right
February 18, 2024 – Looking southwest toward the Union Station and the CN Tower
February 18, 2024 – Looking southwest toward the Union Station and the CN Tower
March 26, 1931 - Looking east along Front St W with Union Station on the right and the Royal York Hotel on the left. Notice the vehicle traffic in the moat in front of Union Station. In 2019, this area reopened as a glass-roofed pedestrian walkwa
March 26, 1931 – Looking east along Front St W with Union Station on the right and the Royal York Hotel on the left. Notice the vehicle traffic in the moat in front of Union Station. In 2019, this area reopened as a glass-roofed pedestrian walkway (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 8455)
February 3, 2024 - Looking west over the glass-topped pedestrian walkway in front of Toronto's Union Station. It was covered in 2019 and was originally a moat for automobile traffic
February 3, 2024 – Looking west over the glass-topped pedestrian walkway in front of Toronto’s Union Station. It was covered in 2019 and was originally a moat for automobile traffic
February 3, 2024 - Union Station's glass-topped pedestrian walkway was unveiled in 2019. It was originally a moat for automobile traffic
February 3, 2024 – Union Station’s glass-topped pedestrian walkway was unveiled in 2019. It was originally a moat for automobile traffic
August 5, 1932 - Passengers exiting a TTC streetcar in front of Union Station on Front St W
August 5, 1932 – Passengers exiting a TTC streetcar in front of Union Station on Front St W (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9358)
January 21, 2024 – Looking southeast towards Union Station at ‪65-71 Front St W, between Bay St and York St, in downtown Toronto
January 21, 2024 – Looking southeast towards Union Station at ‪65-71 Front St W, between Bay St and York St, in downtown Toronto
May 22, 1939 – Union Station decorated for the royal tour of Canada by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth
May 22, 1939 – Union Station decorated for the royal tour of Canada by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (City of Toronto Archives)
December 9, 1949 - An aerial view looking east along Front St W from York St, with the Royal York Hotel on the left and Union Station on the right. The photo shows vehicle traffic in the moat in front of Union Station. In 2019 this area reopened as a glass-roofed underground pedestrian walkway
December 9, 1949 – An aerial view looking east along Front St W from York St, with the Royal York Hotel on the left and Union Station on the right. The photo shows vehicle traffic in the moat in front of Union Station. In 2019 this area reopened as a glass-roofed underground pedestrian walkway (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1567, Series 577, Item 19)
February 10, 2024 - Looking east over the glass-topped pedestrian walkway in front of Toronto's Union Station. It was covered in 2019 and was originally a moat for automobile traffic
February 10, 2024 – Looking east over the glass-topped pedestrian walkway in front of Toronto’s Union Station. It was covered in 2019 and was originally a moat for automobile traffic
May 1971 - Looking southeast towards Union Station from Front St W and York St/University Ave. The magnificent Beaux-Arts-style building was designed by the Montreal architectural firm of Ross & Macdonald, CPR's architect Hugh Jones and Toronto-based architect John Lyle
May 1971 – Looking southeast towards Union Station from Front St W and York St/University Ave. The magnificent Beaux-Arts-style building was designed by the Montreal architectural firm of Ross & Macdonald, CPR’s architect Hugh Jones and Toronto-based architect John Lyle (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 2, Item ID 116)
January 21, 2024 – Looking southeast towards Union Station from Front St W and York St/University Ave in downtown Toronto
January 21, 2024 – Looking southeast towards Union Station from Front St W and York St/University Ave in downtown Toronto
December 24, 2023 - Looking southwest towards Union Station from Bay St and Front St W. Notice the CN Tower, partially hidden by fog, in the background
December 24, 2023 – Looking southwest towards Union Station from Bay St and Front St W. Notice the CN Tower, partially hidden by fog, in the background
May 1971 - Looking southeast towards Union Station on Front St W. Notice the sign for the York Pioneer Tavern on the right. The 80-seat lounge opened in 1960, and the following year, it became the first railway station lounge in Ontario to serve liquor
May 1971 – Looking southeast towards Union Station on Front St W. Notice the sign for the York Pioneer Tavern on the right. The 80-seat lounge opened in 1960, and the following year, it became the first railway station lounge in Ontario to serve liquor (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 2, ID 117)
January 21, 2024 – Behind the 22 limestone columns are the entrances to Union Station
January 21, 2024 – Behind the 22 limestone columns are the entrances to Union Station
June 12, 1974 - The Union Station clock with the Royal York Hotel in the background
June 12, 1974 – The Union Station clock with the Royal York Hotel in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 37, Item 13)
January 21, 2024 – The Union Station clock on Front St W with the Royal York Hotel in the background, between Bay St and York St, in downtown Toronto. The clock was restored in 2015
January 21, 2024 – The Union Station clock on Front St W with the Royal York Hotel in the background, between Bay St and York St, in downtown Toronto. The clock was restored in 2015
Between 1978 and 1986 - The clock and columns at Toronto's Union Station on Front St W. Each column weighs 75 tons and is 12 m or 40 ft in height
Between 1978 and 1986 – The clock and columns at Toronto’s Union Station on Front St W. Each column weighs 75 tons and is 12 m or 40 ft in height (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 750, Item 2)
Between 1980 and 1986 – Looking southwest towards Union Station from Front St W at Bay St. Notice the concrete base of the CN Tower in the background
Between 1980 and 1986 – Looking southwest towards Union Station from Front St W at Bay St. Notice the concrete base of the CN Tower in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 1465, File 355, Item 32)
Between 1982 and 1992 - Looking east from Front St W and York St/University Ave towards Union Station on the right and the Royal York Hotel on the left
Between 1982 and 1992 – Looking east from Front St W and York St/University Ave towards Union Station on the right and the Royal York Hotel on the left (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 1465, File 522, Item 28)
December 24, 2023 - An aerial view looking southeast towards Union Station from the 11th floor of the Fairmont Royal York Hotel on Front St W in Toronto
December 24, 2023 – An aerial view looking southeast towards Union Station from the 11th floor of the Fairmont Royal York Hotel on Front St W in Toronto
1986 - An aerial view looking northwest towards Union Station and Royal York Hotel on Front St W, between Bay St and York St. Union Station opened in 1927, and the Royal York Hotel opened two years later
1986 – An aerial view looking northwest towards Union Station and Royal York Hotel on Front St W, between Bay St and York St. Union Station opened in 1927, and the Royal York Hotel opened two years later (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 1465, File 401, Item 4)
2021 - The Great Hall and its grand coffered ceilings inside Toronto's Union Station
2021 – The Great Hall and its grand coffered ceilings inside Toronto’s Union Station
March 8, 1923 - Stairway to the TTC subway and ticket wickets in the lobby of The Great Hall at Union Station
March 8, 1923 – Stairway to the TTC subway and ticket wickets in the lobby of The Great Hall at Union Station (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1548, Series 393, Item 1803a)
2020 - VIA Concourse Hall and entrance to the trains inside Union Station
2020 – VIA Concourse Hall and entrance to the trains inside Union Station
March 8, 1923 - Ticket wickets in the lobby of the Great Hall in Union Station
March 8, 1923 – Ticket wickets in the lobby of the Great Hall in Union Station (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1548, Series 393, Item 1813b)
Between 1978 and 1986 – Looking east inside The Great Hall at Toronto's Union Station
Between 1978 and 1986 – Looking east inside The Great Hall at Toronto’s Union Station (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 750, Item 5)
2020 - The large arched window opening on the east side of Union Station's Great Hall
2020 – The large arched window opening on the east side of Union Station’s Great Hall
2021 - Looking towards the Great Hall inside Union Station
2021 – Looking towards the Great Hall inside Union Station
February 18, 2024 – An evening photo of the entrance to the VIA Concourse Hall trains at Union Station
February 18, 2024 – An evening photo of the entrance to the VIA Concourse Hall trains at Union Station
2020 - One of two main north entrances inside Union Station
2020 – One of two main north entrances inside Union Station
2021 - The VIA Concourse at Toronto's Union Station
2021 – The VIA Concourse at Toronto’s Union Station
2021 - A doorway in a corridor of Union Station
2021 – A doorway in a corridor of Union Station
June 13, 1923 - Waiting room on the ground floor of the west wing in Union Station
June 13, 1923 – Waiting room on the ground floor of the west wing in Union Station (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 906)
February 10, 2024 - The waiting room and oversized skylight on the ground floor of the west wing in Union Station
February 10, 2024 – The waiting room and oversized skylight on the ground floor of the west wing in Union Station
2021 - A phone booth and seating inside Union Station
2021 – A phone booth and seating inside Union Station
2022 - A vintage sign pointing riders at Union Station to "Please use centre entrances for passenger trains"
2022 – A vintage sign pointing riders at Union Station to “Please use centre entrances for passenger trains”
2021 – The plaque reads:

“The tablet commemorates those in the service of the Canadian Pacific Railway company who at the call of King and Country left all that was dear to them, endured hardship, faced danger and finally passed out of sight of men by the path of duty and self sacrifice, giving up their own lives that others might live in freedom. Let those who come after see to it that their names be not forgotten.”

The World War 1 Commemoration plaque located in Union Station
2021 – The plaque reads:

“The tablet commemorates those in the service of the Canadian Pacific Railway company who at the call of King and Country left all that was dear to them, endured hardship, faced danger and finally passed out of sight of men by the path of duty and self sacrifice, giving up their own lives that others might live in freedom. Let those who come after see to it that their names be not forgotten.”

The World War 1 Commemoration plaque located in Union Station
2020 – Notice the clock numbers have been replaced with the twelve letters “UNION STATION.” The plaza clock was restored in 2015
2020 – Notice the clock numbers have been replaced with the twelve letters “UNION STATION.” The plaza clock was restored in 2015
2020 – Looking southwest towards Union Station with the CN Tower in the background. Construction on the began in 1915; however, it didn't open until 1927
2020 – Looking southwest towards Union Station with the CN Tower in the background. Construction on the station began in 1915; however, it didn’t open until 1927
2023 - The heritage plaque reads:

Union Station

"This station was built between 1915 and 1920 to the designs of Ross and Macdonald, H.G. Jones and J.M. Lyle. Subsequent to the relocation of the tracks, it was opened in 1927. It is the finest example in Canada of stations erected in the classical Beaux-Arts style during an era of expanding national rail networks and vigorous urban growth. Its sweeping façade and imposing Great Hall exhibit the monumental architecture and dramatic use of enclosed space characteristic of the Beaux-Arts movement."

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.
Government of Canada
2023 – The heritage plaque reads:

Union Station

“This station was built between 1915 and 1920 to the designs of Ross and Macdonald, H.G. Jones and J.M. Lyle. Subsequent to the relocation of the tracks, it was opened in 1927. It is the finest example in Canada of stations erected in the classical Beaux-Arts style during an era of expanding national rail networks and vigorous urban growth. Its sweeping façade and imposing Great Hall exhibit the monumental architecture and dramatic use of enclosed space characteristic of the Beaux-Arts movement.”

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Government of Canada
2023 - The plaque reads:

Via Rail Canada
April 23, 1999

“The quick actions of VIA Rail engineers Don Blain, 45, and Kevin Lihou, 33, just moments before the derailment of their train, VIA 74, were instrumental in avoiding the potential death and/or injury to nearly 300 people in two passenger trains. Engineers Blane and Lihou acted heroically while disregarding their personal safety. In seconds, they recognized an improperly set switch, applied the brakes on their train, shut off the engine, thereby removing an ignition source and radioed a warning to other approaching VIA train. Don Blane and Kevin Lihou died in the derailment and collision on April 23, 1999. Their courageous actions on that date are recognized and commemorated by this plaque.”
2023 – The plaque reads:

Via Rail Canada
April 23, 1999

“The quick actions of VIA Rail engineers Don Blain, 45, and Kevin Lihou, 33, just moments before the derailment of their train, VIA 74, were instrumental in avoiding the potential death and/or injury to nearly 300 people in two passenger trains. Engineers Blane and Lihou acted heroically while disregarding their personal safety. In seconds, they recognized an improperly set switch, applied the brakes on their train, shut off the engine, thereby removing an ignition source and radioed a warning to other approaching VIA train. Don Blane and Kevin Lihou died in the derailment and collision on April 23, 1999. Their courageous actions on that date are recognized and commemorated by this plaque.”
1873 - Looking northwest towards the previous (second) Union Station, the year it opened on Front St W, between York St and Simcoe St. Notice the railway lines and previous station was once at the edge of Lake Ontario before a massive land-filling project. In today's terms, this would be just north of Bremner Blvd
1873 – Looking northwest towards the previous (second) Union Station, the year it opened on Front St W, between York St and Simcoe St. Notice the railway lines and previous station was once at the edge of Lake Ontario before a massive land-filling project. In today’s terms, this would be just north of Bremner Blvd (Toronto Public Library e1-24c)
Circa 1893 - An architectural sketch of Toronto's second Union Station. The station was located on the south side of Front St W, between York St and Lower Simcoe St. It was built in 1873 and demolished in 1927 when the present-day Union Station opened
Circa 1893 – An architectural sketch of Toronto’s second Union Station. The station was located on the south side of Front St W, between York St and Lower Simcoe St. It was built in 1873 and demolished in 1927 when the present-day Union Station opened (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 1465, File 59, Item 89)
1907 - Looking east towards the platform and tracks of the city's previous (second) Union Station, once located on Front St W, between York St and Simcoe St
1907 – Looking east towards the platform and tracks of the city’s previous (second) Union Station, once located on Front St W, between York St and Simcoe St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 99)
1908 – Looking southeast on Front St W, east of Simcoe St, towards the entrance and tower of Toronto's previous Union Station. This portion of the old Union Station was an extension added between 1893 and 1895. It joined the original portion of this station that was built in 1872/73 to Front St W. This Union Station closed in 1927 when the present-day Union Station opened
1908 – Looking southeast on Front St W, east of Simcoe St, towards the entrance and tower of Toronto’s previous Union Station. This portion of the old Union Station was an extension added between 1893 and 1895. It joined the original portion of this station that was built in 1872/73 to Front St W. This Union Station closed in 1927 when the present-day Union Station opened (Toronto Public Library R-2394)
Circa 1911 - British immigrants standing on the Bridge of Sighs from the previous (second) Union Station. Notice the advertising for the Daly House in the upper right corner
Circa 1911 – British immigrants standing on the Bridge of Sighs from the previous (second) Union Station. Notice the advertising for the Daly House in the upper right corner (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 102)
Between 1915 and 1916 - The 180th Battalion leaving from Toronto's second Union Station
Between 1915 and 1916 – The 180th Battalion leaving from Toronto’s second Union Station (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 821)
Circa 1916 - Looking northwest towards the previous (second) Union Station from York St, south of Front St W. The old station had several waiting rooms, baggage areas and washrooms, along with a shopping arcade and a restaurant
Circa 1916 – Looking northwest towards the previous (second) Union Station from York St, south of Front St W. The old station had several waiting rooms, baggage areas and washrooms, along with a shopping arcade and a restaurant (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 5044)
1923 – A group of men on the platform of Toronto's second Union Station (1873-1927)
1923 – A group of men on the platform of Toronto’s second Union Station (1873-1927) (Toronto Public Library X65-85)
1927 - Looking northwest towards the clock tower of the city's previous Union Station. The plaque shows E. P. Hannaford was the building's engineer, while John Shedden was the builder in 1872. This photo was taken the year the station was taken out of service, the same year that the present-day Union Station opened. Notice the clock is missing from the tower. It was removed and installed in Huntsville, Ontario's Town Hall tower and remains there to this day
1927 – Looking northwest towards the clock tower of the city’s previous Union Station. The plaque shows E. P. Hannaford was the building’s engineer, while John Shedden was the builder in 1872. This photo was taken the year the station was taken out of service, the same year that the present-day Union Station opened. Notice the clock is missing from the tower. It was removed and installed in Huntsville, Ontario’s Town Hall tower and remains there to this day (Toronto Public Library TSPA_0114603F)
2023 – Since 1927, when Toronto's previous (second) Union Station was demolished, its 50+ year old clock was removed and installed in the tower of Huntsville's Town Hall at 37 Main St E. To this day, the historic 200-year-old timepiece is still ticking and continues to serve the Huntsville, Ontario community
2023 – Since 1927, when Toronto’s previous (second) Union Station was demolished, its 50+ year old clock was removed and installed in the tower of Huntsville’s Town Hall at 37 Main St E. To this day, the historic 200-year-old timepiece is still ticking and continues to serve the Huntsville, Ontario community (Google Maps)
1800s - Sketch of the first Union Station/The Old Grand Trunk Railway Depot. It was located just south of Front St W (near Station St) and on the east side of York St. It was in use from 1858 until 1873
1800s – Sketch of the first Union Station/The Old Grand Trunk Railway Depot. It was located just south of Front St W (near Station St) and on the east side of York St. It was in use from 1858 until 1873 (Landmarks of Toronto Volume 1 by J Ross Robertson – 1894)
1953 - The plaque reads:
“At this place on May 16 1853 the first train in Ontario hauled by a steam Locomotive started and ran to Aurora.”
1953 – The plaque reads: “At this place on May 16 1853 the first train in Ontario hauled by a steam Locomotive started and ran to Aurora.” (Toronto Public Library R-2210)
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