Toronto Coach Terminal – The Old Bay Street Bus Station

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April 28, 1932 - The Toronto Coach Terminal at the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Notice the Gray Coach Lines (a TTC subsidiary) sign and the original four departure bays
April 28, 1932 – The Toronto Coach Terminal at the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9217)

The former Toronto Coach Terminal is located at 610 Bay St (at Edward St on the southwest corner) in downtown Toronto.

The Earlier Open-Air Bus Terminal

In 1928, the Toronto Transit Commission purchased land on the south side of Edward St between Bay St and Elizabeth St. An open-air motor coach terminal was established on the site for Gray Coach Lines, a TTC subsidiary.

Travel by bus quickly became very popular, and the outdoor terminal could not adequately handle the number of passengers.

The Toronto Coach Terminal

2020 – Looking up the staircase that leads to the mezzanine gallery at the Toronto Coach Terminal. Notice the arched stained glass window centrepiece at the stairs landing, the light fixtures and the ceiling light
2020 – Looking up the staircase that leads to the mezzanine gallery at the Toronto Coach Terminal

In July 1931, construction began on the Toronto Coach Terminal. Architect Charles B Dolphin designed the Art-Deco-style structure. Clad with Queenston limestone, the two-storey terminal building faces Bay St. Behind it, along Edward St, is a covered, one-storey departure area that initially had four bays.

The terminal opened on December 19, 1931. At the opening ceremonies, officials included Mayor William Stewart, TTC Chairman William McBrien, and Minister of Highways, Honorable Leopold Mccaulay. The Attorney-General of Ontario, William Price, cut the silk ribbon, officially dispatching the first bus from the Bay St terminal heading to Hamilton. A luncheon followed on the roof garden at the Royal York Hotel.

Inside the terminal building, the walls are finished in creamy white stone tiles (Roman travertine), and the coved ceiling features a large blue and green glass ceiling light with bold geometric shapes. The staircase that leads to the mezzanine gallery has an arched stained glass window as its centrepiece. The beautiful light fixtures are made from ivory glass and aluminum.

The waiting room, which extended the entire building length, featured route maps. There were ticket and information counters, a baggage room, a drug store, a newsstand, a cigar store, restrooms, offices and a dispatcher’s desk.

Originally, when buses arrived, they entered from Elizabeth St and dropped off passengers under a platform covered by a canopy. The coaches then proceeded to pick up passengers in the covered loading bays then exit onto Edward St for departure. There was a small inspection building for servicing buses and an area for gas, oil, water and air at the southeast corner of Elizabeth St and Edwards St.

The Toronto Coach Terminal was the first structure in Canada designed and built exclusively for interurban (operating between two or more cities or towns) motor coach travellers.

The Progress of Rubber-Tired Transportation

When it first opened, the terminal saw an average of 130 coaches and 2,500 passengers each day. Bus lines that ran out of the terminal included Grey Coach Lines, Toronto Greyhound Line, Collacutt Lines, Colonial Coach Lines and Toronto Bus Lines.

The numbers continually increased, so the terminal was gradually expanded to meet the demands. By the late-1950s, there were 400 bus arrivals and departures daily, and there were now nine bays (increased in two phases). During this decade, the TTC had also acquired the site across the street from the main terminal – the stretch of Edward St on the south side, from Elizabeth St to Chestnut St to use as a bus parking lot.

Converting the Bus Parking Lot into a Terminal

In 1968, a terminal annex was built on the bus parking lot site to relieve congestion from the main depot. The Elizabeth St Terminal had a spacious waiting area, a ticket counter, a coffee bar and restrooms. It was later partially covered to help protect passengers from inclement weather.

By the mid-1970s, an average of more than 13,000 people were passing through the Toronto Coach Terminal and the annex every day.

Closure of the Terminal & Future Plans

2021 – The former Toronto Coach Terminal is located on the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St. This photo was taken in July 2021, the month the terminal closed after 90 years of use
2021 – The former Toronto Coach Terminal is located on the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St. This photo was taken in July 2021, the month the terminal closed after 90 years of use

Over the years, the buildings had fallen into disrepair, and with the Union Station Bus Terminal (USBT) opening at CIBC Square in December 2020, the Bay St Terminal closed in July 2021. It was in operation for 90 years.

ModernTO (a program adopted by Toronto City Council designed to modernize the city’s office space, strategically use its real estate holdings and save money) has plans to redevelop the combined 1.26 acres of property at 610 Bay St and 130 Elizabeth St. This includes the preservation and adaptive reuse of the former Toronto Coach Terminal building. Other visions for the site also include a mixed-use, high-rise residential development with a combination of market and affordable units, a new Toronto Paramedic Services hub, commercial space and employment use targeted for the medical sciences and healthcare sectors.

Did You Know?

  • During his summer vacation, Charles Dolphin, the building’s architect, designed a cardboard model of the terminal building and nine to-scale wooden coaches to verify the buses’ parking, turning and movement. Mr Dolphin carved the wooden buses while fishing on Clear Lake with his canoe as his workshop. The model was on display at the 1931 Canadian National Exhibition.
  • Charles Dolphin also designed TTC headquarters, the William McBrien Building, at 1900 Yonge St, along with many other buildings in Toronto.
  • Anglin-Norcross Limited constructed the terminal.
  • In the 1970s, for 25¢, you could watch 30 minutes of TV in a booth in the terminal’s mezzanine.
  • In 1987, the building received heritage status from the city.
  • The TTC owned Grey Coach Lines until 1990.

Toronto Coach Terminal Photos

June 10, 1931 – Looking towards the open-air motor coach terminal on the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. The photo was taken just before the construction of the Toronto Coach Terminal on the site. Notice the McKnight Building next to the terminal and in the distance, the top of the Canada Life Building
June 10, 1931 – Looking towards the open-air motor coach terminal on the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. The photo was taken just before the construction of the Toronto Coach Terminal on the site. Notice the McKnight Building next to the terminal and in the distance, the top of the Canada Life Building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 8615)
2023 – Looking southwest towards the former Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Notice the McKnight Building next to the terminal
2023 – Looking southwest towards the former Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Notice the McKnight Building next to the terminal
June 10, 1931 – Looking southwest toward the open-air bus terminal at Bay St and Edward St. The outdoor terminal could not adequately handle the number of passengers, so construction soon began on the Toronto Coach Terminal, completed in December 1931
June 10, 1931 – Looking southwest toward the open-air bus terminal at Bay St and Edward St. The outdoor terminal could not adequately handle the number of passengers, so construction soon began on the Toronto Coach Terminal, completed in December 1931 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 8614)
September 13, 1931 - A Gray Coach Lines exhibit of Toronto Coach Terminal at the Canadian National Exhibition. Charles B Dolphin, the building’s architect, designed a cardboard model of the terminal building and nine to-scale wooden coaches to verify the buses’ parking, turning and movement
September 13, 1931 – A Gray Coach Lines exhibit of Toronto Coach Terminal at the Canadian National Exhibition. Charles B Dolphin, the building’s architect, designed a cardboard model of the terminal building and nine to-scale wooden coaches to verify the buses’ parking, turning and movement (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 8868)
September 17, 1931 - The sign at the construction site of the terminal reads: "Toronto Motor Coach Terminal - Under construction for Toronto Transporation Commission - by Anglin-Norcross Ltd - Ready for occupation December 15th, 1931 for rental of stores and offices - apply Gibson Bros 357 Bay St"
September 17, 1931 – The sign at the construction site of the terminal reads: “Toronto Motor Coach Terminal – Under construction for Toronto Transporation Commission – by Anglin-Norcross Ltd – Ready for occupation December 15th, 1931 for rental of stores and offices – apply Gibson Bros 357 Bay St” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 8882)
September 29, 1931 - Looking southwest toward the construction of the Toronto Motor Coach Terminal at Bay St and Edward St. The contracting, engineering and building company, Anglin-Norcross Limited, constructed the terminal
September 29, 1931 – Looking southwest toward the construction of the Toronto Motor Coach Terminal at Bay St and Edward St. The contracting, engineering and building company, Anglin-Norcross Limited, constructed the terminal (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 8901)
December 19, 1931 – Toronto Mayor William Stewart buying the first ticket issued during the opening of the Toronto Coach Terminal
December 19, 1931 – Toronto Mayor William Stewart buying the first ticket issued during the opening of the Toronto Coach Terminal (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9030)
December 19, 1931 – Attorney-General of Ontario William Price cutting the silk ribbon, officially dispatching the first bus from the Bay St terminal heading to Hamilton. Other officials at the opening ceremonies included Mayor William Stewart, TTC Chairman William McBrien, and Minister of Highways, Honorable Leopold Mccaulay. A luncheon followed on the roof garden at the Royal York Hotel
December 19, 1931 – Attorney-General of Ontario William Price cutting the silk ribbon, officially dispatching the first bus from the Bay St terminal heading to Hamilton. Other officials at the opening ceremonies included Mayor William Stewart, TTC Chairman William McBrien, and Minister of Highways, Honorable Leopold Mccaulay. A luncheon followed on the roof garden at the Royal York Hotel (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9028)
December 19, 1931 – Looking towards the west side of the waiting room in the Toronto Coach Terminal. Notice the wooden benches, arrivals enter through the doors on the left, the stained glass window midway up the staircase and the departures exit through the doors on the right. The photo was taken on opening day
December 19, 1931 – Looking towards the west side of the waiting room in the Toronto Coach Terminal. Notice the wooden benches, arrivals enter through the doors on the left, the stained glass window midway up the staircase and the departures exit through the doors on the right. The photo was taken on opening day (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9032)
2020 – Looking up the staircase that leads to the mezzanine gallery at the Toronto Coach Terminal. Notice the arched stained glass window centrepiece at the stairs landing, the light fixtures and the ceiling light
2020 – Looking up the staircase that leads to the mezzanine gallery at the Toronto Coach Terminal. Notice the arched stained glass window centrepiece at the stairs landing, the light fixtures and the ceiling light
December 19, 1931 – Looking east from the mezzanine of the Toronto Coach Terminal towards the waiting room and Bay St entrance on opening day. Notice the Art-Deco style glass ceiling light and fixtures
December 19, 1931 – Looking east from the mezzanine of the Toronto Coach Terminal towards the waiting room and Bay St entrance on opening day. Notice the Art-Deco style glass ceiling light and fixtures (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9031)
2020 – The coved ceiling at the Toronto Coach Terminal features a large blue and green glass ceiling light with bold geometric shapes
2020 – The coved ceiling at the Toronto Coach Terminal features a large blue and green glass ceiling light with bold geometric shapes
December 19, 1931 – Looking west towards the north mezzanine in the Toronto Coach Terminal on opening day. The walls in the terminal are finished in a creamy white stone tile
December 19, 1931 – Looking west towards the north mezzanine in the Toronto Coach Terminal on opening day. The walls in the terminal are finished in a creamy white stone tile (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9035)
2020 – The arched, Gray Coach Lines stained glass window at the Toronto Coach Terminal
2020 – The arched, Gray Coach Lines stained glass window at the Toronto Coach Terminal
December 19, 1931 – The Parcels Checked and Tickets and Information desks at the Toronto Coach Terminal on opening day
December 19, 1931 – The Parcels Checked and Tickets and Information desks at the Toronto Coach Terminal on opening day (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9033)
December 19, 1931 – On the opening day of the Toronto Coach Terminal at the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. The Art-Deco-style building was designed by architect Charles B Dolphin
December 19, 1931 – On the opening day of the Toronto Coach Terminal at the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. The Art-Deco-style building was designed by architect Charles B Dolphin (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9041)
2023 - ModernTO has plans to preserve and adaptively reuse the former Toronto Coach Terminal building at 610 Bay St. Other visions for the site also include a mixed-use, high-rise residential development with a combination of market and affordable units and a new Toronto Paramedic Services hub
2023 – ModernTO has plans to preserve and adaptively reuse the former Toronto Coach Terminal building at 610 Bay St. Other visions for the site also include a mixed-use, high-rise residential development with a combination of market and affordable units and a new Toronto Paramedic Services hub
December 19, 1931 – Looking southeast toward the original four departure bays at the Toronto Coach Terminal from Edward St, just west of Bay St. Notice Hotel Ford in the background. The photo was taken on opening day
December 19, 1931 – Looking southeast toward the original four departure bays at the Toronto Coach Terminal from Edward St, just west of Bay St. Notice Hotel Ford in the background. The photo was taken on opening day (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9037)
December 19, 1931 – Looking northeast from under the Toronto Coach Terminal's covered departure area. The photo was taken on opening day
December 19, 1931 – Looking northeast from under the Toronto Coach Terminal’s covered departure area. The photo was taken on opening day (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9038)
December 19, 1931 – Looking northwest towards the inspection building and service station for the Toronto Coach Terminal. This building was located a the southeast corner of Elizabeth St and Edward St. The photo was taken on opening day
December 19, 1931 – Looking northwest towards the inspection building and service station for the Toronto Coach Terminal. This building was located a the southeast corner of Elizabeth St and Edward St. The photo was taken on opening day (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9040)
April 28, 1932 - The Toronto Coach Terminal at the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Notice the Gray Coach Lines (a TTC subsidiary) sign and the original four departure bays
April 28, 1932 – The Toronto Coach Terminal at the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Notice the Gray Coach Lines (a TTC subsidiary) sign and the original four departure bays (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9217)
July 2021 – The former Toronto Coach Terminal is located on the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St. This photo was taken the month the terminal closed after 90 years of use
July 2021 – The former Toronto Coach Terminal is located on the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St. This photo was taken the month the terminal closed after 90 years of use
July 22, 1932 – Looking northwest toward the Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Built in 1931, architect Charles B Dolphin designed the building in the Art Deco style
July 22, 1932 – Looking northwest toward the Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Built in 1931, architect Charles B Dolphin designed the building in the Art Deco style (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9307)
2023 – Looking northwest toward the main facade of the former Toronto Coach Terminal at 610 Bay St in downtown Toronto
2023 – Looking northwest toward the main facade of the former Toronto Coach Terminal at 610 Bay St in downtown Toronto
July 22, 1932 – A Grey Coach Bus in the departure area off of Edward St at the Toronto Coach Terminal in downtown Toronto. The bus is heading towards Niagara Falls and Buffalo
July 22, 1932 – A Grey Coach Bus in the departure area off of Edward St at the Toronto Coach Terminal in downtown Toronto. The bus is heading towards Niagara Falls and Buffalo (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9308)
October 5, 1932 – Looking southwest along Bay St from Edward St towards the Toronto Coach Terminal and Dundas St W. Notice "Terminal Drugs" was once located in the building
October 5, 1932 – Looking southwest along Bay St from Edward St towards the Toronto Coach Terminal and Dundas St W. Notice “Terminal Drugs” was once located in the building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9462)
2023 - Looking southwest along Bay St from Edward St towards the former Toronto Coach Terminal with the McKnight Building next to the terminal
2023 – Looking southwest along Bay St from Edward St towards the former Toronto Coach Terminal with the McKnight Building next to the terminal
April 12, 1932 - The drug store and lunch counter at Terminal Drugs inside the Toronto Coach Terminal. It was located in the southeast corner of the building
April 12, 1932 – The drug store and lunch counter at Terminal Drugs inside the Toronto Coach Terminal. It was located in the southeast corner of the building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9231)
Circa 1954 – Looking northwest along Bay St towards the Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Edward St. Notice the large sign out front says "BUS TERMINAL"
Circa 1954 – Looking northwest along Bay St towards the Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Edward St. Notice the large sign out front says “BUS TERMINAL” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 381, File 319, Item 12641-12)
2023 – Looking northwest along Bay St towards the former Toronto Coach Terminal on the left in downtown Toronto
2023 – Looking northwest along Bay St towards the former Toronto Coach Terminal on the left in downtown Toronto
Circa 1954 – Looking southwest along Bay St toward the Bus Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Notice the McKnight Building next to the terminal. The sign on the back corner of the streetcar says: "HURRY KILLS! walk... drive... CAREFULLY!"
Circa 1954 – Looking southwest along Bay St toward the Bus Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Notice the McKnight Building next to the terminal. The sign on the back corner of the streetcar says: “HURRY KILLS! walk… drive… CAREFULLY!” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 381, File 319, Item 12641-10)
2023 – Looking southwest along Bay St toward the former Toronto Coach Terminal at Edward St in downtown Toronto. Notice the top of the CN Tower peeking out in the centre-background
2023 – Looking southwest along Bay St toward the former Toronto Coach Terminal at Edward St in downtown Toronto. Notice the top of the CN Tower peeking out in the centre-background
September 14, 1954 -  Looking southeast from Edward St west of Bay St towards the Toronto Coach Terminal. Notice the number of pick-up bays at the terminal had increased from four to six and Hotel Ford in the background
September 14, 1954 – Looking southeast from Edward St west of Bay St towards the Toronto Coach Terminal. Notice the number of pick-up bays at the terminal had increased from four to six and Hotel Ford in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Series 381, File 312, ID 12330-6)
2023– Looking southeast towards the covered loading area at the former Toronto Coach Terminal located at 610 Bay St and Edward St, in downtown Toronto
2023– Looking southeast towards the covered loading area at the former Toronto Coach Terminal located at 610 Bay St and Edward St, in downtown Toronto
2021 – Looking southwest towards the bays of the former Toronto Coach Terminal from Edward St, just west of Bay St in downtown Toronto. The terminal closed in July 2021
2021 – Looking southwest towards the bays of the former Toronto Coach Terminal from Edward St, just west of Bay St in downtown Toronto. The terminal closed in July 2021
May 1, 1955 – Looking southwest from Edward St just east of Chestnut St towards the bus parking lot. Notice the Canada Life Building's weather beacon on the left and the former MacLean-Hunter Publishing Building on the right
May 1, 1955 – Looking southwest from Edward St just east of Chestnut St towards the bus parking lot. Notice the Canada Life Building‘s weather beacon on the left and the former MacLean-Hunter Publishing Building on the right (Toronto Public Library R-1139)
1955 - Looking southeast on Edward St, west of Elizabeth St, towards the bus parking lot. Notice the Toronto Coach Terminal and Hotel Ford in the background
1955 – Looking southeast on Edward St, west of Elizabeth St, towards the bus parking lot. Notice the Toronto Coach Terminal and Hotel Ford in the background (Toronto Public Library R-4010)
2023– Looking southeast from Edward St and Chestnut St towards the former Elizabeth St Terminal with the Toronto Coach Terminal in the background
2023– Looking southeast from Edward St and Chestnut St towards the former Elizabeth St Terminal with the Toronto Coach Terminal in the background
1972 – Looking southwest towards the Toronto Coach Terminal at Bay St and Edward St. The Art-Deco-style building is faced with Queenston limestone
1972 – Looking southwest towards the Toronto Coach Terminal at Bay St and Edward St. The Art-Deco-style building is faced with Queenston limestone (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 59, Item 23)
2023 - Looking northwest from Bay St and Dundas St W towards the McKnight Building in the left foreground and the former Toronto Coach Terminal next door in downtown Toronto
2023 – Looking northwest from Bay St and Dundas St W towards the McKnight Building in the left foreground and the former Toronto Coach Terminal next door in downtown Toronto
1965 – Looking northwest from Bay St and Dundas St W towards the McKnight Building in the left foreground and the Toronto Coach Terminal next door, in downtown Toronto
1965 – Looking northwest from Bay St and Dundas St W towards the McKnight Building in the left foreground and the Toronto Coach Terminal next door, in downtown Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Series 648, File 168, ID 1)
2020 – Looking southwest toward the Toronto Coach Terminal at Bay St and Edward St. The spandrels between the first and second stories are made of cast aluminum
2020 – Looking southwest toward the Toronto Coach Terminal at Bay St and Edward St. The spandrels between the first and second stories are made of cast aluminum
1972 – Looking southeast from Elizabeth St and Edward St towards the covered bays of the Toronto Coach Terminal. By this time, the terminal had a total of nine bays
1972 – Looking southeast from Elizabeth St and Edward St towards the covered bays of the Toronto Coach Terminal. By this time, the terminal had a total of nine bays (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 46, Item 29)
2023 – Looking southeast from Edward St and Elizabeth St towards the covered bays of the former Toronto Coach Terminal
2023 – Looking southeast from Edward St and Elizabeth St towards the covered bays of the former Toronto Coach Terminal
2023 – Looking northwest towards the former Toronto Coach Terminal from Bay St, just south of Edward St in downtown Toronto
2023 – Looking northwest towards the former Toronto Coach Terminal from Bay St, just south of Edward St in downtown Toronto
1972 - Looking southwest toward the extension of Toronto Coach Terminal at Elizabeth St and Edward St. The Elizabeth St Terminal was completed in 1968 and is located right across the street from the main terminal. Notice the Canada Life Building in the background
1972 – Looking southwest toward the extension of Toronto Coach Terminal at Elizabeth St and Edward St. The Elizabeth St Terminal was completed in 1968 and is located right across the street from the main terminal. Notice the Canada Life Building in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 46, Item 30)
2023 – Looking southwest towards the former Annex Terminal Building at Elizabeth St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. The terminal was built in 1968 and was later partially covered. It's across the street from the former Toronto Coach Terminal
2023 – Looking southwest towards the former Annex Terminal Building at Elizabeth St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. The terminal was built in 1968 and was later partially covered. It’s across the street from the former Toronto Coach Terminal
2023 – The former Annex Terminal Building at 130 Elizabeth St
2023 – The former Annex Terminal Building at 130 Elizabeth St
2023 – The entrance to the former Annex Terminal Building at 130 Elizabeth St in downtown Toronto
2023 – The entrance to the former Annex Terminal Building at 130 Elizabeth St in downtown Toronto
December 9, 1931 - Artists line drawing of the Toronto Coach Terminal at the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St. The building was designed by architect Charles B Dolphin
December 9, 1931 – Artists line drawing of the Toronto Coach Terminal at the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St. The building was designed by architect Charles B Dolphin (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9003)
1930 - Architect Charles B Dolphin carved nine miniature wooden coaches to verify the buses’ parking, turning and movement. Mr Dolphin did this in his canoe on Clear Lake during his summer vacation
1930 – Architect Charles B Dolphin carved nine miniature wooden coaches to verify the buses’ parking, turning and movement. Mr Dolphin did this in his canoe on Clear Lake during his summer vacation (Construction journal)
Late 1920s - Architectural drawings by Charles B Dolphin of the first floor and yard of the Toronto Coach Terminal
Late 1920s – Architectural drawings by Charles B Dolphin of the first floor and yard of the Toronto Coach Terminal (Construction Journal)
February 12, 1930 - Before the Toronto Bus Terminal building was constructed in 1931, there was an open-air terminal at the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St. This storefront at 596-598 Bay St in the McKnight Building (right next door from the open-air terminal), was the Gray Coach Lines waiting room. The McKnight Building still exists today at the northwest corner of Dundas St W and Bay St
February 12, 1930 – Before the Toronto Bus Terminal building was constructed in 1931, there was an open-air terminal at the southwest corner of Bay St and Edward St. This storefront at 596-598 Bay St in the McKnight Building (right next door from the open-air terminal), was the Gray Coach Lines waiting room. The McKnight Building still exists today at the northwest corner of Dundas St W and Bay St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 7420)
2023 - The storefronts at 596-598 Bay St in the McKnight Building were once the waiting room for the Gray Coach Lines open-air terminal, located on the former Toronto Bus Terminal site before it was constructed in 1931. Those storefronts are occupied by Unholy Donuts and, until recently (2022), the original location of Uncle Tetsu's Japanese Cheesecake
2023 – The storefronts at 596-598 Bay St in the McKnight Building were once the waiting room for the Gray Coach Lines open-air terminal, located on the former Toronto Bus Terminal site before it was constructed in 1931. Those storefronts are occupied by Unholy Donuts and, until recently (2022), the original location of Uncle Tetsu’s Japanese Cheesecake
2019 – Looking southwest from Bay St and Edward St towards the Toronto Coach Terminal. The bus terminal closed in July 2021
2019 – Looking southwest from Bay St and Edward St towards the Toronto Coach Terminal. The bus terminal closed in July 2021
2019 – Looking southwest from Edward St, just west of Bay St, towards the covered bays at the Toronto Coach Terminal
2019 – Looking southwest from Edward St, just west of Bay St, towards the covered bays at the Toronto Coach Terminal
2019 - Gray Coach Lines sign plate at the main entrance of the Toronto Coach Terminal 610 Bay St in downtown Toronto
2019 – Gray Coach Lines sign plate at the main entrance of the Toronto Coach Terminal 610 Bay St in downtown Toronto
2020 – Looking southwest towards the Toronto Coach Terminal located at 610 Bay St. The terminal closed the following year in July 2021
2020 – Looking southwest towards the Toronto Coach Terminal located at 610 Bay St. The terminal closed the following year in July 2021
2020 – Looking west towards the entrance to the Toronto Coach Terminal located at 610 Bay St in downtown Toronto. The two-storey bus terminal was officially opened in 1931
2020 – Looking west towards the entrance to the Toronto Coach Terminal located at 610 Bay St in downtown Toronto. The two-storey bus terminal was officially opened in 1931
2022 – Looking west at the former Toronto Coach Terminal at 610 Bay St in downtown Toronto. The building received heritage status in 1987, and there are plans to preserve and adaptively reuse the building
2022 – Looking west at the former Toronto Coach Terminal at 610 Bay St in downtown Toronto. The building received heritage status in 1987, and there are plans to preserve and adaptively reuse the building
2023 – Entrance to the Pedestrian Walkway at the former Toronto Coach Terminal off Elizabeth St
2023 – Entrance to the Pedestrian Walkway at the former Toronto Coach Terminal off Elizabeth St
2023 – The new Union Station Bus Terminal (USBT) at the northeast corner of Bay St and Lake Shore Blvd W in Toronto
2023 – The new Union Station Bus Terminal (USBT) at the northeast corner of Bay St and Lake Shore Blvd W in Toronto
2023 – Union Station Bus Terminal opened at CIBC Square in December 2020, and the Bay St Terminal closed in July 2021
2023 – Union Station Bus Terminal opened at CIBC Square in December 2020, and the Bay St Terminal closed in July 2021
2023 – The bus gates at the new Union Station Bus Terminal (USBT) in the CIBC Square at 81 Bay St in Toronto
2023 – The bus gates at the new Union Station Bus Terminal (USBT) in the CIBC Square at 81 Bay St in Toronto
SOURCE
  • City of Toronto Heritage Register: 610 Bay St
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: Dec 18, 1931, pg 39
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Dec 21, 1931, pgs 4, 11 & 14
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Sep 10, 1957, pg 4
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Dec 5, 1968, pg 10
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Feb 4, 1974, pg 5
  • Construction: Apr 1932, Volume 25, Issue 1, pgs 91-96
  • Modern TO: 610 Bay St & 130 Elizabeth St – Community Information Session on Jul 21, 2022
  • ModernTO: 610 Bay St
  • Photos: Denise Marie for TorontoJourney416
  • Vintage Photos: City of Toronto Archives & Toronto Public Library

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