Thornton & Lucie Blackburn – Their Escape to Freedom

Posted:

February 10, 2024 – Brick pavers at Inglenook Community School show where Thornton and Lucie Blackburn's barn once stood. The barn was located at the northeast corner of Eastern Ave and Sackville St and was where Thornton housed his horse-drawn cab. The couple escaped enslavement in the 1830s and made Toronto their home
February 10, 2024 – Brick pavers at Inglenook Community School show where Thornton and Lucie Blackburn’s barn once stood. The barn was located at the northeast corner of Eastern Ave and Sackville St and was where Thornton housed his horse-drawn cab

Thornton and Lucie Blackburn’s story begins in the United States. Thornton was born to enslavement in Maysville, Kentucky, in 1812. He was the third son of Sibby and sold at the age of 3 to become a living present for the 9-year-old grandson of a slaveholder. During his upbringing, Thornton worked as a house servant and coachman, the latter of which he would turn into a successful business later in life. When Thornton was 17, he was hired out to work as a porter at a dry goods store in Louisville called Wurts and Reinhard.

In 1831, 19-year-old Thornton met and fell in love with Ruthie, a nursemaid enslaved in a separate household. Lucie was then known as Ruthie, and it’s thought that she was born in the West Indies around 1803. Thornton and Ruthie soon married, but shortly after, Ruthie was sold, and so started the couple’s courageous escape to freedom.

After obtaining forged papers identifying them as free people, Thornton and Ruthie left Louisville and travelled by ferry, steamboat, and stagecoach to Detroit, where they settled down. For two years, the couple lived comfortably in their new hometown until they were discovered by Thornton’s former supervisor from the Wurts and Reinhard store. He notified authorities, and soon, slave agents arrived.

The Blackburn Riots of 1833

The Blackburns were sentenced to return to Louisville, Kentucky and put in jail. The ruling angered African American residents of Detroit and beyond. The night before Ruthie’s forced return, two respectable ladies from a church congregation freed her, and she made it safely into Upper Canada. The next day, Thornton was rescued with the help of a massive crowd of friends and supporters. He and a few of his rescuers were able to follow Ruthie to freedom. The two-day event became known as “The Blackburn Riots,” and it had long-lasting effects on Detroit’s Black community.

Even though Thornton and Ruthie had made it to Upper Canada, they were not yet free. They were held at the request of US government officials for charges that included inciting civil unrest. Despite extradition requests, Lieutenant Governor and abolitionist Sir John Colborne was not willing to send the couple back to enslavement in the US. Thornton and Ruthie were given asylum in Upper Canada, and in celebration, Ruthie changed her name to Lucie.

Their story helped to bring attention to the issue of slavery and the importance of the Underground Railroad in bringing freedom to those who were oppressed.

Thornton & Lucie Make Toronto Their Home

The Blackburns settled in Toronto in 1834, and Thornton found his older brother Alfred, who had also escaped slavery, already living in the city. Thornton and Lucie built a small one-storey wood-frame house at the southwest corner of Eastern Ave (known then as South Park) and Sumach St in the Corktown neighbourhood.

1844 - Looking west on King St E, just west of Jarvis St in Toronto's Old Town neighbourhood. The Blackburn's horse-drawn cab, "The City," is visible in the centre of the image. The cab stand was located on Church St, just north of King St E and next to St James Cathedral, whose steeple is also visible in the painting by artist John Gillespie
1844 – Looking west on King St E, just west of Jarvis St in Toronto’s Old Town neighbourhood. The Blackburn’s horse-drawn cab, “The City,” is visible in the centre of the image (Courtesy of Royal Ontario Museum)

Thornton worked as a waiter at Osgoode Hall. He heard about the hackney cab, a two-wheeled, one-horse vehicle for hire in Montreal. Thornton decided to open his own business and approached Paul Bishop, a skilled blacksmith and mechanic, to make the cab, which he delivered in 1837. He named his horse-drawn, 4-passenger cab “The City.” It was yellow with red trim and was Upper Canada’s first taxi service.

The cab stand was located on Church St, just north of King St E and west of The Cathedral Church of St James. Thornton stored the cab on his property in a barn once at the northeast corner of Eastern Ave and Sackville St. For years, the Blackburns operated Toronto’s only cab service.

Thornton Rescues His Mother

In 1837, Thornton embarked on a brave journey back into the US to rescue his mother, Sibby, who was living in slavery in Augusta, Kentucky. He successfully brought his senior mother to Canada, where she could live the remainder of her life in freedom.

Respected & Influential Citizens

With their growing financial resources and knowledge, the Blackburns contributed to various initiatives to assist other freedom-seekers. They also played a significant role in the construction of Little Trinity Anglican Church. In 1851, Thornton was a delegate at the “North American Convention of Coloured Freemen,” which was one of the first meetings ever held at St Lawrence Hall. He retired from his cab business in the 1860s.

In 1887, Sackville Street Public School, today called Inglenook Community School, was built just north of the Blackburns’ property. According to an Annual Report of the Inspector of the Public Schools, the City of Toronto paid T. Blackburn $5,544.00 for the land that was used for the school site.

The couple remained at their home on Eastern Ave until 1890. That year, Thornton passed away on February 26, at the age of 77 or 78. After Thornton died, Lucie moved to a house once at 73 Bleeker St and lived there until her passing on February 6, 1895, at the age of 89 or 90. Their property later became part of the schoolyard.

Thornton and Lucie, along with Sibby and Alfred, are buried at the Toronto Necropolis near acquaintance and fellow abolitionist George Brown.

Thornton and Lucie Blackburn were able to secure their freedom, but unfortunately, life in Toronto was not the ideal society they had envisioned. They faced numerous challenges, such as racist violence, discrimination, and segregation, which made life very difficult for Black Canadians.

Discovery of their Home

February 25, 2024 – A memorial to Lucie and Thornton Blackburn is located at Inglenook Community School grounds. From 1834 until 1890, the site had been home to the couple who escaped enslavement in Kentucky
February 25, 2024 – A memorial to Lucie and Thornton Blackburn is located at Inglenook Community School grounds. From 1834 until 1890, the site had been home to the couple who escaped enslavement in Kentucky

In 1985, the land where Thornton and Lucie Blackburn once lived became the first archaeological dig on an Underground Railroad site in Canada. The excavation at what’s now part of Inglenook Community School yard uncovered the foundations of the Blackburns’ barn, as well as buttons, bottles, and many marbles since it had been school grounds for over 100 years.

A memorial to Lucie and Thornton Blackburn is located on the school grounds. Brick pavers show where their barn once stood.

Did You Know?

  • Sir John Graves Simcoe, the first Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada, was instrumental in passing the Act Against Slavery in 1793.
  • Long after Thornton retired from his cab business, he would be greeted with, “You were the man who drove my eldest boy to his christening,” or “Ha! It is you who drove me to my wedding.”
  • There are no known photos of the Blackburns.
  • Paul Bishop, the person who made Thornton’s cab, had his shop at the northeast corner of Adelaide St E and Sherbourne St, with his house right across the street on the southeast corner. Paul Bishop’s house was built in 1842 and still stands today.
  • In 1999, Thornton and Lucie Blackburn became National Historic Persons through the recommendations of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. There are heritage plaques in their honour in Toronto at Inglenook Community School (formerly Sackville Street Public School) Toronto and in Louisville at 4th and Main (once the location of the Wurts and Reinhard store).
  • Dr Karolyn Smardz Frost, Ph. D., an archaeologist, historian and professor, discovered the Blackburn’s home. Dr Smardz Frost wrote Thornton and Lucie’s story in I’ve Got A Home In Glory Land: A Lost Tale of the Underground Railroad, which received the 2007 Governor General’s Literary Award for Nonfiction.
  • In 2016, George Brown College opened the Lucie & Thornton Blackburn Conference Centre at The George student residence at 80 Cooperage St.

The Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses used by enslaved African Americans in the 19th century to escape to freedom in the Northern states and Canada. It was called “underground” because its operations were carried out secretly and under cover of darkness. “Railroad” refers to the railway terminology used as code to move people along the routes. A few of those terms included:

  • People escaping slavery were called “passengers, cargo or freight.” They followed “the drinking gourd,” the Big Dipper constellation. It points towards the North Star and freedom.
  • Hiding places were known as “stations or depots.” There would be lanterns in the windows welcoming freedom seekers.
  • Guides were named “conductors.” One such guide was Harriet Tubman, who herself escaped slavery and travelled back to the US 19 times to save others via the Underground Railroad.
  • Routes were referred to as “tracks.”
  • Financial supporters were called “stockholders.”
  • The Northern states and Canada were referred to as a “terminal.”

Over 30,000 people made it to safety in Canada on the Underground Railroad.

Thornton & Lucie Blackburn Photos

1844 - Looking west on King St E, just west of Jarvis St in Toronto's Old Town neighbourhood. The Blackburn's yellow horse-drawn cab, "The City," is visible in the centre of the image. The cab stand was located on Church St, just north of King St E and next to St James Cathedral, whose steeple is also visible in the painting by artist John Gillespie
1844 – Looking west on King St E, just west of Jarvis St in Toronto’s Old Town neighbourhood. The Blackburn’s yellow horse-drawn cab, “The City,” is visible in the centre of the image. The cab stand was located on Church St, just north of King St E and next to St James Cathedral, whose steeple is also visible in the painting by artist John Gillespie (Courtesy of Royal Ontario Museum)
March 2, 2024 – Looking west on King St E, just west of Jarvis St, in Toronto's Old Town neighbourhood. In the mid-1800s, the Blackburns' horse-drawn cab, "The City," was a familiar sight on the street. The cab stand was located on Church St, just north of King St E, next to St James Cathedral (as it was known then).

St Lawrence Hall is in the left foreground and was where Thornton was a delegate at the “North American Convention of Coloured Freemen” in 1851. It was one of the first meetings ever held in the building. Notice The Cathedral Church of St James in the distance
March 2, 2024 – Looking west on King St E, just west of Jarvis St, in Toronto’s Old Town neighbourhood. In the mid-1800s, the Blackburns’ horse-drawn cab, “The City,” was a familiar sight on the street. The cab stand was located on Church St, just north of King St E, next to St James Cathedral (as it was known then).

St Lawrence Hall is in the left foreground and was where Thornton was a delegate at the “North American Convention of Coloured Freemen” in 1851. It was one of the first meetings ever held in the building. Notice The Cathedral Church of St James in the distance
February 25, 2024 – A memorial to Lucie and Thornton Blackburn is located at Inglenook Community School grounds. From 1834 until 1890, the site had been home to the couple who escaped enslavement in Kentucky
February 25, 2024 – A memorial to Lucie and Thornton Blackburn is located at Inglenook Community School grounds. From 1834 until 1890, the site had been home to the couple who escaped enslavement in Kentucky
February 10, 2024 – Brick pavers at Inglenook Community School show where Thornton and Lucie Blackburn's barn once stood. Their home was just metres to the east. Thornton operated Upper Canada's first taxi service and stored his cab in the barn
February 10, 2024 – Brick pavers at Inglenook Community School show where Thornton and Lucie Blackburn’s barn once stood. Their home was just metres to the east. Thornton operated Upper Canada’s first taxi service and stored his cab in the barn
February 25, 2024 – A memorial to Thornton and Lucie Blackburn at Inglenook Community School grounds. Archaeologists uncovered the foundations of their barn during a 1985 dig
February 25, 2024 – A memorial to Thornton and Lucie Blackburn at Inglenook Community School grounds. Archaeologists uncovered the foundations of their barn during a 1985 dig
February 25, 2024 – Artifacts found at the site of Blackburns' former property during a 1985 archaeological dig included buttons, bottles and marbles. Lucie and Thornton Blackburn lived on Eastern Ave, between Sackville St and Sumach St, from 1834 until 1890. Today, it's the site of Inglenook Community School
February 25, 2024 – Artifacts found at the site of Blackburns’ former property during a 1985 archaeological dig included buttons, bottles and marbles. Lucie and Thornton Blackburn lived on Eastern Ave, between Sackville St and Sumach St, from 1834 until 1890. Today, it’s the site of Inglenook Community School
February 10, 2024 – Looking west at the Inglenook Community School grounds at 19 Sackville St, towards the memorial to Lucie and Thornton Blackburn. The couple escaped enslavement from Kentucky in the 1830s, eventually making Toronto their home. The brick pavers show where the Blackburns' barn once stood, and their home was just metres to the east
February 10, 2024 – Looking west at the Inglenook Community School grounds at 19 Sackville St, towards the memorial to Lucie and Thornton Blackburn. The couple escaped enslavement from Kentucky in the 1830s, eventually making Toronto their home. The brick pavers show where the Blackburns’ barn once stood, and their home was just metres to the east
February 10, 2024 – Part of the memorial to Thornton and Lucie Blackburn at Inglenook Community School in Toronto's Corktown neighbourhood
February 10, 2024 – Part of the memorial to Thornton and Lucie Blackburn at Inglenook Community School in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood
February 10, 2024 – Brick pavers at Inglenook Community School show where Thornton and Lucie Blackburn's barn once stood. The barn was located at the northeast corner of Eastern Ave and Sackville St and was where Thornton housed his horse-drawn cab. The Blackburns' home was a few metres to the east of the barn
February 10, 2024 – Brick pavers at Inglenook Community School show where Thornton and Lucie Blackburn’s barn once stood. The barn was located at the northeast corner of Eastern Ave and Sackville St and was where Thornton housed his horse-drawn cab. The Blackburns’ home was a few metres to the east of the barn
February 25, 2024 – Thornton and Lucie Blackburn, along with his mother Sibby and his brother Alfred, are buried at the Toronto Necropolis.

The red granite oblique reads:

In Memory of Thornton Blackburn
Died Feb. 26 1890 - Aged 76 Years
A Native of Maysville Kentucky U. S.
Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord
February 25, 2024 – Thornton and Lucie Blackburn, along with his mother Sibby and his brother Alfred, are buried at the Toronto Necropolis.

The red granite oblique reads:

In Memory of Thornton Blackburn
Died Feb. 26 1890 – Aged 76 Years
A Native of Maysville Kentucky U. S.
Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord
A vintage photo (circa 1901) on display inside the Scadding Cabin (then known as the Simcoe Cabin) at Exhibition Place.

Thornton Blackburn's cab, "The City," is pointed out in front of the cabin on the left side. Mr Blackburn operated Toronto's first hackney cab service
A vintage photo (circa 1901) on display inside the Scadding Cabin (then known as the Simcoe Cabin) at Exhibition Place. Thornton Blackburn’s cab, “The City,” is pointed out in front of the cabin on the left side. Mr Blackburn operated Toronto’s first hackney cab service
February 25, 2024 – Looking northwest from Eastern Ave and Sumach St towards Inglenook Community School, originally Sackville Street Public School, in Toronto's Corktown neighbourhood. From 1834 until 1890, the south portion of what later became the school's property belonged to Thornton and Lucie Blackburn. Thornton Blackburn operated Upper Canada's first cab service called "The City" - a two-wheeled, one-horse vehicle for hire
February 25, 2024 – Looking northwest from Eastern Ave and Sumach St towards Inglenook Community School, originally Sackville Street Public School, in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood. From 1834 until 1890, the south portion of what later became the school’s property belonged to Thornton and Lucie Blackburn. Thornton Blackburn operated Upper Canada’s first cab service called “The City” – a two-wheeled, one-horse vehicle for hire
1972 – Looking northwest towards Sackville Street Public School, from Eastern Ave and Sumach St in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto. Thornton and Lucie Blackburn's house and barn once stood on what's today the south side of the school's property
1972 – Looking northwest towards Sackville Street Public School, from Eastern Ave and Sumach St in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto. Thornton and Lucie Blackburn’s house and barn once stood on what’s today the south side of the school’s property (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 11, Item 4)
February 10, 2024 – Looking north towards Inglenook Community School, originally Sackville Street Public School, from Eastern Ave and Sackville St in Toronto's Corktown neighbourhood. Thornton and Lucie Blackburn's house and barn once stood along the south portion of the school's property
February 10, 2024 – Looking north towards Inglenook Community School, originally Sackville Street Public School, from Eastern Ave and Sackville St in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood. Thornton and Lucie Blackburn’s house and barn once stood along the south portion of the school’s property
1972 – Looking north from Eastern Ave and Sackville St towards Sackville Street Public School in Toronto's Corktown neighbourhood. While the school has been located here for over 130 years, the south portion of the school's property once belonged to Thornton and Lucie Blackburn. In the 1830s, the Blackburns escaped enslavement and made Toronto their home
1972 – Looking north from Eastern Ave and Sackville St towards Sackville Street Public School in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood. While the school has been located here for over 130 years, the south portion of the school’s property once belonged to Thornton and Lucie Blackburn. In the 1830s, the Blackburns escaped enslavement and made Toronto their home (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 19, Item 31)
2021 - The heritage plaque reads: 

Thornton and Lucie Blackburn

"The Blackburns' determination to build free lives provides a window on the experience of many refugees in the Underground Railroad era. Having fled slavery in Kentucky, they were arrested in Detroit in 1833. Their capture sparked riots, and in the confusion, they managed to escape to Upper Canada. Here, the government twice defended them against extradition, and by 1834, the couple had settled in Toronto. Respected citizens, they established the city's first cab company, worked for Abolition and contributed to the well-being of their community."

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Government of Canada
Plaque is located at 19 Sackville St
2021 – The heritage plaque reads:

Thornton and Lucie Blackburn

“The Blackburns’ determination to build free lives provides a window on the experience of many refugees in the Underground Railroad era. Having fled slavery in Kentucky, they were arrested in Detroit in 1833. Their capture sparked riots, and in the confusion, they managed to escape to Upper Canada. Here, the government twice defended them against extradition, and by 1834, the couple had settled in Toronto. Respected citizens, they established the city’s first cab company, worked for Abolition and contributed to the well-being of their community.”

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Government of Canada

Plaque is located at 19 Sackville St
February 25, 2024 - The heritage plaque reads:  

Thornton and Lucie Blackburn 

"In 1985, archaeologists digging on this site uncovered fascinating clues to Toronto's history as a terminus of the famous Underground Railroad. From 1834 to 1890, this site had been the home of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn, refugee slaves from Kentucky who started Toronto's first taxicab company. 

Thornton and Lucie Blackburn escaped on July 3, 1831, by taking a steamboat up the Ohio River from Louisville to Cincinnati and then a stagecoach to Michigan. Their recapture in Detroit two years later resulted in the "Blackburn riots of 1833". Detroit's Black community staged a dramatic rescue and aided the Blackburns across the border to safety in Canada. Despite two extradition requests by Michigan's governor, they were allowed to remain free and begin their new lives in Canada. 

The Blackburns became well-known members of Toronto's African Canadian community. They helped to build Little Trinity Anglican Church, and contributed to efforts organized to assist other freedom-seekers, both in Toronto and at Buxton in southwestern Ontario. Thornton participated in the "North American Convention of Coloured Freemen" at St. Lawrence Hall in September of 1851 and was an associate of George Brown in anti-slavery activities. 

The excavation of the Blackburns' former home remains the only archaeological dig on an Underground Railroad site ever conducted in Toronto. In 1999, the Department of Canadian Heritage designated Thornton and Lucie Blackburn "Persons of National Historic Significance" in recognition of their generosity to the less fortunate and their lifelong resistance to slavery and racial oppression." 

Parks Canada
Plaque is located at 19 Sackville St
February 25, 2024 – The heritage plaque reads:

Thornton and Lucie Blackburn

“In 1985, archaeologists digging on this site uncovered fascinating clues to Toronto’s history as a terminus of the famous Underground Railroad. From 1834 to 1890, this site had been the home of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn, refugee slaves from Kentucky who started Toronto’s first taxicab company.

Thornton and Lucie Blackburn escaped on July 3, 1831, by taking a steamboat up the Ohio River from Louisville to Cincinnati and then a stagecoach to Michigan. Their recapture in Detroit two years later resulted in the “Blackburn riots of 1833”. Detroit’s Black community staged a dramatic rescue and aided the Blackburns across the border to safety in Canada. Despite two extradition requests by Michigan’s governor, they were allowed to remain free and begin their new lives in Canada.

The Blackburns became well-known members of Toronto’s African Canadian community. They helped to build Little Trinity Anglican Church, and contributed to efforts organized to assist other freedom-seekers, both in Toronto and at Buxton in southwestern Ontario. Thornton participated in the “North American Convention of Coloured Freemen” at St. Lawrence Hall in September of 1851 and was an associate of George Brown in anti-slavery activities.

The excavation of the Blackburns’ former home remains the only archaeological dig on an Underground Railroad site ever conducted in Toronto. In 1999, the Department of Canadian Heritage designated Thornton and Lucie Blackburn “Persons of National Historic Significance” in recognition of their generosity to the less fortunate and their lifelong resistance to slavery and racial oppression.”

Parks Canada
Plaque is located at 19 Sackville St
February 25, 2024 - Thornton and Lucie Blackburn heritage plaques at Inglenook Community School at 19 Sackville St in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto
February 25, 2024 – Thornton and Lucie Blackburn heritage plaques at Inglenook Community School at 19 Sackville St in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto
February 25, 2024 – Site Specific is a 40-metre-long linear artwork created by Scott Eunson and Marianne Lovink in 2015 for Waterfront Toronto. It pays tribute to the area’s history, from the end of the last ice age to the present day and has an expanded focus on Lucie and Thornton Blackburn. The piece features two complimentary layers of imagery cut from Corten and Stainless Steel. The artwork is located at the northwest corner of Sumach St and Eastern Ave in Corktown
February 25, 2024 – Site Specific is a 40-metre-long linear artwork created by Scott Eunson and Marianne Lovink in 2015 for Waterfront Toronto. It pays tribute to the area’s history, from the end of the last ice age to the present day and has an expanded focus on Lucie and Thornton Blackburn. The piece features two complimentary layers of imagery cut from Corten and Stainless Steel. The artwork is located at the northwest corner of Sumach St and Eastern Ave in Corktown
February 25, 2024 – A portion of the Site Specific linear art installation by Scott Eunson and Marianne Lovink features a tribute to the Blackburns and shows Thornton's name and hackney cab. The artwork is located along Sumach St, at Eastern Ave in Toronto's Corktown neighbourhood. Lucie and Thornton Blackburn lived at the site from 1834 until 1890. They operated Upper Canada's first taxi service - a one-horse, two-wheel vehicle for hire
February 25, 2024 – A portion of the Site Specific linear art installation by Scott Eunson and Marianne Lovink features a tribute to the Blackburns and shows Thornton’s name and hackney cab. The artwork is located along Sumach St, at Eastern Ave in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood. Lucie and Thornton Blackburn lived at the site from 1834 until 1890. They operated Upper Canada’s first taxi service – a one-horse, two-wheel vehicle for hire
March 2, 2024 – Looking north on Church St from King St E in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. In the mid-1800s, Thornton Blackburn's cab stand was located near this area on the west side of Church St. It was across the street from The Cathedral Church of St James
March 2, 2024 – Looking north on Church St from King St E in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. In the mid-1800s, Thornton Blackburn’s cab stand was located near this area on the west side of Church St. It was across the street from The Cathedral Church of St James
March 10, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the Lucie & Thornton Blackburn Conference Centre at The George student residence at Cooperage St and Front St E, in Toronto's West Don Lands area. George Brown College opened the centre in 2016
March 10, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the Lucie & Thornton Blackburn Conference Centre at The George student residence at Cooperage St and Front St E, in Toronto’s West Don Lands area. George Brown College opened the centre in 2016
1880 - Goads Map showing the location of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn's property at the northeast corner of Eastern Ave and Sackville St in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto. Lucie and Thornton's wood-frame home fronted Eastern Ave, and the address was 70 Eastern Ave
1880 – Goads Map showing the location of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn’s property at the northeast corner of Eastern Ave and Sackville St in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto. Lucie and Thornton’s wood-frame home fronted Eastern Ave, and the address was 70 Eastern Ave (Toronto Public Library)
1891 - The Toronto City Directory showing the address of Lucie (Lucy) Blackburn. Lucie moved from 70 Eastern Ave to 73 Bleeker St around 1890, after Thornton's passing
1891 – The Toronto City Directory showing the address of Lucie (Lucy) Blackburn. Lucie moved from 70 Eastern Ave to 73 Bleeker St around 1890, after Thornton’s passing (Toronto Public Library)
1887 - Financial statements showing T. Blackburn was paid $5,544.00 for the land that was used for the Sackville Street Public School site
1887 – Financial statements showing T. Blackburn was paid $5,544.00 for the land that was used for the Sackville Street Public School site (Annual Report of the Inspector of the Public Schools of the City of Toronto – Canadiana)
1879 - The Toronto City Directory showing the address of Thornton Blackburn. Eastern Ave was previously known as South Park. Thornton's address is shown here as 54; however, the numbers were later updated, and it was changed to 70 Eastern Ave
1879 – The Toronto City Directory showing the address of Thornton Blackburn. Eastern Ave was previously known as South Park. Thornton’s address is shown here as 54; however, the numbers were later updated, and it was changed to 70 Eastern Ave (Toronto Public Library)
1843/44 - The Toronto City Directory showing the address of Thornton Blackburn. Notice the misspelling of his first and last name as "Thomson Blackbern" and his brother Alfred is shown just above Thornton's name. Prior to being called Eastern Ave, the street was known as South Park
1843/44 – The Toronto City Directory showing the address of Thornton Blackburn. Notice the misspelling of his first and last name as “Thomson Blackbern” and his brother Alfred is shown just above Thornton’s name. Prior to being called Eastern Ave, the street was known as South Park (Toronto Public Library)
SOURCE

Stay Connected

23,627FollowersFollow
103FollowersFollow
8,925FollowersFollow