Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place – A Glimpse into Toronto’s Military Past

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1918 - Troop drill marching by the arched passage which ran through the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks. Notice Stanley Barracks in the background
1918 – Troop drill marching by the arched passage which ran through the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks. Notice Stanley Barracks in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 790)

Stanley Barracks is located at 115 Princes’ Blvd (just west of Hotel X) at Exhibition Place in Toronto.

The New Fort

Built in 1841, Stanley Barracks was one of seven main buildings in what was originally known as the New Fort, a British military post established to supplement Fort York.

The complex was constructed of limestone and built by the Royal Engineers. It included an Officers’ Barracks and Mess (today called Stanley Barracks), three Soldiers’ Barracks, a hospital, a canteen and Barrack Master’s store, all surrounding a parade square. There were also various smaller structures like a magazine, dead house, stables, privies, armourer’s shop, wash house, ash pits, cleaning shed and wells. The entryway to the fort was through an arched passage running through the Enlisted Mens’ Barracks on the east side.

An armed sentry guarded the entrance, and on a shiny brass plate were the words:

This Barrack Establishment
For the headquarters and wing of a battalion
Estimated at 22,838£ sterling
Cost 20,904£ sterling
Commenced 12th (or 19th) February 1841
Completed 31st December 1841
Colonel Oldfield, K.H., A.D.C. to the Queen
Colonel on the staff, being commanding Royal Engineer and Lieut-Col Ward, Royal Engineers, Executive Officers

The first units stationed at the New Fort were the 93rd Sutherland Highlanders, the 71st and the Royal Canadian Rifles.

1884 - Looking southwest towards soldiers in Parade Square and the Officers' Quarters in the New Fort. Today, this building is known as Stanley Barracks and is the oldest surviving building constructed on Exhibition Place grounds
1884 – Looking southwest towards soldiers in Parade Square and the Officers’ Quarters in the New Fort. Today, this building is known as Stanley Barracks and is the oldest surviving building constructed on Exhibition Place grounds (City of Toronto Archives, Series 327, Sub Series 1, Item 19)

Over the years, the fort gradually expanded with wooden structures being added. There were quarters for those who were married, a north square surrounded by stables for up to 250 horses, storage sheds for guns, coal and forage, various shops including paint, carpenter, shoemaker, and a tailor, along with cookhouses and a wharf.

In 1870, the Royal Engineers transferred ownership of Fort York and the New Fort to the Dominion Government of Canada when the British Army permanently withdrew from the country. After the British troops left, some officers were allowed to live in the barracks, but the buildings and grounds deteriorated and fell out of repair.

North-West Mounted Police

For a few weeks, in 1874 and 1881, the only government use of the barracks was by the North-West Mounted Police. The recruits assembled at the fort, where they trained and performed drills on horseback before heading out to western Canada. The North-West Mounted Police were the forerunner to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

The Fairgrounds

In 1878, the 52-acre site just west of the New Fort was chosen as the new fairground. The first Toronto Industrial Exhibition, today’s CNE, was held the following year.

Units Stationed at the Barracks

1884 - Thirteen officers with "C" School of Infantry, and dog, posing outside the Officers Quarters at New Fort Barracks
1884 – Thirteen officers with “C” School of Infantry, and dog, posing outside the Officers Quarters at New Fort Barracks (City of Toronto Archives, Series 327, Sub Series 3, File 18)

When the Infantry School Corps “C” company moved into the fort in 1884, they repaired the buildings and cared for the grounds. The school taught young men how to be soldiers — their daily routine began at 6:30 am with little time for leisure. After-hours amusements included cricket, football, baseball, hockey, boating, and reading in the library. The regiment garrisoned Toronto until 1939 and is known today as The Royal Canadian Regiment.

Other units stationed at the barracks included the 16th and 30th Regiment of Foot, the Royal Artillery and the two cavalry regiments, the 13th Hussars and the Royal Canadian Dragoons.

The New Fort is Renamed Stanley Barracks

After 60 years of being called the New Fort, in 1893, it was renamed Stanley Barracks in honour of Governor General Lord Frederick Stanley. It was also Lord Stanley who donated the NHL’s most prized cup. By this time, the barracks had started to shrink, with most of the stables around the north square being torn down, along with a few structures around the main square.

During World War I (1914-1918), the Exhibition grounds were a major recruitment and training depot site. Its massive buildings were home to various departments of the Canadian Armed Forces, while from 1914 until 1916, Stanley Barracks became an internment camp for immigrant Eastern European civilians thought to be “enemy aliens.”

Throughout World War II (1939-1945), the Canadian military once again used the fairgrounds.

Public Housing

Between 1940 and 1950s - Looking northeast towards Stanley Barracks. The building served many purposes over the years. Originally the Officers' Barracks, it later served as public housing, museums, a restaurant and offices
Between 1940 and 1950s – Looking northeast towards Stanley Barracks. The building served many purposes over the years. Originally the Officers’ Barracks, it later served as public housing, museums, a restaurant and offices (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 742)

In 1946, the city negotiated with the Federal government to convert Stanley Barracks into emergency public housing. Hundreds of people moved into the old fort buildings. In 1947, there was a polio outbreak throughout much of the country. Cases were rising in Toronto and in the very crowded quarters of Stanley Barracks, with various buildings (known as blocks) placed under quarantine.

By the late 1940s, the barracks had become a dilapidated slum – the roofs were leaking, windows were broken or boarded up, the communal washrooms were filthy, and wallboards were in tatters. During the annual Canadian National Exhibition or trade shows, canvas was hung to veil the barracks from visitors. By August 1951, the last of the 144 families living in Stanley Barracks had been moved out.

And while demolition of the buildings at the barracks had continued throughout the years, those still standing were so neglected that they had to be torn down until all that was left was the Officers’ Quarters and Mess – the building became commonly known as the Stanley Barracks. The land surrounding the historic structure was paved over for a parking lot, with the stone foundations and support posts of the demolished structures sitting beneath the asphalt surface. Little by little, Exhibition grounds had gradually come to occupy the space once home to the fort.

The Museums

From 1955 to 1956, the barracks became Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame/Hockey Hall of Fame, then from 1959 to 2000, the Marine Museum of Upper Canada. It was also home to a restaurant, and the Toronto Historical Board once had its offices upstairs.

Treasures Beneath the Surface

In 1997, the $180 million National Trade Centre (later the Direct Energy Centre, and today, the Enercare Centre) opened; however, Exhibition Place lacked an on-site hotel to accommodate convention guests and visitors. The space south of the event centre, between Stanley Barracks and the Automotive Building, was chosen for the hotel site. But before things could get started, an archaeological assessment was needed.

So in 2004, ASI Heritage, a Toronto-based company specializing in heritage preservation, was contracted to look for remains of the old fort underground. During their excavations in 2004, 2008 and 2012, many incredible artifacts were found, including medallions, bone and shell buttons, medicine bottles, one-cent coins (dating to 1859), fragments of chamber pots, pocket knives, glass and stone marbles, white clay pipe bowls, marmalade jar pieces, slate pencils and inkpot fragments. They also discovered the limestone and brick foundations of the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks and support posts from a wooden porch.

During this time, the CNE asked developers to submit proposals for a hotel on the former fort site, which would include preserving some archaeological foundations. HK Hotels LLC, which also operates under the name Library Hotel Collection had the winning bid, and in 2013, the grounds were ready for the hotel’s construction to begin.

Hotel X Toronto, Stanley Barracks & the Canopied Walkway

2022 - Looking southeast towards the white canopied walkway and the 30-storey Hotel X Toronto at Exhibition Place. Notice the top of the CN Tower in the background on the left
2022 – Looking southeast towards the white canopied walkway and the 30-storey Hotel X Toronto at Exhibition Place. Notice the top of the CN Tower in the background on the left

In 2018, Hotel X Toronto opened at Exhibition Place. The 30-storey luxury lakefront urban resort features 404 guestrooms, entertainment facilities, restaurants, bars, lounges, a 90,000 sq ft athletic facility, a spa, event space and much more, not to mention its spectacular views of the lake and city.

Around Stanley Barracks, the beautifully landscaped Parade Gardens (north side) and the Stanley Gardens (south side) are available to rent for large outdoor events.

Under the white steel frame canopy to Hotel X from Princes’ Blvd, an elevated walkway passes over the preserved foundations of the north portion of the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks. The ruins are on display in a climate-controlled environment. The canopied walkway represents the stone building that once stood there, and its walls feature the emblems of some famous units once stationed at the fort.

Haunted Tales

There’s rumoured to be a lot of ghostly activity in Stanley Barracks. There’s Jenny, a little girl looking for her cat, and Jenny’s father, who is looking for her. But there are also two hostile and especially aggressive spirits, Bob and Dave, terrorizing the other spirits. When the building’s basement was home to a restaurant, workers mentioned cutlery and platters being moved around, perhaps by a more mischievous ghost. Click for more about the ghosts of Exhibition Place.

Did You Know?

2021 - Looking southwest towards Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto
2021 – Looking southwest towards Stanley Barracks and its heritage plaque at Exhibition Place in Toronto
  • The footprint of the New Fort was quite large. In today’s terms, it extended to: Heritage Court on the north, approximately Newfoundland Dr on the southeast, Lake Shore Blvd W on the south and the east bridge to Ontario Place on the southwest (see the 1884 map overlayed on a 2023 map image below).
  • The C School of Infantry was under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel William Otter, who also founded the Royal Canadian Military Institute (RCMI) at 426 University Ave.
  • The Officers’ Barracks (Stanley Barracks) narrowly escaped demolition in the mid-1950s.
  • The building received heritage status from the city in 1973.
  • The artifacts found during the 2012 archeological digs have been a part of a few exhibits and are generally held in storage.
  • Stanley Barracks is the oldest surviving building constructed on Exhibition Place grounds.

Stanley Barracks Photos

1884 - Looking southwest towards soldiers in Parade Square and the Officers' Quarters in the New Fort. Today, this building is known as Stanley Barracks and is the oldest surviving building constructed on Exhibition Place grounds
1884 – Looking southwest towards soldiers in Parade Square and the Officers’ Quarters in the New Fort. Today, this building is known as Stanley Barracks and is the oldest surviving building constructed on Exhibition Place grounds (City of Toronto Archives, Series 327, Sub Series 1, Item 19)
2022 – Looking southwest towards Stanley Barracks at 115 Princes' Blvd at Exhibition Place in Toronto. Built in 1841, Stanley Barracks was one of seven main buildings in what was originally known as the New Fort, a British military post established to supplement Fort York
2022 – Looking southwest towards Stanley Barracks at 115 Princes’ Blvd at Exhibition Place in Toronto. Built in 1841, Stanley Barracks was one of seven main buildings in what was originally known as the New Fort, a British military post established to supplement Fort York
1884 - Thirteen officers with the "C" School of Infantry, and a dog, posing outside the Officers Quarters at the New Fort Barracks
1884 – Thirteen officers with the “C” School of Infantry, and a dog, posing outside the Officers Quarters at the New Fort Barracks (City of Toronto Archives, Series 327, Sub Series 3, File 18)
Circa 1884 - Looking southwest in the New Fort, later known as Stanley Barracks. Several of the buildings shown in this photo were built in 1841 by the Royal Engineers. From left to right, the buildings originally served as the Officers' Quarters (today known as Stanley Barracks), Officers' Stables, Barrack Master's Store, Canteen and Soldiers' Barracks
Circa 1884 – Looking southwest in the New Fort, later known as Stanley Barracks. Several of the buildings shown in this photo were built in 1841 by the Royal Engineers. From left to right, the buildings originally served as the Officers’ Quarters (today known as Stanley Barracks), Officers’ Stables, Barrack Master’s Store, Canteen and Soldiers’ Barracks (City of Toronto Archives, Series 327, Sub Series 3, File 16)
November 13, 1931 - Looking east towards the west entrance gates and buildings inside Stanley Barracks
November 13, 1931 – Looking east towards the west entrance gates and buildings inside Stanley Barracks (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1548, Series 393, Item 23629)
April 1951 - During the years 1946 until 1951, the buildings inside Stanley Barracks served as emergency public housing. Each building was identified with a letter, for example, A Block
April 1951 – During the years 1946 until 1951, the buildings inside Stanley Barracks served as emergency public housing. Each building was identified with a letter, for example, A Block (Toronto Public Library R-2736)
2022 - Looking southeast towards Stanley Barracks and Hotel X Toronto at Exhibition Place. Stanley Barracks was originally the Officers' Quarters and one of seven limestone buildings in the New Fort, constructed by the Royal Engineers
2022 – Looking southeast towards Stanley Barracks and Hotel X Toronto at Exhibition Place. Stanley Barracks was originally the Officers’ Quarters and one of seven limestone buildings in the New Fort, constructed by the Royal Engineers
2023 - Stanley Barracks is located at 115 Princes' Blvd at Toronto's Exhibition Place in Toronto. The beautifully restored building received heritage status in 1973
2023 – Stanley Barracks is located at 115 Princes’ Blvd at Toronto’s Exhibition Place in Toronto. The beautifully restored building received heritage status in 1973
1918 - Troop drill marching by the arched passage which ran through the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks. Notice the Officers' Quarters, today known as Stanley Barracks, in the background
1918 – Troop drill marching by the arched passage which ran through the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks. Notice the Officers’ Quarters, today known as Stanley Barracks, in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 790)
April 14, 1925 – The Royal Canadian Dragoons, Canada's most senior cavalry regiment, leaving Stanley Barracks through the arch passage in the East Enlisted Mens' Barracks
April 14, 1925 – The Royal Canadian Dragoons, Canada’s most senior cavalry regiment, leaving Stanley Barracks through the arch passage in the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 4985)
2022 – The east and north facades of Stanley Barracks at Toronto's Exhibition Place. The landscaped gardens are available to rent for large outdoor events
2022 – The east and north facades of Stanley Barracks at Toronto’s Exhibition Place. The landscaped gardens are available to rent for large outdoor events
2023 - The heritage plaque reads:

Stanley Barracks

"The British army established a military post here in 1840-41 to replace aging Fort York. Known as the New Fort, it consisted of seven limestone buildings around a parade square and a number of lesser structures. Massive defensive works were planned for the perimeter but never built. In 1893, the fort was renamed Stanley Barracks in honour of Governor Lord Stanley. Canadian forces assumed responsibility for the post in 1870 and garrisoned it until 1947. The barracks then served as public housing until the early 1950s, when all but this building, the Officers' Quarters, were demolished."

Ontario Heritage Foundation, Ministry of Culture, Tourism and Recreation
2023 – The heritage plaque reads:

Stanley Barracks

“The British army established a military post here in 1840-41 to replace aging Fort York. Known as the New Fort, it consisted of seven limestone buildings around a parade square and a number of lesser structures. Massive defensive works were planned for the perimeter but never built. In 1893, the fort was renamed Stanley Barracks in honour of Governor Lord Stanley. Canadian forces assumed responsibility for the post in 1870 and garrisoned it until 1947. The barracks then served as public housing until the early 1950s, when all but this building, the Officers’ Quarters, were demolished.”

Ontario Heritage Foundation, Ministry of Culture, Tourism and Recreation
Circa 1867 - Two men and a horse-drawn carriage at the west side entrance of the Officers' Barracks (today's Stanley Barracks) in the New Fort. Notice the East Enlisted Mens' Barracks in the background
Circa 1867 – Two men and a horse-drawn carriage at the west side entrance of the Officers’ Barracks (today’s Stanley Barracks) in the New Fort. Notice the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks in the background (Toronto Public Library R-3029)
2022 – The west façade of the Stanley Barracks with Hotel X Toronto in the background at Exhibition Place
2022 – The west façade of the Stanley Barracks with Hotel X Toronto in the background at Exhibition Place
2022 - Arched stairs that bridge the moat on the east side of Stanley Barracks. The building has a total of six arched stairs
2022 – Arched stairs that bridge the moat on the east side of Stanley Barracks. The building has a total of six arched stairs
2022 – The south and east facades of Stanley Barracks with the Enercare Centre in the background on the right at Exhibition Place
2022 – The south and east facades of Stanley Barracks with the Enercare Centre in the background on the right at Exhibition Place
Between 1899 and 1918 - General French and the staff of the Stanley Barracks office
Between 1899 and 1918 – General French and the staff of the Stanley Barracks office (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1587, Series 409, Item 22)
2022 – One of two entrances on the north side of Stanley Barracks. Arched stairs bridge the moat that leads to the door
2022 – One of two entrances on the north side of Stanley Barracks. Arched stairs bridge the moat that leads to the door
Circa 1884 - Looking northeast in the New Fort towards the Orderly Room on the left and the East Enlisted Mens' Barracks on the right. The park area in the centre was known as Parade Square
Circa 1884 – Looking northeast in the New Fort towards the Orderly Room on the left and the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks on the right. The park area in the centre was known as Parade Square (City of Toronto Archives, Series 327, Sub Series 3, File 17)
April 21, 1914 - An aerial view looking east toward the New Fort and Toronto Bay with the Island in the distance
April 21, 1914 – An aerial view looking east toward the New Fort and Toronto Bay with the Island in the distance (Toronto Public Library TSPA-0114334F)
April 17, 1946 - The arched passage through the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks to enter the fort. The photo was captioned, "Mayor expects army will vacate." This was the year that Stanley Barracks was converted into emergency public housing
April 17, 1946 – The arched passage through the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks to enter the fort. The photo was captioned, “Mayor expects army will vacate.” This was the year that Stanley Barracks was converted into emergency public housing (Toronto Public Library TSPA-0114328F)
Circa 1950 - Looking northeast towards the East Enlisted Mens' Barracks at Stanley Barracks on the Exhibition grounds. This was one of seven limestone buildings constructed by the Royal Engineers in 1841 and was a part of the New Fort. Between 1946 and 1951, the buildings at Stanley Barracks were converted to emergency public housing. The building was demolished, and today, its foundation ruins are on display under the canopied walkway leading to Hotel X Toronto from Princes' Blvd
Circa 1950 – Looking northeast towards the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks at Stanley Barracks on the Exhibition grounds. This was one of seven limestone buildings constructed by the Royal Engineers in 1841 and was a part of the New Fort. Between 1946 and 1951, the buildings at Stanley Barracks were converted to emergency public housing. The building was demolished, and today, its foundation ruins are on display under the canopied walkway leading to Hotel X Toronto from Princes’ Blvd (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 380, Item 146)
2022 - Looking northeast from Parade Gardens towards the canopied walkway (the white steel frame structure) that leads to Hotel X Toronto. The canopy represents the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks that once stood on the site, and the building's ruins are on display underneath the structure. The concrete area in the foreground was originally called Parade Square and was a part of the New Fort that was built in 1841. Notice the Enercare Centre on the left
2022 – Looking northeast from Parade Gardens towards the canopied walkway (the white steel frame structure) that leads to Hotel X Toronto. The canopy represents the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks that once stood on the site, and the building’s ruins are on display underneath the structure. The concrete area in the foreground was originally called Parade Square and was a part of the New Fort that was built in 1841. Notice the Enercare Centre on the left
2022 - Looking southeast towards the white canopied walkway and the 30-storey Hotel X Toronto at Exhibition Place. Notice the top of the CN Tower in the background on the left
2022 – Looking southeast towards the white canopied walkway and the 30-storey Hotel X Toronto at Exhibition Place. Notice the top of the CN Tower in the background on the left
2022 – The canopied entrance to Hotel X from Princes’ Blvd features an elevated walkway that passes over the preserved foundations of the north portion of the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks
2022 – The canopied entrance to Hotel X from Princes’ Blvd features an elevated walkway that passes over the preserved foundations of the north portion of the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks
2022 – A view from the elevated walkway under the canopy entrance to Hotel X Toronto at Exhibition Place. The foundation ruins of the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks were exposed when the parking lot was excavated for an archaeological dig prior to the construction of the hotel
2022 – A view from the elevated walkway under the canopy entrance to Hotel X Toronto at Exhibition Place. The foundation ruins of the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks were exposed when the parking lot was excavated for an archaeological dig prior to the construction of the hotel
2022 – A bridge beneath the ornamental canopy at Hotel X Toronto spans the limestone foundation ruins of the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks. The barracks were part of the New Fort built in 1841 and were discovered and exposed during archaeological digs from 2004 to 2012
2022 – A bridge beneath the ornamental canopy at Hotel X Toronto spans the limestone foundation ruins of the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks. The barracks were part of the New Fort built in 1841 and were discovered and exposed during archaeological digs from 2004 to 2012
2022 – Along with the foundation ruins of the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks discovered and exposed during archaeological digs from 2004 to 2012, there were also many fascinating artifacts found. They include medallions, buttons, medicine bottles, coins, pocket knives, marbles, clay pipe bowls and more
2022 – Along with the foundation ruins of the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks discovered and exposed during archaeological digs from 2004 to 2012, there were also many fascinating artifacts found. They include medallions, buttons, medicine bottles, coins, pocket knives, marbles, clay pipe bowls and more
2022 - Looking southwest towards the canopied walkway at Hotel X Toronto with the historic Stanley Barracks in the background. The white steel frame structure represents the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks, a limestone building that once stood there
2022 – Looking southwest towards the canopied walkway at Hotel X Toronto with the historic Stanley Barracks in the background. The white steel frame structure represents the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks, a limestone building that once stood there
2022 – Looking southwest towards the Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto. There are beautifully landscaped gardens with park benches surrounding the historic building
2022 – Looking southwest towards the Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto. There are beautifully landscaped gardens with park benches surrounding the historic building
2022 - Looking southeast towards Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto. The area between the gates and Stanley Barracks is today called Parade Gardens. It's named after the New Fort's Parade Square that was once on that spot
2022 – Looking southeast towards Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto. The area between the gates and Stanley Barracks is today called Parade Gardens. It’s named after the New Fort’s Parade Square that was once on that spot
Between 1940 and 1950s - Looking northeast towards Stanley Barracks. The building served many purposes over the years. Originally the Officers' Barracks, it later served as public housing, museums, a restaurant and offices
Between 1940 and 1950s – Looking northeast towards Stanley Barracks. The building served many purposes over the years. Originally the Officers’ Barracks, it later served as public housing, museums, a restaurant and offices (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 742)
1965 – Looking northeast from the parking lot that once surrounded Stanley Barracks. From 1959 until 2000, the barracks were home to the Marine Museum of Upper Canada. Notice the Cattle Pavilion/Industry Building in the background on the left. Its stone entryway is now the stone entrance to Enercare Centre’s Exhibit Halls C and D. Also, notice Canadian National’s 4-8-4 Northern #6213 steam locomotive in the background on the right. It was relocated and is on display at the Toronto Railway Museum in Roundhouse Park
1965 – Looking northeast from the parking lot that once surrounded Stanley Barracks. From 1959 until 2000, the barracks were home to the Marine Museum of Upper Canada. Notice the Cattle Pavilion/Industry Building in the background on the left. Its stone entryway is now the stone entrance to Enercare Centre’s Exhibit Halls C and D. Also, notice Canadian National’s 4-8-4 Northern #6213 steam locomotive in the background on the right. It was relocated and is on display at the Toronto Railway Museum in Roundhouse Park (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 333, Item 1)
2022 – Looking towards the west and south facades of Stanley Barracks with Hotel X Toronto in the background at Exhibition Place. The gardens on the south side of the barracks are called Stanley Gardens
2022 – Looking towards the west and south facades of Stanley Barracks with Hotel X Toronto in the background at Exhibition Place. The gardens on the south side of the barracks are called Stanley Gardens
2022 – Looking east towards the south side of Stanley Barracks and Gardens with Hotel X Toronto in the background
2022 – Looking east towards the south side of Stanley Barracks and Gardens with Hotel X Toronto in the background
Between 1914 and 1916 - In World War I, Stanley Barracks became an internment compound for immigrant Eastern European civilians thought to be “enemy aliens.” Also, Exhibition grounds and its buildings were used by the Canadian Armed Forces during this time
Between 1914 and 1916 – In World War I, Stanley Barracks became an internment compound for immigrant Eastern European civilians thought to be “enemy aliens.” Also, Exhibition grounds and its buildings were used by the Canadian Armed Forces during this time (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, File 866)
2020 - The plaque reads: 

"Thousands of Ukrainians and other Europeans were needlessly imprisoned as "enemy aliens" during Canada's national internment operations of 1914-1920. The Stanley Barracks Receiving Station was used for this purpose between 14 December 1914 and 2 October 1916. Stanley Barracks, Constructed in 1841 to replace Fort York, stood on this site until 1953. Only the Officers' Quarters remain, located due south of this plaque."

Placed by the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association and the Ukrainian Canadian community of Ontario, in co-operation with the Ukrainian Canadian Foundation of Taras Shevchenko.

2 October 1998
2020 – The plaque reads:

“Thousands of Ukrainians and other Europeans were needlessly imprisoned as “enemy aliens” during Canada’s national internment operations of 1914-1920. The Stanley Barracks Receiving Station was used for this purpose between 14 December 1914 and 2 October 1916. Stanley Barracks, Constructed in 1841 to replace Fort York, stood on this site until 1953. Only the Officers’ Quarters remain, located due south of this plaque.”

Placed by the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association and the Ukrainian Canadian community of Ontario, in co-operation with the Ukrainian Canadian Foundation of Taras Shevchenko.

2 October 1998
2020 - Looking south from Parade Gardens towards geodesic exercise pods, set up in front of Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto
2020 – Looking south from Parade Gardens towards geodesic exercise pods, set up in front of Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto
2021 - Looking southwest towards Stanley Barracks and its heritage plaque at Exhibition Place in Toronto. Constructed in 1841 by the Royal Engineers, the building was part of the New Fort. In 1870, ownership of Fort York and the New Fort was transferred to the Dominion Government of Canada when the British Army permanently withdrew from the country
2021 – Looking southwest towards Stanley Barracks and its heritage plaque at Exhibition Place in Toronto. Constructed in 1841 by the Royal Engineers, the building was part of the New Fort. In 1870, ownership of Fort York and the New Fort was transferred to the Dominion Government of Canada when the British Army permanently withdrew from the country
2022 - Looking southwest towards the Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto. Built in 1841, the first units stationed at the New Fort (later known as Stanley Barracks) included the 93rd Sutherland Highlanders, the 71st and the Royal Canadian Rifles. Other units posted at the barracks were the 16th and 30th Regiment of Foot, the Royal Artillery, the 13th Hussars, Infantry School Corps “C” company and the Royal Canadian Dragoons
2022 – Looking southwest towards the Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto. Built in 1841, the first units stationed at the New Fort (later known as Stanley Barracks) included the 93rd Sutherland Highlanders, the 71st and the Royal Canadian Rifles. Other units posted at the barracks were the 16th and 30th Regiment of Foot, the Royal Artillery, the 13th Hussars, Infantry School Corps “C” company and the Royal Canadian Dragoons
April 1951 - Looking east into Stanley Barracks from the west side gate. Notice the structure on the right appears to be missing its roof. By the 1950s, the buildings still standing in Stanley Barracks were so neglected that they had to be torn down until all that was left was the Officers’ Quarters, which have become commonly known as Stanley Barracks
April 1951 – Looking east into Stanley Barracks from the west side gate. Notice the structure on the right appears to be missing its roof. By the 1950s, the buildings still standing in Stanley Barracks were so neglected that they had to be torn down until all that was left was the Officers’ Quarters, which have become commonly known as Stanley Barracks (Toronto Public Library R-2734)
2021 - Looking southeast towards Stanley Barracks and Hotel X at Exhibition Place in Toronto. From 1841 until 1893, what we know today as Stanley Barracks was once part of a large military post called the New Fort to differentiate it from Fort York. The New Fort was renamed Stanley Barracks in honour of Governor General Lord Frederick Stanley. It was also Lord Stanley who donated the NHL’s most prized cup
2021 – Looking southeast towards Stanley Barracks and Hotel X at Exhibition Place in Toronto. From 1841 until 1893, what we know today as Stanley Barracks was once part of a large military post called the New Fort to differentiate it from Fort York. The New Fort was renamed Stanley Barracks in honour of Governor General Lord Frederick Stanley. It was also Lord Stanley who donated the NHL’s most prized cup
Between 1978 and 1987 – Looking northeast towards Lake Shore Blvd W, Stanley Barracks when it was home to the Marine Museum and Bulova (Shell Oil) Tower. Notice on the left Ned Hanlan tugboat and the Flyer roller coaster. On the right is a domed tower from the Coliseum and the Canadian National’s 4-8-4 Northern #6213 steam locomotive
Between 1978 and 1987 – Looking northeast towards Lake Shore Blvd W, Stanley Barracks when it was home to the Marine Museum and Bulova (Shell Oil) Tower. Notice on the left Ned Hanlan tugboat and the Flyer roller coaster. On the right is a domed tower from the Coliseum and the Canadian National’s 4-8-4 Northern #6213 steam locomotive (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 628, Item 4)
2022 – Looking north towards Stanley Gardens and Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto. On the right is the white canopied walkway to Hotel X Toronto, and the green glass tower in the background is part of the Enercare Centre
2022 – Looking north towards Stanley Gardens and Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto. On the right is the white canopied walkway to Hotel X Toronto, and the green glass tower in the background is part of the Enercare Centre
Between 1984 and 1990 – Looking northwest from Lake Shore Blvd W towards Stanley Barracks. Notice the former Exhibition Stadium & Grandstand in the centre
Between 1984 and 1990 – Looking northwest from Lake Shore Blvd W towards Stanley Barracks. Notice the former Exhibition Stadium & Grandstand in the centre (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 416, Item 9)
2022 - Looking northwest towards Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place. The limestone building is surrounded by a dry moat
2022 – Looking northwest towards Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place. The limestone building is surrounded by a dry moat
1930 - Looking northeast from Lake Ontario towards Stanley Barracks. Notice how close the shore once was to the barracks
1930 – Looking northeast from Lake Ontario towards Stanley Barracks. Notice how close the shore once was to the barracks (Toronto Public Library R-2467)
1939 - An aerial view looking north over Stanley Barracks. Notice the Officers' Quarters, today known as Stanley Barracks, in the centre and all the buildings once in the fort. At the top of the photo is the TTC loop once in front of the Coliseum Complex
1939 – An aerial view looking north over Stanley Barracks. Notice the Officers’ Quarters, today known as Stanley Barracks, in the centre and all the buildings once in the fort. At the top of the photo is the TTC loop once in front of the Coliseum Complex (CNE Archives)
Circa 1950 - Looking northeast towards Stanley Barracks. Notice the building is looking worn, and the windows are boarded up. The Officers’ Barracks (today known as Stanley Barracks) narrowly escaped demolition in the mid-1950s. Also, notice the cannons on the south lawn
Circa 1950 – Looking northeast towards Stanley Barracks. Notice the building is looking worn, and the windows are boarded up. The Officers’ Barracks (today known as Stanley Barracks) narrowly escaped demolition in the mid-1950s. Also, notice the cannons on the south lawn (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 380, Item 147)
2021 - Looking northeast towards Stanley Barracks. The building, originally the Officers’ Barracks, is all that remains today of a once expansive military establishment known as the New Fort
2021 – Looking northeast towards Stanley Barracks. The building, originally the Officers’ Barracks, is all that remains today of a once expansive military establishment known as the New Fort
1921 - "B" Squadron, Royal Canadian Dragoons soccer team at Stanley Barracks
1921 – “B” Squadron, Royal Canadian Dragoons soccer team at Stanley Barracks (Library and Archives Canada PA-060089)
December 16, 1922 - Deaths head caution sign for motorists at Stanley Barracks. The building in the background is the East Enlisted Mens' Barracks. Today, the foundation ruins of the East Enlisted Mens' Barracks are covered by a white steel frame canopy
December 16, 1922 – Deaths head caution sign for motorists at Stanley Barracks. The building in the background is the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks. Today, the foundation ruins of the East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks are covered by a white steel frame canopy (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1548, Series 393, Item 17866)
1923 - The photo is captioned: "View on part of Stanley Barracks from top of switch-back. Lake Ontario and Island in distance"
1923 – The photo is captioned: “View on part of Stanley Barracks from top of switch-back. Lake Ontario and Island in distance” (Toronto Public Library OHQ-PICTURES-S-R-639)
1923 - Sergeant Soyger of the Royal Canadian Dragoons at Stanley Barracks with the Coliseum in the background
1923 – Sergeant Soyger of the Royal Canadian Dragoons at Stanley Barracks with the Coliseum in the background (Library and Archives Canada PA-060079)
August 1, 1925 – A view of the Exhibition track, the south area of Stanley Barracks and Lake Ontario from the roof of the Grandstand at Exhibition grounds
August 1, 1925 – A view of the Exhibition track, the south area of Stanley Barracks and Lake Ontario from the roof of the Grandstand at Exhibition grounds (Toronto Public Library TSPA_0114337F)
June 24, 1927 - Military buildings once at Stanley Barracks
June 24, 1927 – Military buildings once at Stanley Barracks (Toronto Public Library TSPA_0114332F)
1931 - An aerial view looking northwest towards Stanley Barracks and Exhibition grounds. The building in the foreground is the Officers' Barracks, or what we know today as Stanley Barracks. In the background, from left to right, are Exhibition Stadium & Grandstand, the Horse Palace and the Coliseum
1931 – An aerial view looking northwest towards Stanley Barracks and Exhibition grounds. The building in the foreground is the Officers’ Barracks, or what we know today as Stanley Barracks. In the background, from left to right, are Exhibition Stadium & Grandstand, the Horse Palace and the Coliseum (Library and Archives Canada PA-060367)
1933 - Royal Canadian Dragoons Musical Ride in Parade Square (in front of the Orderly Room) at Stanley Barracks. Notice the Coliseum Complex in the background
1933 – Royal Canadian Dragoons Musical Ride in Parade Square (in front of the Orderly Room) at Stanley Barracks. Notice the Coliseum Complex in the background (Library and Archives Canada PA-060263)
September 28, 1940 – The Locke and Hollinger wedding at the chapel at the Stanley Barracks
September 28, 1940 – The Locke and Hollinger wedding at the chapel at the Stanley Barracks (City of Toronto Archives, Globe and Mail Fonds, Fonds 1266, Item 69288)
August 9, 1947 - From 1946 to 1951, the buildings at Stanley Barracks were used for emergency public housing. In 1947, there was a polio outbreak throughout much of the country. Cases were rising in Toronto and in the very crowded quarters of Stanley Barracks, with various buildings placed under quarantine
August 9, 1947 – From 1946 to 1951, the buildings at Stanley Barracks were used for emergency public housing. In 1947, there was a polio outbreak throughout much of the country. Cases were rising in Toronto and in the very crowded quarters of Stanley Barracks, with various buildings placed under quarantine (City of Toronto Archives, Globe and Mail Fonds, Fonds 1266, Item 117576)
Circa 1950 - A boarded-up Stanley Barracks building. The heritage-designated building narrowly escaped demolition in the 1950s. Notice the cannons on the south lawn
Circa 1950 – A boarded-up Stanley Barracks building. The heritage-designated building narrowly escaped demolition in the 1950s. Notice the cannons on the south lawn (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 380, Item 145)
March 1951 - Looking northeast in Stanley Barracks towards the Chapel and the two-storey Orderly Room. The photo was taken near the west side entrance. The Orderly Room was one of the original limestone buildings constructed in 1942. It originally served as the fort's hospital
March 1951 – Looking northeast in Stanley Barracks towards the Chapel and the two-storey Orderly Room. The photo was taken near the west side entrance. The Orderly Room was one of the original limestone buildings constructed in 1942. It originally served as the fort’s hospital (Toronto Public Library R-2730)
1955 – Canada's Sports Hall of Fame was once located in the Stanley Barracks at Exhibition grounds. It was only open during the CNE. The Hockey Hall of Fame also featured displays there
1955 – Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame was once located in the Stanley Barracks at Exhibition grounds. It was only open during the CNE. The Hockey Hall of Fame also featured displays there (Courtesy of the Canadian National Exhibition Association Archives)
1955 – Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in the Stanley Barracks, the year it was established. They invited the Hockey Hall of Fame to set up an exhibit
1955 – Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame in the Stanley Barracks, the year it was established. They invited the Hockey Hall of Fame to set up an exhibit (Courtesy of the Canadian National Exhibition Association Archives)
August 20, 1972 - Looking southeast from the Shell Oil Tower with a view of the Marine Museum (today known as Stanley Barracks), a parking lot and Lake Ontario. Also, notice the Edward "Ned" Hanlan statue and Canadian National’s 4-8-4 Northern #6213 steam locomotive. The statue has been relocated and is on display at Hanlan's Point ferry dock, and the locomotive to the Toronto Railway Museum in Roundhouse Park
August 20, 1972 – Looking southeast from the Shell Oil Tower with a view of the Marine Museum (today known as Stanley Barracks), a parking lot and Lake Ontario. Also, notice the Edward “Ned” Hanlan statue and Canadian National’s 4-8-4 Northern #6213 steam locomotive. The statue has been relocated and is on display at Hanlan’s Point ferry dock, and the locomotive to the Toronto Railway Museum in Roundhouse Park (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 94, Item 19)
Between 1980 and 1998 – Looking east towards the Ned Hanlan tugboat and Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place with the CN Tower in the background. The tugboat has been relocated and is on display at Hanlan's Point ferry docks
Between 1980 and 1998 – Looking east towards the Ned Hanlan tugboat and Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place with the CN Tower in the background. The tugboat has been relocated and is on display at Hanlan’s Point ferry docks (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 144, Item 3)
2022 – Looking south towards the water fountains in Parade Gardens at Stanley Barracks
2022 – Looking south towards the water fountains in Parade Gardens at Stanley Barracks
1900 - Looking northwest from Parade Square toward the (west) Soldiers Barracks at Stanley Barracks. The building was one of seven limestone buildings constructed in 1841 by the Royal Engineers as a part of the New Fort. The building was demolished, and all that remains of the New Fort is the Officers' Quarters, today known as Stanley Barracks. Notice the Exhibition's switch-back, an early form of a roller coaster, in the background
1900 – Looking northwest from Parade Square toward the (west) Soldiers Barracks at Stanley Barracks. The building was one of seven limestone buildings constructed in 1841 by the Royal Engineers as a part of the New Fort. The building was demolished, and all that remains of the New Fort is the Officers’ Quarters, today known as Stanley Barracks. Notice the Exhibition’s switch-back, an early form of a roller coaster, in the background (Toronto Public Library R-3036)
1922 - Looking northwest from parade square toward the Royal Canadian Dragoons and the (west) Soldiers Barracks at Stanley Barracks. Today, these grounds are part of Exhibition Place
1922 – Looking northwest from parade square toward the Royal Canadian Dragoons and the (west) Soldiers Barracks at Stanley Barracks. Today, these grounds are part of Exhibition Place (Toronto Public Library R-2846)
2023 - A view looking southeast towards the canopied walkway, Hotel X Toronto and Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto
2023 – A view looking southeast towards the canopied walkway, Hotel X Toronto and Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto
2022 - Looking southeast towards the white steel frame canopy at Hotel X Toronto in Exhibition Place. The structure features artwork panels over the foundation ruins and represents the form of the original East Enlisted Mens' Barracks building that once stood on the site
2022 – Looking southeast towards the white steel frame canopy at Hotel X Toronto in Exhibition Place. The structure features artwork panels over the foundation ruins and represents the form of the original East Enlisted Mens’ Barracks building that once stood on the site
2023 - 93rd Sutherland Highlanders emblem on the canopied walkway walls at Toronto's Exhibition Place. The 93rd Sutherland Highlanders were one of the first units stationed at the New Fort in the early 1840s
2023 – 93rd Sutherland Highlanders emblem on the canopied walkway walls at Toronto’s Exhibition Place. The 93rd Sutherland Highlanders were one of the first units stationed at the New Fort in the early 1840s
2023 - Infantry School Corps "C" company emblem on the canopy at Exhibition Place. The school moved into the barracks in 1884. The regiment garrisoned Toronto until 1939 and is known today as The Royal Canadian Regiment
2023 – Infantry School Corps “C” company emblem on the canopy at Exhibition Place. The school moved into the barracks in 1884. The regiment garrisoned Toronto until 1939 and is known today as The Royal Canadian Regiment
2023 - North-West Mounted Police emblem on the canopy wall at Exhibition Place in Toronto. The North-West Mounted Police (the forerunner to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police) assembled and trained recruits at the barracks in 1874 and in 1881
2023 – North-West Mounted Police emblem on the canopy wall at Exhibition Place in Toronto. The North-West Mounted Police (the forerunner to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police) assembled and trained recruits at the barracks in 1874 and in 1881
2022 - The emblem of the Royal Canadian Dragoons on the walls of the steel frame canopy with Stanley Barracks in the background at Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Dragoons were one of the units stationed at the New Fort, later known as Stanley Barracks
2022 – The emblem of the Royal Canadian Dragoons on the walls of the steel frame canopy with Stanley Barracks in the background at Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Dragoons were one of the units stationed at the New Fort, later known as Stanley Barracks
2022 – One of the units stationed at the New Fort was the 16th Regiment of Foot. Their emblem is one of several featured on the walls of the canopied walkway at Exhibition Place. Notice Stanley Barracks in the background
2022 – One of the units stationed at the New Fort was the 16th Regiment of Foot. Their emblem is one of several featured on the walls of the canopied walkway at Exhibition Place. Notice Stanley Barracks in the background
Circa 1841 – Birds eye view of the New Fort at Toronto, Upper Canada
Circa 1841 – Birds eye view of the New Fort at Toronto, Upper Canada (Archives of Ontario I0006706)
December 2, 1841 - Architectural drawing by Captain Vincent Biscoe of the (Great Britain) Army Corps of Royal Engineers
December 2, 1841 – Architectural drawing by Captain Vincent Biscoe of the (Great Britain) Army Corps of Royal Engineers (Library and Archives Canada e011068162)
1870 - Fort York (Old Fort) and Stanley Barracks (New Fort) being handed over from the Royal Engineers to the Dominion Government of Canada when the British Army permanently withdrew from the country
1870 – Fort York (Old Fort) and Stanley Barracks (New Fort) being handed over from the Royal Engineers to the Dominion Government of Canada when the British Army permanently withdrew from the country (Library and Archives Canada NMC23157)
1884 - Goads Map showing the location of the Industrial Exhibition and the New Fort. Notice the amount of space each occupied at the time
1884 – Goads Map showing the location of the Industrial Exhibition and the New Fort. Notice the amount of space each occupied at the time (Toronto Public Library)
January 8, 1894 - General plan of the Stanley Barracks by Major Lawrence Buchan, Royal Regiment of Canadian Infantry. The brick structures are shown in pink, stone structures in blue and wooden structures in yellow
January 8, 1894 – General plan of the Stanley Barracks by Major Lawrence Buchan, Royal Regiment of Canadian Infantry. The brick structures are shown in pink, stone structures in blue and wooden structures in yellow (Library and Archives Canada e011068161)
A 2023 map overlaid with an 1884 Goads map showing the footprint of the New Fort as compared to the present day. In today’s terms, the fort extended to: Heritage Court on the north, approximately Newfoundland Dr on the southeast, Lake Shore Blvd W on the south and the east bridge to Ontario Place on the southwest
A 2023 map overlaid with an 1884 Goads map showing the footprint of the New Fort as compared to the present day. In today’s terms, the fort extended to: Heritage Court on the north, approximately Newfoundland Dr on the southeast, Lake Shore Blvd W on the south and the east bridge to Ontario Place on the southwest (Google Maps & Toronto Public Library)
2021 - The heritage plaque reads:

North-West Mounted Police

"During April and May 1874, North-West Mounted Police Commissioner George Arthur French hired 150 men and assembled them at New Fort (Stanley Barracks) in Toronto. The recruits performed drills on horseback, organized equipment, and trained with two nine-pounder field guns in preparation for their journey to western Canada. On June 6, 1874, they left by train to join the March West with the goal of establishing Canada's sovereignty and laws in the North-West Territories."

Heritage Toronto 2016
2021 – The heritage plaque reads:

North-West Mounted Police

“During April and May 1874, North-West Mounted Police Commissioner George Arthur French hired 150 men and assembled them at New Fort (Stanley Barracks) in Toronto. The recruits performed drills on horseback, organized equipment, and trained with two nine-pounder field guns in preparation for their journey to western Canada. On June 6, 1874, they left by train to join the March West with the goal of establishing Canada’s sovereignty and laws in the North-West Territories.”

Heritage Toronto 2016
2022 – The Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto
2022 – The Stanley Barracks at Exhibition Place in Toronto
SOURCE

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