Scadding Cabin – Toronto’s Oldest Home & A Glimpse Into Pioneer Life

2022 - Scadding Cabin is located at the southwest corner of Exhibition Place
2022 – Scadding Cabin is located at the southwest corner of Exhibition Place

The Scadding Cabin is located at 3 Alberta Circle, near the southwest corner of Exhibition Place in Toronto. The cabin is in an area known as the “Historic Mile” near the Fort Rouillé Monument, the Stanley Barracks and Fort York.

John Scadding – One of York’s Earliest Settlers

In 1792, John Scadding left his home of Devonshire, England, to assist his close friend, Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe, with the newly created Province of Upper Canada (present-day Ontario). Arriving in what we know today as Niagara-on-the-Lake, establishments were set up there and in York (present-day Toronto).

In 1793, the Crown granted John Scadding, who served as Clerk/Secretary to Lieutenant Governor Simcoe, a 253-acre piece of land in York. Designated as Lot 15, it was bounded by Lake Ontario to the south, the Don River to the west, Danforth Ave to the north and Broadview Ave to the east. The piece of land featured not only densely wooded steep hills of mainly white pine but also marshes. Although the land was rugged, it was also picturesque, with views of the lake and the then-winding Don River. Rich with wildlife, the waters had rock bass, perch and pike, while the land had grouse, quail, fox, muskrats, mink, snakes, turtles and more.

Settlement Duties

1795 - The Scadding Cabin, south of Queen St E and bridge over the Don River, from a sketch by Elizabeth Simco
1795 – The Scadding Cabin, south of Queen St E and bridge over the Don River, from a sketch by Elizabeth Simcoe (1880s watercolour – Toronto Public Library R-1527)

In 1794 and as part of his settlement obligations, Scadding constructed a cabin and a large barn on the property. The Scadding Cabin originally stood on the east side of the Don River and the south side of present-day Queen St E. It’s made of rough-cut pine timbers with dovetailed corners. It also has wooden shingles and a stone hearth. That cabin is Toronto’s oldest known surviving structure.

Due to troubling times, the ailing Lieutenant Governor and the threat of war, Scadding returned to England with Simcoe in 1796. Scadding didn’t finish his plan to create a homestead for his future family and cultivate the land. During his time back in England, John married Melicent Triggs. They had three sons – John, Charles and Henry Scadding.

In 1818, John returned to Canada without his family to make improvements to Lot 15. He sold the 1794-built log cabin and a few acres of property around the structure to a farmer named John Smith. With the proceeds, Scadding built a larger home north of the original cabin but still on Lot 15. It was located on the east side of the Don River, just north of Gerrard St E. When he brought his family to Canada between 1819 to 1821, that was the home they lived in. Since demolished, it was on the site of the Old Don Jail.

The Scadding Farm

The Scadding’s worked to tame the land, which was considered far remote from town. There were grain fields on the homestead, including wheat, barley and oats, orchards with fruit trees and rows of corn. The flatlands were transformed into meadows for sheep and other grazing animals.

In 1824, while workers were felling trees on the property, a nearly cut-through tree struck John Scadding. He succumbed to his injuries shortly after. Scadding was known as one who could “walk with kings nor lose the common touch.”

Sale of the Northern Portion of Lot 15

In 1856, the northern portion of the Scadding Farm was sold to the City of Toronto. Then, just beyond the city limits, 119 acres of property were purchased to secure a site for the House of Refuge, a hospice for the “poor, needy and disabled,” and a new prison known today as the Old Don Jail. Prisoners of the jail worked an Industrial Farm on the property the Scadding family initially cultivated. The site today is also home to Riverdale Park East.

York Pioneer and Historical Society

In 1869, the York Pioneer and Historical Society was founded at the Mechanics’ Institute, once at the northeast corner of Church and Adelaide Sts. Its purpose was “to keep alive reminiscences of a primitive day and of making collections of them before they became lost.” The founding member and president of the Society was Dr Henry Scadding. During a meeting in 1879, society member John Smith (son of farmer William Smith) offered to donate the old Scadding Cabin to the York Pioneers as it was an “interesting relic of the past.”

Moving the Scadding Cabin to Exhibition Grounds

1879 - The York Pioneers on their way to Exhibition grounds to reconstruct the Scadding Cabin
1879 – The York Pioneers on their way to Exhibition grounds to reconstruct the Scadding Cabin (Toronto Public Library R-2683)

That same year, the York Pioneers dismantled the cabin and, with a cart and oxen, hauled the cabin pieces to Exhibition grounds, where they reconstructed it. Then known as the Simcoe Cabin, it was a part of the celebrations of the first CNE, which was the Toronto Industrial Exhibition at the time. Since then, the cabin/museum has been owned and maintained by the York Pioneer and Historical Society.

In 1901, churchman Dr Henry Scadding passed away. To honour his service to the York Pioneers and for being one of Toronto’s early historians, the Simcoe Cabin was renamed Scadding Cabin.

In the late 1950s, the building was raised and placed on a foundation. The City gave this first-generation Toronto building heritage status in 1989.

The Scadding Cabin is outfitted with pioneer furnishings used by early settlers of York from the 1830s to the early 1840s. Artifacts include a Windsor chair, spinning wheels, a candle mold, bread and butter making equipment, a wool winder and utensils for cooking on an open hearth. More information on this piece of Toronto’s history can be found at York Pioneer and Historical Society.

Did You Know?

  • While John Scadding was away in England from 1796 to 1818, John Playter and his family occupied the original log cabin and looked after Mr Scadding’s interests. Eldest son of John Scadding, John Jr later married the daughter of Mr Playter, Amelia.
  • John Scadding was considered a top agriculturist in England.
  • In the early 1820s, John Scadding purchased the adjacent lot on the west side of the Don, which had been granted to Lieutenant Governor Simcoe. Named after Simcoe’s son Francis, debris from Castle Frank was used to add a lean-to (addition) on the second Scadding home as a study for the future Toronto historiographer, Dr Henry Scadding.
  • The first bridge (a wooden structure) over the Don River at Queen St E (once known as Kingston Rd) was called Scadding’s Bridge well into the 1800s. Today it’s known as Riverside Bridge or the Queen Street Viaduct.
  • Broadview Ave was once known as Mill Rd.
  • When the historic cabin was brought to Exhibition grounds in 1879, there was also a second cabin called the “Lorne.” It was named after the Governor-General of Canada, the Marquis of Lorne. Because the Lorne Cabin was made of green lumber, it decayed quickly and did not survive for long.
  • The Historic Mile includes the Scadding Cabin (built in 1794), Fort Rouillé Monument (built in 1750/51 by the French as a trading post), the Stanley Barracks (built in 1841 and previously referred to as the New Fort) and Fort York (built in 1793).
  • Next to The Church of the Holy Trinity, beside the Eaton Centre in downtown Toronto, is the historic home of Reverend Dr Henry Scadding (son of John Scadding) called the Scadding House.
  • The heritage building, The Broadview Hotel (Dingman’s Hall), is located on a part of the land that was once granted to John Scadding.

Scadding Cabin Photos

2022 - Scadding Cabin is located at the southwest corner of Exhibition Place
2022 – Scadding Cabin is located at the southwest corner of Exhibition Place
2022 - An interior view of the Scadding Cabin at Exhibition Place
2022 – An interior view of the Scadding Cabin at Exhibition Place
1880s - The then Simcoe Cabin (later renamed the Scadding Cabin) and the Lorne Cabin at Exhibition grounds
1880s – The then Simcoe Cabin (later renamed the Scadding Cabin) and the Lorne Cabin at Exhibition grounds (CNE Archives)
1879 - The York Pioneers on their way to Exhibition grounds to reconstruct the Scadding Cabin
1879 – The York Pioneers on their way to Exhibition grounds to reconstruct the Scadding Cabin (Toronto Public Library R-2683)
1795 - The Scadding Cabin, south of Queen St E and bridge over the Don River, from a sketch by Elizabeth Simco
1795 – The Scadding Cabin, south of Queen St E and bridge over the Don River, from a sketch by Elizabeth Simcoe (1880s watercolour – Toronto Public Library R-1527)
2021 - The Scadding Cabin and the wind turbine at Exhibition Place, looking west
2021 – The Scadding Cabin and the wind turbine at Exhibition Place, looking west
1928 - The Scadding Cabin at Exhibition grounds, looking northwest
1928 – The Scadding Cabin at Exhibition grounds, looking northwest (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 6099)
1907 - A crowd at the Scadding Cabin during the Exhibition
1907 – A crowd at the Scadding Cabin during the Exhibition (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 272A)
1950s - JA Northley, CNE President with women in historical costumes
1950s – JA Northley, CNE President with women in historical costumes (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 3905)
2022 - A pitcher and basin next to the window, inside the Scadding Cabin
2022 – A pitcher and basin next to the window, inside the Scadding Cabin
2022 - Inside the Scadding Cabin is a hearth and traditional furniture. Also on display are items that were used during those times including a cradle, spinning wheel, wool winder, cooking utencils and more
2022 – Inside the Scadding Cabin is a hearth and traditional furniture. Also on display are items that were used during those times including a cradle, spinning wheel, wool winder, cooking utencils and more
2022 - Period furniture and tools on display, inside the Scadding Cabin at Exhibition Place
2022 – Period furniture and tools on display, inside the Scadding Cabin at Exhibition Place
2022 - Steps that lead to the attic Inside the Scadding Cabin. Also on display are many period tools
2022 – Steps that lead to the attic Inside the Scadding Cabin. Also on display are many period tools
2022 – The Scadding Family Tree on display inside the Scadding Cabin at the Exhibition Place
2022 – The Scadding Family Tree on display inside the Scadding Cabin at the Exhibition Place
2022 – Dovetail joints on the Scadding Cabin are sloped to drain rain-water to the exterior
2022 – Dovetail joints on the Scadding Cabin are sloped to drain rain-water to the exterior
2022 – A copy of the Toronto Purchase Treaty No. 13 (1805) was on display by the York Pioneer and Historical Society at the Scadding Cabin during the CNE
2022 – A copy of the Toronto Purchase Treaty No. 13 (1805) was on display by the York Pioneer and Historical Society at the Scadding Cabin during the CNE
2022 – During the CNE, the York Pioneer and Historical Society had a copy of the Toronto Purchase Treaty No. 13 (1805) on display at Scadding Cabin. More information on the Toronto Purchase Treaty No. 13 (1805) can be found on the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation website
2022 – During the CNE, the York Pioneer and Historical Society had a copy of the Toronto Purchase Treaty No. 13 (1805) on display at Scadding Cabin. More information on the Toronto Purchase Treaty No. 13 (1805) can be found on the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation website
1972 - The Scadding Cabin, looking southeast towards Lake Shore Blvd W and Ontario Place
1972 – The Scadding Cabin, looking southeast towards Lake Shore Blvd W and Ontario Place (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 94, Item 75)
2022 – Looking northwest towards the Scadding Cabin at the Exhibition Place during the CNE. The historic cabin was built in 1794
2022 – Looking northwest towards the Scadding Cabin at the Exhibition Place during the CNE. The historic cabin was built in 1794
2021 - The Scadding Cabin at Exhibition Place, looking west
2021 – The Scadding Cabin at Exhibition Place, looking west
2020 - Scadding Cabin sign at Exhibition Place
2020 – Scadding Cabin sign at Exhibition Place
2020 - Door of the Scadding Cabin
2020 – Door of the Scadding Cabin
1951 - Scadding Cabin sign
1951 – Scadding Cabin sign (Toronto Public Library R-2739)
2020 - The Scadding Cabin at Exhibition Place, looking northwest
2020 – The Scadding Cabin at Exhibition Place, looking northwest
2020 - The Scadding Cabin and wind turbine at Exhibition Place, during early Spring
2020 – The Scadding Cabin with the wind turbine in the at Exhibition Place, during early Spring
1925 - Fort Rouillé Monument with Scadding Cabin and the former Transportation Building in the background at Exhibition Place
1925 – Fort Rouillé Monument with Scadding Cabin and the former Transportation Building in the background at Exhibition Place (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 3779)
Circa 1915 - Soldiers march near the Fort Rouillé Monument and Scadding Cabin at Exhibition Camp. During World War I, Exhibition grounds were transformed into a military training and housing area
Circa 1915 – Soldiers march near the Fort Rouillé Monument and Scadding Cabin at Exhibition Camp. During World War I, Exhibition grounds were transformed into a military training and housing area (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 2277)
Circa 1900 - Looking west towards Fort Rouillé Monument and the Scadding Cabin at Exhibition grounds
Circa 1900 – Looking west towards Fort Rouillé Monument and the Scadding Cabin at Exhibition grounds (Toronto Public Library R-2469)
A vintage photo (circa 1901) on display inside the Scadding Cabin. In 1901, when Dr Henry Scadding passed away, the Simcoe Cabin was renamed in Dr Scadding's honour for his service to the York Pioneers and for being one of Toronto's early historians
A vintage photo (circa 1901) on display inside the Scadding Cabin. In 1901, when Dr Henry Scadding passed away, the Simcoe Cabin was renamed in Dr Scadding’s honour for his service to the York Pioneers and for being one of Toronto’s early historians
1880 - On the left is the commemorative boulder and former cairn marking the location of Fort Rouillé at Exhibition grounds. On the right are the Scadding Cabin (originally known as Simcoe Cabin) and the Lorne Cabin
1880 – On the left is the commemorative boulder and former cairn marking the location of Fort Rouillé at Exhibition grounds. On the right are the Scadding Cabin (originally known as Simcoe Cabin) and the Lorne Cabin (Toronto Public Library R-2685)
1950s - Brochure cover for Scadding Log Cabin
1950s – Brochure cover for Scadding Log Cabin
1950s - Inside brochure for Scadding Log Cabin
1950s – Inside brochure for Scadding Log Cabin
1800s - John Scadding's second home, east of the Don River and north of Gerrard St E, showing addition on right side of the home for son Henry, a future Toronto historian
1800s – John Scadding’s second home, east of the Don River and north of Gerrard St E, showing addition on right side of the home for son Henry, a future Toronto historian (1880s watercolour – Toronto Public Library R-5873)
1834 - A map of the City of Toronto and Liberties
1834 – A map of the City of Toronto and Liberties (Toronto Public Library R-137)
1819 - Town of York Inhabitants record
1819 – Town of York Inhabitants record (Toronto Public Library)
1795 - The Scadding Cabin, south of Queen St E and bridge over the Don River, from a sketch by Elizabeth Simcoe
1795 – The Scadding Cabin, south of Queen St E and bridge over the Don River, from a sketch by Elizabeth Simcoe (1924 sketch – Toronto Public Library R-1523)
2021 - Scadding Cabin heritage plaque
2021 – Scadding Cabin heritage plaque
2020 - The Scadding Cabin historical plaque on the Riverside Bridge
2020 – The Scadding Cabin historical plaque on the Riverside Bridge
2022 - Looking northeast towards the Riverside Bridge going over the Don River on Queen St E, near the site of the old Scadding Bridge and Cabin
2022 – Looking northeast towards the Riverside Bridge going over the Don River on Queen St E, near the site of the old Scadding Bridge and Cabin
2021 - Riverside Bridge on Queen St E going over the Don River, looking southeast, near the site of the old Scadding Bridge and Cabin
2021 – Riverside Bridge on Queen St E going over the Don River, looking southeast, near the site of the old Scadding Bridge and Cabin
2020 - Scadding Estate heritage plaque located at Riverside Park East
2020 – Scadding Estate heritage plaque located at Riverside Park East
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