Past & Present – Part 52

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March 12, 1950/ February 3, 2024  - Looking east towards Le Coq d'Or Tavern and Olympia Bowling and Billiards at 333 Yonge St, shown in the archive photo, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.
 
In the late 1940s, before the tavern became one of the most renowned rock'n'roll venues in the heart of the Yonge Street strip, Le Coq d'Or was a fine dining restaurant and cocktail lounge. The venue closed in 1976.
 
In more recent times, the building was home to HMV, and today, it’s a Tokyo Smoke storefront
March 12, 1950/ February 3, 2024 – Looking east towards Le Coq d’Or Tavern and Olympia Bowling and Billiards at 333 Yonge St, shown in the archive photo, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

In the late 1940s, before the tavern became one of the most renowned rock’n’roll venues in the heart of the Yonge Street strip, Le Coq d’Or was a fine dining restaurant and cocktail lounge. The venue closed in 1976.

In more recent times, the building was home to HMV, and today, it’s a Tokyo Smoke storefront (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 574, File 18, Item 49376 – Brigdens Limited photography)

January 7, 1935/February  3, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Birch St in the Summerhill neighbourhood of Toronto. The building at 1196-1204 Yonge St was built in 1889 and received heritage status from the city in 2022
January 7, 1935/February 3, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Birch St in the Summerhill neighbourhood of Toronto. The building at 1196-1204 Yonge St was built in 1889 and received heritage status from the city in 2022 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 207, Series 1251, Item 119 – N. MacNicol photographer)

Circa 1950/January 21, 2024 - The Donnybrook Ruin at the Riverdale Farm in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. The building that once stood tall as a two-storey structure has now been reduced to just the tower and the exterior walls of the main floor. Looking at the archive photo, you can see a glimpse of the time when the park housed the Riverdale Zoo
Circa 1950/January 21, 2024 – The Donnybrook Ruin at the Riverdale Farm in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. The building that once stood tall as a two-storey structure has now been reduced to just the tower and the exterior walls of the main floor. Looking at the archive photo, you can see a glimpse of the time when the park housed the Riverdale Zoo (City of Toronto Archives, Strathy Smith fonds, Fonds 1128, Series 380, Item 149)

November 3, 1923/July 11, 2021 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Dundas St E and Victoria St, in the Garden District of Toronto.

The archive photo shows when the century-old, three-storey building was home to the Powell Chemical Company, a pharmaceutical drug manufacturer. The building got its uniquely angled façade in the early 1920s when the city took a portion of it to accommodate the new diagonal piece of roadway for the crosstown streetcar line.

In later years, it housed various businesses, including Teela Digest Publications and Hakim Optical and recently stood vacant. The city-owned property was sold to Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University) in 2023; however, the building was deemed unsafe and was in the process of being demolished in May 2024
November 3, 1923/July 11, 2021 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Dundas St E and Victoria St, in the Garden District of Toronto.

The archive photo shows when the century-old, three-storey building was home to the Powell Chemical Company, a pharmaceutical drug manufacturer. The building got its uniquely angled façade in the early 1920s when the city took a portion of it to accommodate the new diagonal piece of roadway for the crosstown streetcar line.

In later years, it housed various businesses, including Teela Digest Publications and Hakim Optical and recently stood vacant. The city-owned property was sold to Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University) in 2023; however, the building was deemed unsafe and was in the process of being demolished in May 2024 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 372, Sub Series 3, Item 500 – Dept. of Public Works photographs)

November 10, 1981/July 11, 2021 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Dundas St E and Victoria St in Toronto's Garden District.

The archive photo shows when the century-old building was home to Teela Digest Publications. Its unique angled façade came about when the city acquired a portion of what was known then as the Powell Building (a pharmaceutical drug manufacturer) to create a new diagonal roadway for the crosstown streetcar line. In more recent years, the building served as a Hakim Optical storefront before becoming vacant.

Deemed unsafe, the building was sold to Toronto Metropolitan University in 2023, and as of May 2024, the demolition process had begun
November 10, 1981/July 11, 2021 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Dundas St E and Victoria St in Toronto’s Garden District.

The archive photo shows when the century-old building was home to Teela Digest Publications. Its unique angled façade came about when the city acquired a portion of what was known then as the Powell Building (a pharmaceutical drug manufacturer) to create a new diagonal roadway for the crosstown streetcar line. In more recent years, the building served as a Hakim Optical storefront before becoming vacant.

Deemed unsafe, the building was sold to Toronto Metropolitan University in 2023, and as of May 2024, the demolition process had begun (City of Toronto Archives, Harvey R. Naylor fonds, Fonds 1526, File 9, Item 13)

1922/April 23, 2023 – Looking southwest along Queen St W towards King St W in Toronto’s Parkdale neighbourhood. 

The archive photo captures a row of stores, including Spencer Wilfred men's furnishings, Little Grey Shoe Shop, Seniors Style ladies wear, Albany Florist, Boulevard Grill, Boulevard Apartments, and Bake-Rite in a building that also housed the Ocean House hotel. Originally constructed around 1885 as Scholes Hotel, the building's architecture once featured a tower. Notice the street cleaning worker with his cart, providing a glimpse into the daily life of that era. 

The building received heritage designation from the city in 1989 and today, it serves as a mixed-use property
1922/April 23, 2023 – Looking southwest along Queen St W towards King St W in Toronto’s Parkdale neighbourhood.

The archive photo captures a row of stores, including Spencer Wilfred men’s furnishings, Little Grey Shoe Shop, Seniors Style ladies wear, Albany Florist, Boulevard Grill, Boulevard Apartments, and Bake-Rite in a building that also housed the Ocean House hotel. Originally constructed around 1885 as Scholes Hotel, the building’s architecture once featured a tower. Notice the street cleaning worker with his cart, providing a glimpse into the daily life of that era.

The building received heritage designation from the city in 1989 and today, it serves as a mixed-use property (City of Toronto Archives, William James Family fonds, Fonds 1244, Item 1564)

Circa 1912/April 23, 2023 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Yonge St and King St, in the Financial District of Toronto
Circa 1912/April 23, 2023 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Yonge St and King St, in the Financial District of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, William James Family fonds, Fonds 1244, Item 492)

April 27, 1971/January 21, 2024 – Looking northeast on Church St between Isabella St and Charles St E in the Church-Wellesley neighbourhood of Toronto. 

The row housing located at 589 to 593 Church St, constructed in 1876, and the house at 595 Church St, dating back to around 1878, have been designated as heritage properties by the city in 1974
April 27, 1971/January 21, 2024 – Looking northeast on Church St between Isabella St and Charles St E in the Church-Wellesley neighbourhood of Toronto. The row housing located at 589 to 593 Church St, constructed in 1876, and the house at 595 Church St, dating back to around 1878, have been designated as heritage properties by the city in 1974 (City of Toronto Archives, Harvey R. Naylor fonds, Fonds 1526, File 8, Item 54)

1899/April 23, 2023 – Looking north towards the Old City Hall at 60 Queen St W in downtown Toronto. 

The construction of this Richardson Romanesque-style building designed by architect Edward James Lennox began in 1889 but wasn’t completed until a decade later due to many delays. It is interesting to note that the clock had not yet been installed in 1889. 

The building became a dedicated courthouse in 1965 after the new Toronto City Hall opened. In 1973, the city granted the building heritage status
1899/April 23, 2023 – Looking north towards the Old City Hall at 60 Queen St W in downtown Toronto.

The construction of this Richardson Romanesque-style building designed by architect Edward James Lennox began in 1889 but wasn’t completed until a decade later due to many delays. It is interesting to note that the clock had not yet been installed in 1889.

The building became a dedicated courthouse in 1965 after the new Toronto City Hall opened. In 1973, the city granted the building heritage status (Toronto Public Library Pictures-R-822 – Baldwin Collection of Canadiana)

1972/June 8, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Parliament St and Gerrard St E in the Cabbagetown and Regent Park neighbourhoods of Toronto. The present-day photo shows the construction of the Daniels On Parliament Condos
1972/June 8, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Parliament St and Gerrard St E in the Cabbagetown and Regent Park neighbourhoods of Toronto. The present-day photo shows the construction of the Daniels On Parliament Condos (City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Planning Board fonds, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 32, Item 4)

1972/January 21, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Church St and Granby St, in the Garden District of Toronto.

The archive photo shows when the building was home to Les Cavaliers Steak House. It was later the popular gay nightclub, the Barn and the Stables and more recently, it housed The Marquis of Granby before its closure. Originally constructed in 1891 as Stephen Murphy Houses and Store, the building's Second-Empire style and cultural value earned it heritage status from the city in 2006.
 
Future plans involve integrating the heritage properties at 414-418 Church St into a new 32-story tower at the site
1972/January 21, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Church St and Granby St, in the Garden District of Toronto.

The archive photo shows when the building was home to Les Cavaliers Steak House. It was later the popular gay nightclub, the Barn and the Stables and more recently, it housed The Marquis of Granby before its closure. Originally constructed in 1891 as Stephen Murphy Houses and Store, the building’s Second-Empire style and cultural value earned it heritage status from the city in 2006.

Future plans involve integrating the heritage properties at 414-418 Church St into a new 32-story tower at the site (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 51, Item 29)

1954/January 21, 2024 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Parliament St in the Cabbagetown South and Regent Park neighbourhoods of Toronto. The streetscape, including the TTC stop, has not changed much over the past 70 years
1954/January 21, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Parliament St in the Cabbagetown South and Regent Park neighbourhoods of Toronto. The streetscape, including the TTC stop, has not changed much over the past 70 years (Toronto Public Library Pictures-R-1221 – James Victor Salmon photographer)

1972/January 21, 2024 – Looking southwest toward the corner of Parliament St and Winchester St, in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. The streetscape has not changed much over the past 50 years. A few of the shops in the archive photo include the Liquor Control Board, Jordan Wines and Becker’s. Notice the LCBO is in the same location today
1972/January 21, 2024 – Looking southwest toward the corner of Parliament St and Winchester St, in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto.

The streetscape has not changed much over the past 50 years. A few of the shops in the archive photo include the Liquor Control Board, Jordan Wines and Becker’s. Notice the LCBO is in the same location today (City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Planning Board fonds, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 31, Item 18)

Circa 1914/January 21, 2024 – Looking northwest from Gerrard St E towards Parliament St in the Cabbagetown and Regent Park neighbourhoods of Toronto
Circa 1914/January 21, 2024 – Looking northwest from Gerrard St E towards Parliament St in the Cabbagetown and Regent Park neighbourhoods of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, E.L. Ruddy Company fonds, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 935)

May 3, 1975/January 21, 2024 – Looking towards 504 Church St, in the Church-Wellesley neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows when Gatsby's Restaurant occupied  the building
May 3, 1975/January 21, 2024 – Looking towards 504 Church St, in the Church-Wellesley neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows when Gatsby’s Restaurant occupied the building (City of Toronto Archives, Harvey R. Naylor fonds, Fonds 1526, File 8, Item 37)

September 1957/June 30, 2024 – Looking north on Dundas St W from Glenlake Ave in the Junction Triangle and West Bend neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The archive photo captures the IGA Super Market on the left side. The stairs leading to the Wallace Avenue Footbridge are on the right side of the photo. It is interesting to note that the footbridge had a second staircase on its north side during that period. Constructed in 1907, the bridge provided essential pedestrian access between Dundas St W and Wallace Ave in an area with a bustling railway corridor
September 1957/June 30, 2024 – Looking north on Dundas St W from Glenlake Ave in the Junction Triangle and West Bend neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The archive photo captures the IGA Super Market on the left side. The stairs leading to the Wallace Avenue Footbridge are on the right side of the photo. It is interesting to note that the footbridge had a second staircase on its north side during that period. Constructed in 1907, the bridge provided essential pedestrian access between Dundas St W and Wallace Ave in an area with a bustling railway corridor (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 372, Sub Series 100, Item 296 – Dept. of Public Works photographs)

1969/June 23, 2024 - The former McLaughlin Planetarium is located at 90 Queens Park on the south side of the Royal Ontario Museum in the University of Toronto – St George Campus area.
 
The McLaughlin Planetarium, which was established in 1968 and funded by Colonel R Samuel McLaughlin with $2 million, closed its doors in 1995. In 2009, the University of Toronto took ownership of the building, and it currently serves as a space for housing various artifacts under the Royal Ontario Museum's care
1969/June 23, 2024 – The former McLaughlin Planetarium is located at 90 Queens Park on the south side of the Royal Ontario Museum in the University of Toronto – St George Campus area.

The McLaughlin Planetarium, which was established in 1968 and funded by Colonel R Samuel McLaughlin with $2 million, closed its doors in 1995. In 2009, the University of Toronto took ownership of the building, and it currently serves as a space for housing various artifacts under the Royal Ontario Museum’s care (City of Toronto Archives, Roger Jowett fonds, Fonds 68, File 21)

Circa 1930 /June 23, 2024 – Looking northwest from Queen's Park and Charles St W towards Bloor St W in the University of Toronto – St George Campus and Yorkville neighbourhoods. Notice in both photos the Royal Ontario Museum in the left foreground and the Park Plaza, today the Park Hyatt in the distance
Circa 1930 /June 23, 2024 – Looking northwest from Queen’s Park and Charles St W towards Bloor St W in the University of Toronto – St George Campus and Yorkville neighbourhoods. Notice in both photos the Royal Ontario Museum in the left foreground and the Park Plaza, today the Park Hyatt in the distance (City of Toronto Archives, William James Family fonds, Fonds 1244, Item 3058)

October 28, 1935/June 23, 2024 –  The Ideal Aluminum Products Limited ghost sign is located at 2466 Dundas St W at Glenlake Ave, north of Bloor St W in the West Bend neighbourhood of Toronto.

The ghost sign is on the north side of the building and can be seen very well from the street level; however, there’s a good view of it from the deck of the Wallace Avenue Footbridge, which looks south. According to the ghost sign, this factory made aluminum cooking utensils.

Today, the building is the Dundas West Arts Building. The factory was converted into living spaces
October 28, 1935/June 23, 2024 – The Ideal Aluminum Products Limited ghost sign is located at 2466 Dundas St W at Glenlake Ave, north of Bloor St W in the West Bend neighbourhood of Toronto.

The ghost sign is on the north side of the building and can be seen very well from the street level; however, there’s a good view of it from the deck of the Wallace Avenue Footbridge, which looks south. According to the ghost sign, this factory made aluminum cooking utensils.

Today, the building is the Dundas West Arts Building. The factory was converted into living spaces (City of Toronto Archives Fonds 200, Series 372, Sub Series 3, Item 1379 – Dept. of Public Works photographs)

November 20, 1955/June 23, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of St Clair Ave W and Old Weston Rd, in the Stockyards District of Toronto. 

Constructed in the early 1890s for Alexander J Heydon, the Heydon House was originally established to accommodate the single men working at the nearby factories and railways. Architect James A Ellis was behind the design of the building, which features a turret once topped with a striking bell-shaped roof.

Today, a neighbourhood landmark and mixed-use building, the city granted Heydon House heritage status in 1983
November 20, 1955/June 23, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of St Clair Ave W and Old Weston Rd, in the Stockyards District of Toronto.

Constructed in the early 1890s for Alexander J Heydon, the Heydon House was originally established to accommodate the single men working at the nearby factories and railways. Architect James A Ellis was behind the design of the building, which features a turret once topped with a striking bell-shaped roof.

Today, a neighbourhood landmark and mixed-use building, the city granted Heydon House heritage status in 1983 (Toronto Public Library Pictures-R-3511 – James Victor Salmon photographer)

Circa 1930/March 16, 2024 - Looking northwest towards the Royal York Hotel along Front St W from east of Bay St in downtown Toronto. 

The archive photo showcases several distinct features, such as the streetcar tracks that used to run along Front St. The construction of the west and central sections of the Royal York Hotel was completed in 1929, a detail depicted in the historical photo. However, the 400-room east wing, prominently visible in the right foreground of the current image, was not added until the late 1950s
Circa 1930/March 16, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the Royal York Hotel along Front St W from east of Bay St in downtown Toronto.

The archive photo showcases several distinct features, such as the streetcar tracks that used to run along Front St. The construction of the west and central sections of the Royal York Hotel was completed in 1929, a detail depicted in the historical photo. However, the 400-room east wing, prominently visible in the right foreground of the current image, was not added until the late 1950s (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 372, Sub Series 100, Item 109 – Dept. of Public Works photographs)

1972/April 16, 2023 – Looking northeast from the intersection of King St E and Sherbourne St in Toronto's Old Town neighbourhood. 

Built in 1908, the two-storey Edwardian Classical style building was originally the Imperial Bank of Canada and designed by the Toronto-based architecture firm Darling & Pearson. In 1961, the bank merged with the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, and until 2000, the building served as a CIBC branch. 

Today, the building's historic facade has been preserved and repurposed as the entrance to the Kings Court Condo
1972/April 16, 2023 – Looking northeast from the intersection of King St E and Sherbourne St in Toronto’s Old Town neighbourhood.

Built in 1908, the two-storey Edwardian Classical style building was originally the Imperial Bank of Canada and designed by the Toronto-based architecture firm Darling & Pearson. In 1961, the bank merged with the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, and until 2000, the building served as a CIBC branch.

Today, the building’s historic facade has been preserved and repurposed as the entrance to the Kings Court Condo (City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Planning Board fonds, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 8, Item 5)

June 23, 1957/June 23, 2024 - Looking towards Fairbank United Church at 2750 Dufferin St, in the Glen Long neighbourhood of Toronto. 

The Fairbanks United Church has its origins dating back to its establishment as the Fairbank Methodist Church. The cornerstone of this structure was laid on June 27, 1889, and its inaugural service was held in October of the same year. Recognized for its historical significance, the city designated it as a heritage site in 2006. It also serves as the home for the Rising Sun Korean Congregation
June 23, 1957/June 23, 2024 – Looking towards Fairbank United Church at 2750 Dufferin St, in the Glen Long neighbourhood of Toronto.

The Fairbanks United Church has its origins dating back to its establishment as the Fairbank Methodist Church. The cornerstone of this structure was laid on June 27, 1889, and its inaugural service was held in October of the same year. Recognized for its historical significance, the city designated it as a heritage site in 2006. It also serves as the home for the Rising Sun Korean Congregation (Toronto Public Library Pictures-R-6410 – James Victor Salmon photographer)

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