Past & Present – Part 51

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1912/June 8, 2024 - Looking northeast on Queen St W, between Soho St and Spadina Ave, in Toronto's Entertainment District.

Lou and Nat Turofsky are pictured in the archive photo, sitting in Lou's first car. In the background, with the flat canopy, is the People's Theatre. It was renamed the Rivoli Theatre in 1925; today, the Rivoli serves as a popular restaurant and nightclub venue at 334 Queen St W.

The Turofsky brothers, who operated Alexandra Studios, were renowned for their photography, covering a wide range of subjects from royal dignitaries and celebrities to beauty pageants and sporting events. They also held the prestigious title of being the official photographers of the Toronto Maple Leafs, and their extensive Turofsky Collection is housed at the Hockey Hall of Fame
1912/June 8, 2024 – Looking northeast on Queen St W, between Soho St and Spadina Ave, in Toronto’s Entertainment District.

Lou and Nat Turofsky are pictured in the archive photo, sitting in Lou’s first car. In the background, with the flat canopy, is the People’s Theatre. It was renamed the Rivoli Theatre in 1925; today, the Rivoli serves as a popular restaurant and nightclub venue at 334 Queen St W.

The Turofsky brothers, who operated Alexandra Studios, were renowned for their photography, covering a wide range of subjects from royal dignitaries and celebrities to beauty pageants and sporting events. They also held the prestigious title of being the official photographers of the Toronto Maple Leafs, and their extensive Turofsky Collection is housed at the Hockey Hall of Fame (City of Toronto Archives, Alexandra Studio fonds, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 9439)

Between 1929-35/June 8, 2024 - Looking southeast from Richmond St W, east of University Ave in the Financial District of Toronto.

The photo from the archives captures the scene in front of Toronto Brake Service, once located at 137 Richmond St W. In the background, the majestic Art-Deco-style Concourse Building stands tall, adorned with two eagles and a sunburst on its west side.

In the present-day photo, the glass and steel EY Tower (Ernst & Young) can be seen in the distance. The design of the EY Tower incorporates a reproduction of the Concourse Building's south and east facades, blending decorative with contemporary architecture. It's worth noting that the current photo was taken in front of the Toronto Hilton
Between 1929-35/June 8, 2024 – Looking southeast from Richmond St W, east of University Ave in the Financial District of Toronto.

The photo from the archives captures the scene in front of Toronto Brake Service, once located at 137 Richmond St W. In the background, the majestic Art-Deco-style Concourse Building stands tall, adorned with two eagles and a sunburst on its west side.

In the present-day photo, the glass and steel EY Tower (Ernst & Young) can be seen in the distance. The design of the EY Tower incorporates a reproduction of the Concourse Building’s south and east facades, blending decorative with contemporary architecture. It’s worth noting that the current photo was taken in front of the Toronto Hilton (City of Toronto Archives, Alexandra Studio fonds, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 552)

July 1, 1929/March 16, 2024 - Looking west towards the Royal York Hotel along Front St W from east of Bay St in downtown Toronto. 

The archive photograph shows a horse parade on Dominion Day, featuring horses tasked with delivering goods such as dairy, baked goods, ice, and beer. The procession served as a reminder of the role horses played when the popularity of gas-powered vehicles was rapidly increasing. 

Notably, while the construction of the west and central sections of the Royal York was completed in 1929, the 400-room east wing captured in the right foreground of the current photo was not added until the late 1950s.

The tower in the left background of the archive photo was the city's second Union Station, which was in use from 1873 until 1927 when the present-day Union Station opened
July 1, 1929/March 16, 2024 – Looking west towards the Royal York Hotel along Front St W from east of Bay St in downtown Toronto.

The archive photograph shows a horse parade on Dominion Day, featuring horses tasked with delivering goods such as dairy, baked goods, ice, and beer. The procession served as a reminder of the role horses played when the popularity of gas-powered vehicles was rapidly increasing.

Notably, while the construction of the west and central sections of the Royal York was completed in 1929, the 400-room east wing captured in the right foreground of the current photo was not added until the late 1950s.

The tower in the left background of the archive photo was the city’s second Union Station, which was in use from 1873 until 1927 when the present-day Union Station opened (City of Toronto Archives, Globe and Mail fonds, Fonds 1266, Item 17129)

1972/March 29, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Queen St E and Church St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

The corner building at 79 Queen St E was designed by architects WC Vaux Chadwick & Bryan Chadwick in the late 1920s as a branch for the Bank of Nova Scotia. The bank closed this location in 2018. With its architectural significance, the city recognized the building's importance by granting it heritage status back in 1976.

Notice the Eaton’s truck on the left side of the archive photo
1972/March 29, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Queen St E and Church St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

The corner building at 79 Queen St E was designed by architects WC Vaux Chadwick & Bryan Chadwick in the late 1920s as a branch for the Bank of Nova Scotia. The bank closed this location in 2018. With its architectural significance, the city recognized the building’s importance by granting it heritage status back in 1976.

Notice the Eaton’s truck on the left side of the archive photo (City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Planning Board fonds, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 51, Item 9)

1972/May 4, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Church St, in the Garden District of Toronto. The streetscape is relatively unchanged over the past 50 years
1972/May 4, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Church St, in the Garden District of Toronto. The streetscape is relatively unchanged over the past 50 years (City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Planning Board fonds, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 51, Item 8)

1927/March 10, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Wellington St W in downtown Toronto.

The taller building in the archive photo was initially known as Hotel Mossop. Built in 1907/08, the eight-storey hotel was designed by architect James P Hynes and consisted of 48 guestrooms. Notably, the hotel was lauded for its "fireproof" construction.
 
In 1927, it underwent a name change and became known as the Hotel Victoria, a title it still holds today
1927/March 10, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Wellington St W in downtown Toronto.

The taller building in the archive photo was initially known as Hotel Mossop. Built in 1907/08, the eight-storey hotel was designed by architect James P Hynes and consisted of 48 guestrooms. Notably, the hotel was lauded for its “fireproof” construction.

In 1927, it underwent a name change and became known as the Hotel Victoria, a title it still holds today (City of Toronto Archives, William James Family fonds, Fonds 1244, Item 7050)

Between 1988-90/May 25, 2024 – Looking southeast along Yonge St from just south of Dundas St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. In the archive photo, notice Lick’s Ice Cream & Burger shop, which opened at this location in 1988. The block was torn down to make way for Yonge-Dundas Square, today known as Sankofa Square
Between 1988-90/May 25, 2024 – Looking southeast along Yonge St from just south of Dundas St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

In the archive photo, notice Lick’s Ice Cream & Burger shop, which opened at this location in 1988. The block was torn down to make way for Yonge-Dundas Square, today known as Sankofa Square (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 597, Item 39, Urban Design photographs)

Between 1978-80/May 25, 2024 – Looking southeast along Yonge St from just south of Dundas St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. In the archival photograph, you can see the Classic Bookshop, Hard Rock Café, and Nickelodeon. Nowadays, these spots have been transformed into Sankofa Square (formerly known as Yonge-Dundas Square), with the corner building being occupied by Shoppers Drug Mart
Between 1978-80/May 25, 2024 – Looking southeast along Yonge St from just south of Dundas St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

In the archival photograph, you can see the Classic Bookshop, Hard Rock Café, and Nickelodeon. Nowadays, these spots have been transformed into Sankofa Square (formerly known as Yonge -Dundas Square), with the corner building being occupied by Shoppers Drug Mart (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 308, Item 2, Urban Design photographs)

1980s/January 27, 2024 - Looking northeast towards Gould St from Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. 

The photo from the past shows a scene of people playing chess next to Sam the Record Man. Today, the same location is home to the Sheldon & Tracy Levy Student Learning Centre, which has replaced the former site of Sam the Record Man, A & A’s, and other storefronts
1980s/January 27, 2024 – Looking northeast towards Gould St from Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The photo from the past shows a scene of people playing chess next to Sam the Record Man. Today, the same location is home to the Sheldon & Tracy Levy Student Learning Centre, which has replaced the former site of Sam the Record Man, A & A’s, and other storefronts (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 1465, File 19, Item 60, Urban Design photographs)

July 13, 1983/January 1, 2024 – Looking northeast along Dundas St W, east of Ossington Ave, in the Trinity-Bellwoods neighbourhood.

Notice the Lakeview Restaurant. It has been serving traditional breakfasts and more to its guests since 1932. This dining establishment has been featured in popular TV shows such as Diners, Drive-ins and Dives, as well as making appearances in Hollywood movies like Hairspray and Cocktail
July 13, 1983/January 1, 2024 – Looking northeast along Dundas St W, east of Ossington Ave, in the Trinity-Bellwoods neighbourhood.

Notice the Lakeview Restaurant. It has been serving traditional breakfasts and more to its guests since 1932. This dining establishment has been featured in popular TV shows such as Diners, Drive-ins and Dives, as well as making appearances in Hollywood movies like Hairspray and Cocktail (City of Toronto Archives, Harvey R. Naylor fonds, Fonds 1526, File 71, Item 136)

1980/January 1, 2024 - The Matador Club was once located at 466 Dovercourt Rd just north of College St in the Dufferin Grove neighbourhood of Toronto. 

Originally constructed in 1914/15, this building had a diverse history. It began as the location of the Davis Dance Academy on the main floor, while the second floor served as a residential apartment. Over time, the building was repurposed into a bowling alley and accommodated various commercial tenants. 

In 1964, Ann Dunn acquired the property, undertook renovations, and introduced The Matador, a vibrant live country music club. The venue became a prominent fixture in the local music scene, hosting performances by iconic artists such as Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, Gordon Lightfoot, and k.d. lang. The Matador ceased operations in 2007. Presently, there are plans for a mixed-use development at this location
1980/January 1, 2024 – The Matador Club was once located at 466 Dovercourt Rd just north of College St in the Dufferin Grove neighbourhood of Toronto.

Originally constructed in 1914/15, this building had a diverse history. It began as the location of the Davis Dance Academy on the main floor, while the second floor served as a residential apartment. Over time, the building was repurposed into a bowling alley and accommodated various commercial tenants.

In 1964, Ann Dunn acquired the property, undertook renovations, and introduced The Matador, a vibrant live country music club. The venue became a prominent fixture in the local music scene, hosting performances by iconic artists such as Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, Gordon Lightfoot, and k.d. lang. The Matador ceased operations in 2007. Presently, there are plans for a mixed-use development at this location (Toronto Public Library Lochist-BL-074)

1980s/March 29, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Church St from Metropolitan United Church grounds in the Garden District of Toronto
1980s/March 29, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Church St from Metropolitan United Church grounds in the Garden District of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 1465, File 469, Item 16 – Urban Design photographs)

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