Past & Present – Part 50

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Between 1980-83/May 25, 2024 – Looking southeast along Yonge St from just south of Dundas St W in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. In the archive photo, vendors are selling flowers and popcorn in front of the Toronto Eaton Centre. In the background, notice the red and white Nickelodeon sign
Between 1980-83/May 25, 2024 – Looking southeast along Yonge St from just south of Dundas St W in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. In the archive photo, vendors are selling flowers and popcorn in front of the Toronto Eaton Centre. In the background, notice the red and white Nickelodeon sign (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 597, Item 39, Urban Design photographs)

1972/January 1, 2024 – Looking southeast along Bay St from Edward St, towards Dundas St W, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The archive photo shows Coleman's Delicatessen Grill, Smoke Shop, Hymie’s Imperial Cleaners and Hotel Ford. Today, the block is home to the Atrium on Bay office building
1972/January 1, 2024 – Looking southeast along Bay St from Edward St, towards Dundas St W, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The archive photo shows Coleman’s Delicatessen Grill, Smoke Shop, Hymie’s Imperial Cleaners and Hotel Ford. Today, the block is home to the Atrium on Bay office building (City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Planning Board fonds, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 59, Item 24)

1980s/January 27, 2024 - Looking west towards Yonge St from Gould St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. 

The historical photo captures the old sidewalk chess tables adjacent  to the former Sam the Record Man and CIBC, with Funland and Fran's Restaurant (Upper Deck) visible in the background
1980s/January 27, 2024 – Looking west towards Yonge St from Gould St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The historical photo captures the old sidewalk chess tables adjacent to the former Sam the Record Man and CIBC, with Funland and Fran’s Restaurant (Upper Deck) visible in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 1465, File 19, Item 66, Urban Design photographs)

Circa 1915/January 27, 2024 - Looking northeast along Queen St W from Gladstone Ave in the Queen Street West Art and Design District of Toronto.
In the photographs, the Gladstone House Hotel is prominently displayed in the left forefront. However, the archive reveals that the hotel once featured an ornate marquee above its main entrance. Constructed between 1889 and 1890, the Gladstone House was considered a railroad hotel due to its proximity to two train depots at the time.
The hotel has had various owners and has undergone revitalization and reinvention over the past century. The guestrooms at the charming 55-room Gladstone House were fully renovated in 2020, and it proudly holds the title of Toronto's oldest operating hotel
Circa 1915/January 27, 2024 – Looking northeast along Queen St W from Gladstone Ave in the Queen Street West Art and Design District of Toronto.

In the photographs, the Gladstone House Hotel is prominently displayed in the left forefront. However, the archive reveals that the hotel once featured an ornate marquee above its main entrance. Constructed between 1889 and 1890, the Gladstone House was considered a railroad hotel due to its proximity to two train depots at the time.

The hotel has had various owners and has undergone revitalization and reinvention over the past century. The guestrooms at the charming 55-room Gladstone House were fully renovated in 2020, and it proudly holds the title of Toronto’s oldest operating hotel (Toronto Public Library PC_4479)

May 4, 2024 – The northeast corner of Queen St E and Church St, in Toronto's Garden District.

The photographs show the front and back of the facades at the corner. The vibrant yellow facade at 60 Queen St E once housed Thrifty's Sport Shop and later accommodated various businesses such as Public Optical, Gino's Pizza, and Shawarma's King.

Plans are underway to integrate the building's historic facade and those of neighbouring structures into a new 57-storey tower known as 60 Queen St East Condos
May 4, 2024 – The northeast corner of Queen St E and Church St, in Toronto’s Garden District.

The photographs show the front and back of the facades at the corner. The vibrant yellow facade at 60 Queen St E once housed Thrifty’s Sport Shop and later accommodated various businesses such as Public Optical, Gino’s Pizza, and Shawarma’s King.

Plans are underway to integrate the building’s historic facade and those of neighbouring structures into a new 57-storey tower known as 60 Queen St East Condos

June 11, 2022/January 27, 2024 – Looking south towards 1255 Queen St W, west of Dufferin St, in the Parkdale neighbourhood of Toronto.

The building housed Stones Place, a Rolling Stones-themed dance bar operated by Jerry Stone, a dedicated collector of Rolling Stones memorabilia. Following 20 years of operation, the venue closed its doors in 2020. In the same year, the building, originally constructed around 1880, was granted heritage status due to its historical significance.

Today, the space is home to Tilt Arcade Bar, which boasts the title of Toronto's largest retro arcade (Denise Marie, photographer)
June 11, 2022/January 27, 2024 – Looking south towards 1255 Queen St W, west of Dufferin St, in the Parkdale neighbourhood of Toronto.

The building housed Stones Place, a Rolling Stones-themed dance bar operated by Jerry Stone, a dedicated collector of Rolling Stones memorabilia. Following 20 years of operation, the venue closed its doors in 2020. In the same year, the building, originally constructed around 1880, was granted heritage status due to its historical significance.

Today, the space is home to Tilt Arcade Bar, which boasts the title of Toronto’s largest retro arcade (Denise Marie, photographer)

Between 1920-26/January 27, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St W and Sorauen Ave, in the Parkdale neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo captures the time when J. Anderson Grocers was located in the building. An interesting detail to note is that the building originally featured a distinctive mansard roof, which has since been removed. In more recent years, the space was occupied by Pete's Corner Grill, and today, it is the location of Dave’s Hot Chicken at 1582 Queen St W
Between 1920-26/January 27, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St W and Sorauen Ave, in the Parkdale neighbourhood of Toronto.

The archive photo captures the time when J. Anderson Grocers was located in the building. An interesting detail to note is that the building originally featured a distinctive mansard roof, which has since been removed.

In more recent years, the space was occupied by Pete’s Corner Grill, and today, it is the location of Dave’s Hot Chicken at 1582 Queen St W (City of Toronto Archives, E.L. Ruddy Company fonds, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 2543)

1972/February 10, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the former Canadian National Railway Office Building (CNR Building) at the corner of Cherry St and Front St E, in the Canary District of Toronto’s West Don Lands neighbourhood.

In 1905, the Canadian Northern Railway, which later became part of the Canadian National Railway, bought land east of Cherry St and south of Eastern Ave. Over the next decade, the railway company demolished over 200 houses on the land as part of its expansion plans. Around 1923, they constructed their own facilities, including the freight office building shown in the photos. The building was used until 1970 when the railways started to leave the area.

In the late 1980s, the government took over a large part of the railway land for redevelopment, including the former CNR freight office at 453 Cherry St. The building was given heritage status in 2005. It and the historic former Palace Street School building across the street serve as an entrance to the modern neighbourhood
1972/February 10, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the former Canadian National Railway Office Building (CNR Building) at the corner of Cherry St and Front St E, in the Canary District of Toronto’s West Don Lands neighbourhood.

In 1905, the Canadian Northern Railway, which later became part of the Canadian National Railway, bought land east of Cherry St and south of Eastern Ave. Over the next decade, the railway company demolished over 200 houses on the land as part of its expansion plans. Around 1923, they constructed their own facilities, including the freight office building shown in the photos. The building was used until 1970 when the railways started to leave the area.

In the late 1980s, the government took over a large part of the railway land for redevelopment, including the former CNR freight office at 453 Cherry St. The building was given heritage status in 2005. It and the historic former Palace Street School building across the street serve as an entrance to the modern neighbourhood (City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Planning Board fonds, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 19, Item 28)

July 2009/January 27, 2024 – Looking southwest from Roncesvalles Ave towards The Queensway in the Parkdale and Sunnyside neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The building was constructed in 1939 and was originally called the Edgewater Hotel. Its iconic neon sign, featured in the Google Street View photo, remained a prominent fixture through the hotel's various name changes. The sign had to be removed in 2009 due to deterioration. Since 2020, the building has served as Hotel Shelter in partnership with the City of Toronto
July 2009/January 27, 2024 – Looking southwest from Roncesvalles Ave towards The Queensway in the Parkdale and Sunnyside neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The building was constructed in 1939 and was originally called the Edgewater Hotel. Its iconic neon sign, featured in the Google Street View photo, remained a prominent fixture through the hotel’s various name changes. The sign had to be removed in 2009 due to deterioration. Since 2020, the building has served as Hotel Shelter in partnership with the City of Toronto (Google Maps)

1972/February 10, 2024 – Looking west towards the intersection of Jarvis St and Gloucester St, in the Church-Wellesley, also known as "The Village" neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice the squirrel in the present-day photo doing the high-wire act
1972/February 10, 2024 – Looking west towards the intersection of Jarvis St and Gloucester St, in the Church-Wellesley, also known as “The Village” neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice the squirrel in the present-day photo doing the high-wire act (City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Planning Board fonds, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 3, Item 18)

July 1973/March 16, 2024 – Looking northeast on Yonge St, north of Queen St E, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo captures the atmosphere of the Yonge Street pedestrian mall alongside the Colonial Tavern. The tavern was situated between the historic Bank of Toronto building on the left and the current location of The Massey Tower, which the Canadian Bank of Commerce once occupied.

The Colonial Tavern opened in 1947 and became renowned for live jazz and blues performances. Over the years, the stage at The Colonial hosted some of the most iconic musicians of the time, including Miles Davis, Ella Fitzgerald, Muddy Waters, Benny Goodman, and numerous others. The Colonial closed in 1987, and the building was torn down later that year. This venue held a significant role in Toronto's vibrant music scene.

Today, a granite monument in the shape of a record serves as a reminder of the club's legacy. Embedded in the sidewalk where The Colonial once stood, this disc is inscribed with the names of over 125 music legends who performed on the club's stage
July 1973/March 16, 2024 – Looking northeast on Yonge St, north of Queen St E, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo captures the atmosphere of the Yonge Street pedestrian mall alongside the Colonial Tavern. The tavern was situated between the historic Bank of Toronto building on the left and the current location of The Massey Tower, which the Canadian Bank of Commerce once occupied.

The Colonial Tavern opened in 1947 and became renowned for live jazz and blues performances. Over the years, the stage at The Colonial hosted some of the most iconic musicians of the time, including Miles Davis, Ella Fitzgerald, Muddy Waters, Benny Goodman, and numerous others. The Colonial closed in 1987, and the building was torn down later that year. This venue held a significant role in Toronto’s vibrant music scene.

Today, a granite monument in the shape of a record serves as a reminder of the club’s legacy. Embedded in the sidewalk where The Colonial once stood, this disc is inscribed with the names of over 125 music legends who performed on the club’s stage (City of Toronto Archives, E.R. White fonds, Fonds 1118, Series 377, Item 782)

1972/February 10, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Jarvis St, in the Garden District of Toronto. In the right background of the archive photo, notice the painted sign on the building points to the Warwick Hotel, which was once across the street
1972/February 10, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Jarvis St, in the Garden District of Toronto. In the right background of the archive photo, notice the painted sign on the building points to the Warwick Hotel, which was once across the street (City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Planning Board fonds, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 9, Item 12)

September 17, 1984/February 10, 2024 - Looking west towards the corner of King St E and Berkeley St in Toronto's Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood.

The building was once home to the offices and halls for merchants John and George Reid of the Reid Lumber Company. Today, Italinteriors occupies the space at 359 King St E. Notice the white Chevrolet Camero in the archive photo
September 17, 1984/February 10, 2024 – Looking west towards the corner of King St E and Berkeley St in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood.

The building was once home to the offices and halls for merchants John and George Reid of the Reid Lumber Company. Today, Italinteriors occupies the space at 359 King St E. Notice the white Chevrolet Camero in the archive photo (City of Toronto Archives, Harvey R. Naylor fonds, Fonds 1526, File 65, Item 143)

September 2014/April 21, 2024 - Looking west on Yonge St, between Grenville St and Grosvenor St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. 

The Google Maps photo captures the three-storey building once home to Syd Silvers Clothing, along with the clock tower that was originally part of the Yonge Street Fire Hall No. 3, later St Charles Tavern. Today, they have been restored and incorporated into the Halo Residences - a 45-storey condo tower (Google Maps)
September 2014/April 21, 2024 – Looking west on Yonge St, between Grenville St and Grosvenor St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The Google Maps photo captures the three-storey building once home to Syd Silvers Clothing, along with the clock tower that was originally part of the Yonge Street Fire Hall No. 3, later St Charles Tavern. Today, they have been restored and incorporated into the Halo Residences – a 45-storey condo tower (Google Maps)

April 26, 1899/May 12, 2024 - Looking north up Spadina Ave from College St in the University District and Harbord Village neighbourhoods of Toronto. 

The archive photo shows a boy filling up a cup at a “man-horse-dog” freshwater fountain. The large trough facing the street was for horses. On the opposite side was the fountain for pedestrians, and the lower basin was for dogs.

Knox College at 1 Spadina Cres is visible in the background. The University of Toronto acquired the college property, originally constructed in the mid-1870s, and it is now known as the Daniels Building
April 26, 1899/May 12, 2024 – Looking north up Spadina Ave from College St in the University District and Harbord Village neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The archive photo shows a boy filling up a cup at a “man-horse-dog” freshwater fountain. The large trough facing the street was for horses. On the opposite side was the fountain for pedestrians, and the lower basin was for dogs.

Knox College at 1 Spadina Cres is visible in the background. The University of Toronto acquired the college property, originally constructed in the mid-1870s, and it is now known as the Daniels Building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 376, File 2, Item 49)

Between 1986-92/February 10, 2024 - Looking east towards the Zanzibar at 359 Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The building has an interesting history that dates back to 1895. Originally constructed as an undertaker's business and residence, the three-storey building has since been home to a variety of businesses, including a photo studio and cafe.

After a complete restoration in 1951, the Zanzibar Tavern opened in the building. Ten years later, David Cooper purchased the tavern and early on, the Zanzibar was more about live music. When the a-go-go craze hit the Yonge Street Strip, go-go dancers began accompanying the bands on the Zanzibar's stage. The club transitioned to burlesque entertainment and, in the 1980s, an adult entertainment club. The venue underwent a $300,000 Vegas-inspired update in 2001, which included covering the building in gold-glazed tiles. Today known as Club Zanzibar, it's one of the city's last surviving strip clubs
Between 1986-92/February 10, 2024 – Looking east towards the Zanzibar at 359 Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The building has an interesting history that dates back to 1895. Originally constructed as an undertaker’s business and residence, the three-storey building has since been home to a variety of businesses, including a photo studio and cafe.

After a complete restoration in 1951, the Zanzibar Tavern opened in the building. Ten years later, David Cooper purchased the tavern and early on, the Zanzibar was more about live music. When the a-go-go craze hit the Yonge Street Strip, go-go dancers began accompanying the bands on the Zanzibar’s stage. The club transitioned to burlesque entertainment and, in the 1980s, an adult entertainment club. The venue underwent a $300,000 Vegas-inspired update in 2001, which included covering the building in gold-glazed tiles. Today known as Club Zanzibar, it’s one of the city’s last surviving strip clubs (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 618, Item 41)

1950/February 10, 2024 – Looking towards 359 Yonge St, south of Gerrard St E, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.
 
The building was originally constructed in 1895 to serve as an undertaker's business and residence. It was used by a burial company until the early 1910s. Over time, the building was repurposed to house various businesses, including the Rosticceria Tavern, as seen in an archive photo. 

In 1951, the building was renovated and became the Zanzibar Tavern. It was initially a restaurant and live music venue, and over the years, it has transitioned to entertainment, which is today known as Club Zanzibar
1950/February 10, 2024 – Looking towards 359 Yonge St, south of Gerrard St E, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The building was originally constructed in 1895 to serve as an undertaker’s business and residence. It was used by a burial company until the early 1910s. Over time, the building was repurposed to house various businesses, including the Rosticceria Tavern, as seen in an archive photo.

In 1951, the building was renovated and became the Zanzibar Tavern. It was initially a restaurant and live music venue, and over the years, it has transitioned to entertainment, which is today known as Club Zanzibar (City of Toronto Archives, Series 574, File 19, Item 49383)

October 23, 1958/May 4, 2024 - Looking north up Ossington Ave from Queen St W in the Beaconsfield Village neighbourhood of Toronto.

The archive photo shows the Columbia Hotel in the left foreground with Fire Hall No. 9 hose and clock tower in the background. 

The hotel was demolished in 2009 and replaced with the present-day mixed-use building. Fire Hall No. 9 remained in service for over 90 years until its decommissioning in the late 1960s. Although the clock aspect of the tower has since been removed, the remaining structure received heritage status in 2003
October 23, 1958/May 4, 2024 – Looking north up Ossington Ave from Queen St W in the Beaconsfield Village neighbourhood of Toronto.

The archive photo shows the Columbia Hotel in the left foreground with Fire Hall No. 9 hose and clock tower in the background.

The hotel was demolished in 2009 and replaced with the present-day mixed-use building. Fire Hall No. 9 remained in service for over 90 years until its decommissioning in the late 1960s. Although the clock aspect of the tower has since been removed, the remaining structure received heritage status in 2003 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 100, Item 374)

1910/April 21, 2024 - Looking northeast along Queen St E from Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The row of buildings located at 216-232 Queen St E was constructed in 1889, while the Carlyle Block at 234-242 Queen St E dates back to 1883. The group of buildings received heritage designation
1910/April 21, 2024 – Looking northeast along Queen St E from Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The row of buildings located at 216-232 Queen St E was constructed in 1889, while the Carlyle Block at 234-242 Queen St E dates back to 1883. The group of buildings received heritage designation from the city in 1973 (Toronto Public Library, Baldwin Collection of Canadiana, PICTURES-R-1217)

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