Past & Present – Part 49

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August 12, 1929/March 26, 2023 – Looking west towards the Ontario Government Building, today home to Liberty Grand Entertainment Complex, located at 25 British Columbia Rd, on the west side of Exhibition Place in Toronto.

The magnificent Beaux-Arts-style structure served as a hub for Ontario government-related activities during the CNE from 1926 until the opening of Ontario Place, just 1 km away in 1971. Following this, in 1974, the Ontario Government Building was rebranded as the Carlsberg Building, under the operation of Canadian Breweries, with a focus on promoting the Carlsberg brand.

After undergoing a restoration, the waterfront landmark was unveiled as the Liberty Grand in 2001
August 12, 1929/March 26, 2023 – Looking west towards the Ontario Government Building, today home to Liberty Grand Entertainment Complex, located at 25 British Columbia Rd, on the west side of Exhibition Place in Toronto.

The magnificent Beaux-Arts-style structure served as a hub for Ontario government-related activities during the CNE from 1926 until the opening of Ontario Place, just 1 km away in 1971. Following this, in 1974, the Ontario Government Building was rebranded as the Carlsberg Building, under the operation of Canadian Breweries, with a focus on promoting the Carlsberg brand.

After undergoing a restoration, the waterfront landmark was unveiled as the Liberty Grand in 2001 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 7109, Alfred Pearson – photographer)

1899/May 7, 2022 – Looking towards 359 Yonge St, between Gould St and Gerrard St E, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The building has an interesting history dating back to the late 19th century and looks vastly different than it does today. It was constructed to serve as John Young & Alexander Millard Undertakers' business and residence, as shown in the architectural drawings by Burke & Horwood.

Over the years, the building has housed a variety of businesses and, in 1951, underwent a renovation to open as the Zanzibar Tavern - a restaurant and live music venue. The club transitioned to burlesque entertainment and, in the 1980s, an adult entertainment club. In 2001, the building underwent a $300,000 Vegas-inspired update, which included covering the building in gold-glazed tiles and is today known as Club Zanzibar
1899/May 7, 2022 – Looking towards 359 Yonge St, between Gould St and Gerrard St E, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The building has an interesting history dating back to the late 19th century and looks vastly different than it does today. It was constructed to serve as John Young & Alexander Millard Undertakers’ business and residence, as shown in the architectural drawings by Burke & Horwood.

Over the years, the building has housed a variety of businesses and, in 1951, underwent a renovation to open as the Zanzibar Tavern – a restaurant and live music venue. The club transitioned to burlesque entertainment and, in the 1980s, an adult entertainment club. In 2001, the building underwent a $300,000 Vegas-inspired update, which included covering the building in gold-glazed tiles and is today known as Club Zanzibar (Canadian Architect and Builder, Vol. 12, No. 6, June 1899, pg 115 – Canadiana)

May 1953/May 4, 2024 - Looking north up Yonge St from Bloor St, in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows The Royal Bank of Canada on the right and the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce on the left. The present-day photo shows the same banks, CIBC and RBC, at the same corners
May 1953/May 4, 2024 – Looking north up Yonge St from Bloor St, in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows The Royal Bank of Canada on the right and the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce on the left. The present-day photo shows the same banks, CIBC and RBC, at the same corners (Toronto Public Library Pictures-R-1966 – James Victor Salmon photographer)

March 1950/May 4, 2024 – Looking southwest along Ossington Ave, from north of Queen St W, in the Beaconsfield Village neighbourhood of Toronto.

Notice Fire Hall No. 9 tower in the centre-right. Built in 1878, the fire hall was decommissioned in the late 1960s. The archive image of the structure reveals that there was once a clock situated atop the hose-drying tower. The fire hall and tower still stand today; however, the clock is absent. The heritage-designated former fire hall is leased from the City of Toronto to Unity Health Toronto and provides support for community members.

The domed building in the distance of the archival image is what was known at the time as the Ontario Hospital, Toronto. The building was constructed in the mid-1800s and torn down in 1976. Today, it’s the site of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)
March 1950/May 4, 2024 – Looking southwest along Ossington Ave, from north of Queen St W, in the Beaconsfield Village neighbourhood of Toronto.

Notice Fire Hall No. 9 tower in the centre-right. Built in 1878, the fire hall was decommissioned in the late 1960s. The archive image of the structure reveals that there was once a clock situated atop the hose-drying tower. The fire hall and tower still stand today; however, the clock is absent. The heritage-designated former fire hall is leased from the City of Toronto to Unity Health Toronto and provides support for community members.

The domed building in the distance of the archival image is what was known at the time as the Ontario Hospital, Toronto. The building was constructed in the mid-1800s and torn down in 1976. Today, it’s the site of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) (Toronto Public Library Pictures-R-6169 – Maurice E Roberts artist)

January 2, 1955/May 4, 2024 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St W and Ossington Ave, in the Beaconsfield Village neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the building was once home to the Columbia Hotel. The building was demolished back in 2009 and replaced with the present-day mixed-use structure
January 2, 1955/May 4, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St W and Ossington Ave, in the Beaconsfield Village neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the building was once home to the Columbia Hotel. The building was demolished back in 2009 and replaced with the present-day mixed-use structure (Toronto Public Library Pictures-R-6084, James Victor Salmon photographer)

1972/April 21, 2024 - Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Sherbourne St in Toronto's Moss Park neighbourhood. 

The row of buildings at 216-232 Queen St E dates back to its construction in 1889, while the Carlyle Block, consisting of buildings at 234-242 Queen St E, was constructed in 1883, adding to the area's architectural significance. In recognition of their contribution to the neighbourhood's heritage, the city granted the group of buildings heritage status in 1973
1972/April 21, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Sherbourne St in Toronto’s Moss Park neighbourhood.

The row of buildings at 216-232 Queen St E dates back to its construction in 1889, while the Carlyle Block, consisting of buildings at 234-242 Queen St E, was constructed in 1883, adding to the area’s architectural significance. In recognition of their contribution to the neighbourhood’s heritage, the city granted the group of buildings heritage status in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Planning Board fonds, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 50, Item 22)

Between 1916-19/May 4, 2024 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Grenville St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.
 
The archive photo shows the Dominion School of Telegraphy and Railroading along with the automobile dealership, McMullen & Lee Limited, which once occupied the corner.
 
Also, in both photos, notice the St Charles Tavern Clock Tower, originally part of Yonge Street Fire Hall No. 3, in the background
Between 1916-19/May 4, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Grenville St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo shows the Dominion School of Telegraphy and Railroading along with the automobile dealership, McMullen & Lee Limited, which once occupied the corner.

Also, in both photos, notice the St Charles Tavern Clock Tower, originally part of Yonge Street Fire Hall No. 3, in the background (City of Toronto Archives, William James Family fonds, Fonds 1244, Item 1562)

July 3, 1923/May 4, 2024 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St E and Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo captures when commercial buildings dominated the block, while the present-day photo showcases the construction of the Ontario Line's Moss Park Station
July 3, 1923/May 4, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St E and Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo captures when commercial buildings dominated the block, while the present-day photo showcases the construction of the Ontario Line’s Moss Park Station (City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Transit Commission fonds, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 2344)

Between 1978-80/ May 4, 2024 – Looking southeast along Dundas Sq from Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The 3-storey building was constructed in 1918 for Child's Restaurants. It was later home to Friar's Tavern and then the Hard Rock Cafe from 1978 until 2017, as shown in the archive photo. Today, the heritage-designated building is home to a Shopper's Drug Mart, with Friar's Music Museum on the second floor
Between 1978-80/ May 4, 2024 – Looking southeast along Dundas Sq from Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The 3-storey building was constructed in 1918 for Child’s Restaurants. It was later home to Friar’s Tavern and then the Hard Rock Cafe from 1978 until 2017, as shown in the archive photo.

Today, the heritage-designated building is home to a Shopper’s Drug Mart, with Friar’s Music Museum on the second floor (City of Toronto Archives, Urban Design photographs, Fonds 200, Series 1465, File 308, Item 4)

April 21, 2024/1930s - Looking southwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Dundas Sq in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The building in the foreground was constructed in 1918 and has housed various establishments over the years. In its early days, it was home to Child's Restaurant and Karry's Billiards & Bowling, while the shops next to it included United Cigar Stores and Royal Restaurant. The building's corner location has made it a prime spot for businesses to set up shop and has seen its fair share of transformation. From Friar's Tavern and Nickelodeon to the Hard Rock Café, it has been a hub of entertainment.

Today, the building is occupied by Shopper's Drug Mart and Friar's Music Museum
April 21, 2024/1930s – Looking southwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Dundas Sq in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The building in the foreground was constructed in 1918 and has housed various establishments over the years. In its early days, it was home to Child’s Restaurant and Karry’s Billiards & Bowling, while the shops next to it included United Cigar Stores and Royal Restaurant. The building’s corner location has made it a prime spot for businesses to set up shop and has seen its fair share of transformation. From Friar’s Tavern and Nickelodeon to the Hard Rock Café, it has been a hub of entertainment.

Today, the building is occupied by Shopper’s Drug Mart and Friar’s Music Museum (City of Toronto Archives, Alexandra Studio fonds, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 49)

June 25, 1952/April 21, 2024 - Looking south on Yonge St from Alexander St towards College St/Carlton St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The archive photo shows the construction of the Yonge Subway (Line 1) and captures the St Charles Tavern and clock tower, Syd Silver Clothing, and the Eaton's College Street Store in the distance. Also visible is a portion of the Grosvenor Hotel on the left. In contrast, the present-day photo shows how the heritage-designated St Charles Tavern clock tower and the façade of the neighbouring building, which once housed Syd Silver's, have been restored and incorporated into the Halo Residences - a 45-storey condo tower. Notice College Park, previously known as Eaton's College Street Store, in the background, with the Canadian flag proudly flying on its roof
June 25, 1952/April 21, 2024 – Looking south on Yonge St from Alexander St towards College St/Carlton St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo shows the construction of the Yonge Subway (Line 1) and captures the St Charles Tavern and clock tower, Syd Silver Clothing, and the Eaton’s College Street Store in the distance. Also visible is a portion of the Grosvenor Hotel on the left.

In contrast, the present-day photo shows how the heritage-designated St Charles Tavern clock tower and the façade of the neighbouring building, which once housed Syd Silver’s, have been restored and incorporated into the Halo Residences – a 45-storey condo tower. Notice College Park, previously known as Eaton’s College Street Store, in the background, with the Canadian flag proudly flying on its roof (City of Toronto Archives, Series 574, File 85, ID 491063 – Brigdens Limited photographer)

May 30, 1974/April 21, 2024 – Looking southwest along Yonge St from Breadalbane St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.
In the archive photo, the St Charles Tavern clock tower is an impressive sight, standing tall in the distance, while the Eaton's College Street Store is also visible. Meanwhile, the foreground is filled with the businesses that lined the street at the time, such as Tuxedo Junction, Radio City, and Funland.
The present-day photo showcases the current streetscape. The top of the St Charles Tavern clock tower and the rooftop of Eaton's store, with the Canadian flag fluttering, are still visible in the distance
May 30, 1974/April 21, 2024 – Looking southwest along Yonge St from Breadalbane St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

In the archive photo, the St Charles Tavern clock tower is an impressive sight, standing tall in the distance, while the Eaton’s College Street Store is also visible. Meanwhile, the foreground is filled with the businesses that lined the street at the time, such as Tuxedo Junction, Radio City, and Funland.

The present-day photo showcases the current streetscape. The top of the St Charles Tavern clock tower and the rooftop of Eaton’s store, with the Canadian flag fluttering, are still visible in the distance (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 2, Item 70)

February 1971/April 21, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Bloor St W, in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto.

The archive photo is a glimpse into the past, showing two Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) branches on either side of The Pilot Tavern. This historic tavern, which has been around for 80 years, was named in honour of the heroic efforts of Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) flyers during World War II. The Pilot Tavern used to be situated at 800 Yonge St, a little north of Bloor St W. It operated at this location from 1944 until 1972, when it had to be relocated to accommodate Two Bloor West tower.

Nowadays, CIBC is still a tenant in the 34-storey office tower, while The Pilot moved to 22 Cumberland St, just around the corner, where it continues to operate to this day
February 1971/April 21, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Bloor St W, in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto.

The archive photo is a glimpse into the past, showing two Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) branches on either side of The Pilot Tavern. This historic tavern, which has been around for 80 years, was named in honour of the heroic efforts of Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) flyers during World War II. The Pilot Tavern used to be situated at 800 Yonge St, a little north of Bloor St W. It operated at this location from 1944 until 1972, when it had to be relocated to accommodate Two Bloor West tower.

Nowadays, CIBC is still a tenant in the 34-storey office tower, while The Pilot moved to 22 Cumberland St, just around the corner, where it continues to operate to this day (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 2, ID 110)

September 19, 1929/April 21, 2024 - Looking south down Yonge St from just north of Bloor St in the Bay-Cloverhill and Yorkville neighbourhoods of Toronto. 
The archive photo provides a fascinating glimpse into the past of two major streets, showcasing a stark contrast with their present-day appearance. One notable feature in the picture is the streetcar tracks that used to run along these streets. The photo also shows Stollery's Menswear store and, further down the street, the sign for the Uptown Theatre. 
In the present-day photo, the old Stollery building has been replaced with a modern condo development, and only the facade of the Uptown Theatre remains. Meanwhile, the left side of the photo shows the base of the towering 76-storey One Bloor residence
September 19, 1929/April 21, 2024 – Looking south down Yonge St from just north of Bloor St in the Bay-Cloverhill and Yorkville neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The archive photo provides a fascinating glimpse into the past of two major streets, showcasing a stark contrast with their present-day appearance. One notable feature in the picture is the streetcar tracks that used to run along these streets. The photo also shows Stollery’s Menswear store and, further down the street, the sign for the Uptown Theatre.

In the present-day photo, the old Stollery building has been replaced with a modern condo development, and only the facade of the Uptown Theatre remains. Meanwhile, the left side of the photo shows the base of the towering 76-storey One Bloor residence (Library and Archives Canada PA-3654583)

Between 1987-91/April 21, 2024 - The Frank Stollery Parkette is located at the southwest corner of Yonge St and Davenport Rd in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto. The parkette is situated along an ancient Aboriginal Peoples trail that traces the winding route of Davenport Rd.

Mr Stollery established his haberdashery (men's clothing and accessories) business in 1901 on Yonge St. Within a few years, he moved his shop to its iconic location on the southwest corner of Yonge and Bloor, where it remained for over a century. Stollery's was a prominent fixture in the city, known for its quality men's and women's clothing and customer service.

However, after 114 years in business, the store closed its doors in 2015, marking the end of an era for Toronto's retail scene
Between 1987-91/April 21, 2024 – The Frank Stollery Parkette is located at the southwest corner of Yonge St and Davenport Rd in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto. The parkette is situated along an ancient Aboriginal Peoples trail that traces the winding route of Davenport Rd.

Mr Stollery established his haberdashery (men’s clothing and accessories) business in 1901 on Yonge St. Within a few years, he moved his shop to its iconic location on the southwest corner of Yonge and Bloor, where it remained for over a century. Stollery’s was a prominent fixture in the city, known for its quality men’s and women’s clothing and customer service.

However, after 114 years in business, the store closed its doors in 2015, marking the end of an era for Toronto’s retail scene (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 518, Item 11)

May 2013/February 3, 2024 - Looking southwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Bloor St W in the Bay-Cloverhill and Yorkville neighbourhoods of Toronto. The 2013 photo shows Stollery's store, while the present-day photo shows the old Stollery building has been replaced with The One condo tower development (Google Maps)
May 2013/February 3, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Bloor St W in the Bay-Cloverhill and Yorkville neighbourhoods of Toronto. The 2013 photo shows Stollery’s store, while the present-day photo shows the old Stollery building has been replaced with The One condo tower development (Google Maps)

November 4, 1930/April 21, 2024 — Looking southeast from Dundas St W toward the corner of Dundas Sq and Yonge St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The area has evolved over the past 90 years, but one of the buildings that remains is the white three-storey building in the centre-left background. It was constructed in 1918 for Child's Restaurant, as shown in the archive photo. Over the years, it has been occupied by various establishments, including Friar's Tavern, Nickelodeon, and the Hard Rock Café. Nowadays, the building is home to a Shopper's Drug Mart, and Friar's Music Museum can be found on the second floor
November 4, 1930/April 21, 2024 — Looking southeast from Dundas St W toward the corner of Dundas Sq and Yonge St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The area has evolved over the past 90 years, but one of the buildings that remains is the white three-storey building in the centre-left background. It was constructed in 1918 for Child’s Restaurant, as shown in the archive photo. Over the years, it has been occupied by various establishments, including Friar’s Tavern, Nickelodeon, and the Hard Rock Café.

Nowadays, the building is home to a Shopper’s Drug Mart, and Friar’s Music Museum can be found on the second floor (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 8158)

1970s/ April 21, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Dundas Sq in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. 
The archive photo shows Friar's Tavern and Nickelodeon sharing the building. Opening in 1963, Friar's featured jazz music during its first year. In that short time as a jazz venue, some notable performers at the tavern included Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk, as well as Canada's own Oscar Peterson. Friar's Tavern closed in 1976, and even though it was short-lived, the venue played a legendary part in Toronto's music history. 
The 3-storey building was constructed in 1918 for the American restaurant chain Child's Restaurants. Today, the building is home to a Shopper's Drug Mart, and Friar's Music Museum can be found on the second floor
1970s/ April 21, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Dundas Sq in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo shows Friar’s Tavern and Nickelodeon sharing the building. Opening in 1963, Friar’s featured jazz music during its first year. In that short time as a jazz venue, some notable performers at the tavern included Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk, as well as Canada’s own Oscar Peterson. Friar’s Tavern closed in 1976, and even though it was short-lived, the venue played a legendary part in Toronto’s music history.

The 3-storey building was constructed in 1918 for the American restaurant chain Child’s Restaurants. Today, the building is home to a Shopper’s Drug Mart, and Friar’s Music Museum can be found on the second floor (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 548, Item 24)

Between 1978-80/ April 21, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Dundas Sq in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. 
The 3-storey building was constructed in 1918 for Child's Restaurants. It was later home to Friar’s Tavern and then the Hard Rock Cafe from 1978 until 2017, as shown in the archive photo. 
Today, the building is home to a Shopper's Drug Mart, and Friar's Music Museum is located on the second floor
Between 1978-80/ April 21, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Dundas Sq in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The 3-storey building was constructed in 1918 for Child’s Restaurants. It was later home to Friar’s Tavern and then the Hard Rock Cafe from 1978 until 2017, as shown in the archive photo.

Today, the building is home to a Shopper’s Drug Mart, and Friar’s Music Museum is located on the second floor (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 308, Item 3)

September 22, 1922/April 21, 2024 - Looking southwest from the corner of Yonge St and Dundas Sq in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. 
The archive photo shows the building when it was home to Child's Restaurant, along with a newsstand and streetcars when they travelled on Yonge St. 
Different establishments occupied the building throughout the years, from Friar's Tavern and Nickelodeon to the Hard Rock Café and today, as Shopper's Drug Mart (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 35)
September 22, 1922/April 21, 2024 – Looking southwest from the corner of Yonge St and Dundas Sq in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo shows the building when it was home to Child’s Restaurant, along with a newsstand and streetcars when they travelled on Yonge St.

Different establishments occupied the building throughout the years, from Friar’s Tavern and Nickelodeon to the Hard Rock Café and today, as Shopper’s Drug Mart (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 35)

1972/February 10, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Jarvis St and Richmond St E St, in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto
1972/February 10, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Jarvis St and Richmond St E St, in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 22, Item 3)
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