Past & Present – Part 46

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November 20, 1923/February 25, 2024 – Looking east from the Gerrard Street Bridge towards Broadview Ave in the North Riverdale neighbourhood of Toronto. The Old Don Jail is visible in both photos on the left. Notice the photographer's shadow in the lower left portion of the archive photo
November 20, 1923/February 25, 2024 – Looking east from the Gerrard Street Bridge towards Broadview Ave in the North Riverdale neighbourhood of Toronto. The Old Don Jail is visible in both photos on the left. Notice the photographer’s shadow in the lower left portion of the archive photo (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 2779)

1972/2023 – Looking southwest at the corner of Victoria St and Gould St, in the Garden District of Toronto. Looking at the archive photo, it's clear that the corner of Victoria St and Gould St used to offer a completely different view than what we see today. In the past, you could see the backs of various Yonge St shops and businesses, including a theatre and the Hotel Edison, as well as the Old City Hall Clock Tower and Toronto City Hall in the distance. Nowadays, this corner is home to a building that houses the Toronto Metropolitan University Campus Store, parking, and The Tenor retail, office, and entertainment complex
1972/2023 – Looking southwest at the corner of Victoria St and Gould St, in the Garden District of Toronto.

Looking at the archive photo, it’s clear that the corner of Victoria St and Gould St used to offer a completely different view than what we see today. In the past, you could see the backs of various Yonge St shops and businesses, including a theatre and the Hotel Edison, as well as the Old City Hall Clock Tower and Toronto City Hall in the distance.

Nowadays, this corner is home to a building that houses the Toronto Metropolitan University Campus Store, parking, and The Tenor retail, office, and entertainment complex (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 17, Item 13)

July 1, 1970/March 16, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the 22-storey building at 423 Yonge St north of Gerrard St E, between McGill St and Granby St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. In 2016/17, artist Adrian Hayles painted the Yonge Street Music History murals on the building's south and north sides. The south-facing mural showcases various musicians and bands, including Lonnie Johnson, Jay Douglas, Salome Bey, Goddo, RUSH, Dizzy Gillespie, Kim Mitchell, Carole Pope, Cathy Young, Jon & Lee from The Checkmates and The Five Rogues
July 1, 1970/March 16, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the 22-storey building at 423 Yonge St north of Gerrard St E, between McGill St and Granby St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

In 2016/17, artist Adrian Hayles painted the Yonge Street Music History murals on the building’s south and north sides. The south-facing mural showcases various musicians and bands, including Lonnie Johnson, Jay Douglas, Salome Bey, Goddo, RUSH, Dizzy Gillespie, Kim Mitchell, Carole Pope, Cathy Young, Jon & Lee from The Checkmates and The Five Rogues (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 3, Item 2)

1972/May 23, 2021 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Church St, in the  Garden District of Toronto. 

The archive photo shows that the building directly at the corner, 60 Queen St E, was Thrifty's Sport Shop. It later became home to Public Optical, Gino's Pizza, then Shawarma's King, which has since closed. A City of Toronto Heritage Report stated that the first two stories of the building date back to the 1840s, while the third story was added circa 1901, adding to its architectural significance. There are plans to incorporate the building's historic façade, including its unique turret and the facades from neighbouring structures, into a 57-storey tower known as 60 Queen St East Condos.

In the archive photo, also notice the building with the tower on the far right. It was Cooke's Presbyterian Church and stood from 1891 until 1982
1972/May 23, 2021 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Church St, in the Garden District of Toronto.

The archive photo shows that the building directly at the corner, 60 Queen St E, was Thrifty’s Sport Shop. It later became home to Public Optical, Gino’s Pizza, then Shawarma’s King, which has since closed. A City of Toronto Heritage Report stated that the first two stories of the building date back to the 1840s, while the third story was added circa 1901, adding to its architectural significance. There are plans to incorporate the building’s historic façade, including its unique turret and the facades from neighbouring structures, into a 57-storey tower known as 60 Queen St East Condos.

In the archive photo, also notice the building with the tower on the far right. It was Cooke’s Presbyterian Church and stood from 1891 until 1982 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 51, Item 7)

December 1987/July 2021 - Looking north towards the Gladstone Hotel/House at 1214 Queen St W and Gladstone Ave in Toronto's Queen Street West Art and Design District. The archive photo shows when it was known as the Gladstone Hotel and featured the Melody Lounge (on the east side of the hotel’s first floor). Built in 1889/90, the Gladstone House has since been restored and renovated and stands as a proud neighbourhood landmark. The boutique hotel also features a restaurant, bar, and event spaces, making it a popular destination for locals and tourists alike
December 1987/July 2021 – Looking north towards the Gladstone Hotel/House at 1214 Queen St W and Gladstone Ave in Toronto’s Queen Street West Art and Design District.

The archive photo shows when it was known as the Gladstone Hotel and featured the Melody Lounge (on the east side of the hotel’s first floor).

Built in 1889/90, the Gladstone House has since been restored and renovated and stands as a proud neighbourhood landmark. The boutique hotel also features a restaurant, bar, and event spaces, making it a popular destination for locals and tourists alike (Toronto Public Library 2021-25-13-4, Peter MacCallum – photographer)

August 31, 1949/March 10, 2024 - Looking west along Edward St from Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Notice Hotel Ford in the left background of the archive photo. The hotel opened in 1928, and the building was demolished in the summer of 1974. It's interesting to see how this street has changed over time
August 31, 1949/March 10, 2024 – Looking west along Edward St from Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Notice Hotel Ford in the left background of the archive photo. The hotel opened in 1928, and the building was demolished in the summer of 1974. It’s interesting to see how this street has changed over time (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 1982)

April 30, 1977/March 16, 2024 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Walton St just south of Gerrard St W in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo shows that Colosseum Pizza Spaghetti House once occupied the corner at 372 Yonge St.

In the 1960s, Club Bluenote was located above the restaurant. The after-hours rhythm and blues dance hall played a role in the Yonge Street music scene. It was a popular venue for international artists such as Jimmy Reed, Jackie Shane, Stevie Wonder, the Righteous Brothers, and the Supremes. After performing at major venues in the city, they often played impromptu late-night sets at the club. Club Bluenote was in operation for about ten years and closed in 1969
April 30, 1977/March 16, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Walton St just south of Gerrard St W in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo shows that Colosseum Pizza Spaghetti House once occupied the corner at 372 Yonge St.

In the 1960s, Club Bluenote was located above the restaurant. The after-hours rhythm and blues dance hall played a role in the Yonge Street music scene. It was a popular venue for international artists such as Jimmy Reed, Jackie Shane, Stevie Wonder, the Righteous Brothers, and the Supremes. After performing at major venues in the city, they often played impromptu late-night sets at the club. Club Bluenote was in operation for about ten years and closed in 1969 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 3, Item 21)

October 5, 1932/2023 – Looking southwest along Bay St from Edward St in downtown Toronto. The building in the right foreground is the Toronto Coach Terminal. Built exclusively for interurban motor coach travellers, the terminal opened its doors in 1931. It was a major transportation hub for nine decades, closing in 2021. In addition to the coach terminal, the images also capture the McKnight Building, a five-storey commercial building constructed in the mid-1920s. Early tenants of the McKnight Building included dentists, fashion businesses, a music instructor, a tobacco shop, and a post office substation
October 5, 1932/2023 – Looking southwest along Bay St from Edward St in downtown Toronto.

The building in the right foreground is the Toronto Coach Terminal. Built exclusively for interurban motor coach travellers, the terminal opened its doors in 1931. It was a major transportation hub for nine decades, closing in 2021.

In addition to the coach terminal, the images also capture the McKnight Building, a five-storey commercial building constructed in the mid-1920s. Early tenants of the McKnight Building included dentists, fashion businesses, a music instructor, a tobacco shop, and a post office substation (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9462)

July 22, 1983/ March 10, 2024 – Looking south from Queen St W and John St towards the Wesley Building and the CN Tower in Toronto’s Entertainment District. The CN Tower is a popular tourist destination and offers amazing views of the city from its observation decks
July 22, 1983/ March 10, 2024 – Looking south from Queen St W and John St towards the Wesley Building and the CN Tower in Toronto’s Entertainment District. The CN Tower is a popular tourist destination and offers amazing views of the city from its observation decks (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 47, Item 98)

1944/March 10, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the storefronts on Bloor St W from Bartlett Ave, in the Bloorcourt Village of Toronto. Notice in the archive photo there were once streetcar tracks along Bloor St. The architecture and character of this area have remained intact
1944/March 10, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the storefronts on Bloor St W from Bartlett Ave, in the Bloorcourt Village of Toronto. Notice in the archive photo there were once streetcar tracks along Bloor St. The architecture and character of this area have remained intact (Toronto Public Library R-4505)

March 30, 1937/March 10, 2024 – Looking northeast from the corner of Elizabeth St and Hagerman St in downtown Toronto. This corner is located behind new City Hall. The archive photo shows the wooden structures once at the corner with Hotel Ford in the background. The hotel was at the northeast corner of Bay St and Dundas St W from 1928 until 1974
March 30, 1937/March 10, 2024 – Looking northeast from the corner of Elizabeth St and Hagerman St in downtown Toronto. This corner is located behind new City Hall. The archive photo shows the wooden structures once at the corner with Hotel Ford in the background. The hotel was at the northeast corner of Bay St and Dundas St W from 1928 until 1974 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 33, Item 159)

May 3, 1975/March 10, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Church St in the Garden District of Toronto. 

The building at 260 Church St was originally The Sterling Bank of Canada, then CIBC and later Pizza Pizza. The building received heritage status from the city in 2021. In the background of the archive photo, notice the steeple of St Michael’s Cathedral Basilica on the left and the CN Tower under construction on the right.
 
The present-day photo shows the heritage-designated bank building being incorporated into the modern, 52-storey condo tower known as 252 Church. This is a good example of preserving historical buildings while meeting modern urban living needs
May 3, 1975/March 10, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Church St in the Garden District of Toronto.

The building at 260 Church St was originally The Sterling Bank of Canada, then CIBC and later Pizza Pizza. The building received heritage status from the city in 2021. In the background of the archive photo, notice the steeple of St Michael’s Cathedral Basilica on the left and the CN Tower under construction on the right.

The present-day photo shows the heritage-designated bank building being incorporated into the modern, 52-storey condo tower known as 252 Church. This is a good example of preserving historical buildings while meeting modern urban living needs (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 47, Item 46)

April 4, 2021/March 10, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Church St in the Garden District of Toronto. 

The building at 260 Church St was originally The Sterling Bank of Canada, then CIBC and later Pizza Pizza. The building received heritage status from the city in 2021. 

The present-day photo shows the heritage-designated former bank building incorporated into the modern 252 Church condo tower, an example of preserving historical buildings while meeting modern urban living needs.
April 4, 2021/March 10, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Church St in the Garden District of Toronto.

The building at 260 Church St was originally The Sterling Bank of Canada, then CIBC and later Pizza Pizza. The building received heritage status from the city in 2021.

The present-day photo shows the heritage-designated former bank building incorporated into the modern 252 Church condo tower, an example of preserving historical buildings while meeting modern urban living needs.

1972/March 10, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Church St and Richmond St E, in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The four-storey building was constructed in 1882, designed by architect David Roberts Jr, and was originally the Windsor House. It was renamed the New Windsor House, as shown in the archive photo, and later McVeigh's Irish Pub
1972/March 10, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Church St and Richmond St E, in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

The four-storey building was constructed in 1882, designed by architect David Roberts Jr, and was originally the Windsor House. It was renamed the New Windsor House, as shown in the archive photo, and later McVeigh’s Irish Pub (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 51, Item 5)

Between 1979-84/April 2023 – Looking southwest along Yonge St between Yorkville Ave and Cumberland St in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto.

The stretch of Yonge St is home to several 19th-century buildings. Among them is the Charles Frogley Building, located directly at the corner. It was where Mr Frogley operated his bakery. Adjacent to Frogley's is the James Weir Buildings, followed by a row of commercial buildings. These heritage-designated structures have been beautifully restored and today are retail space fronting the 62-storey condo known as 11 Yorkville
Between 1979-84/April 2023 – Looking southwest along Yonge St between Yorkville Ave and Cumberland St in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto.

The stretch of Yonge St is home to several 19th-century buildings. Among them is the Charles Frogley Building, located directly at the corner. It was where Mr Frogley operated his bakery. Adjacent to Frogley’s is the James Weir Buildings, followed by a row of commercial buildings. These heritage-designated structures have been beautifully restored and today are retail space fronting the 62-storey condo known as 11 Yorkville (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 613, Item 30)

July 17, 1973/April 2023 – Looking west at the corner of Yonge St and Yorkville Ave, in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto. Known as the Charles Frogley Building, the brick structure was constructed in two phases. The building's original three stories were built circa 1855 as a residence. In 1885, Charles J Frogley expanded the building, adding Second Empire-style features, including oriel windows on the second floor, a mansard roof, and a west wing. He also included the word "FROGLEY'S" in the pediment. Mr Frogley operated his bakery out of the building. In recent years, the building has been home to The Cookbook Store until 2014. This heritage-designated building underwent a restoration and was recently used as a presentation centre for a condo development
July 17, 1973/April 2023 – Looking west at the corner of Yonge St and Yorkville Ave, in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto. Known as the Charles Frogley Building, the brick structure was constructed in two phases. The building’s original three stories were built circa 1855 as a residence.

In 1885, Charles J Frogley expanded the building, adding Second Empire-style features, including oriel windows on the second floor, a mansard roof, and a west wing. He also included the word “FROGLEY’S” in the pediment. Mr Frogley operated his bakery out of the building.

In recent years, the building has been home to The Cookbook Store until 2014. This heritage-designated building underwent a restoration and was recently used as a presentation centre for a condo development (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 1, Item 142)

March 1961/March 10, 2024 – Looking southeast at the corner of University Ave and Armoury St in downtown Toronto.

The archive photo shows the University Avenue Armouries, constructed between 1891 and 1893. During the 1950s and ’60s, University Avenue was changing. High-rise structures were being built, plus it was thought that the size of the military training building was no longer needed. Many fought to preserve the grand castle-like structure as a landmark; however, it was demolished in 1963.

Today, the corner is home to the University Avenue Courthouse – Superior Court of Justice. Notice Toronto City Hall in the background on the left of the present-day photo and Osgoode Hall on the right
March 1961/March 10, 2024 – Looking southeast at the corner of University Ave and Armoury St in downtown Toronto.

The archive photo shows the University Avenue Armouries, constructed between 1891 and 1893. During the 1950s and ’60s, University Avenue was changing. High-rise structures were being built, plus it was thought that the size of the military training building was no longer needed. Many fought to preserve the grand castle-like structure as a landmark; however, it was demolished in 1963.

Today, the corner is home to the University Avenue Courthouse – Superior Court of Justice. Notice Toronto City Hall in the background on the left of the present-day photo and Osgoode Hall on the right (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 1, ID 64)

1972/February 2024 – Looking northwest at Dundas St E and Sherbourne St in Toronto’s Garden District. The archive photo shows when the building at the corner was home to George’s Spaghetti House. Doug Cole, the founder of Toronto’s jazz movement, opened the live jazz club in 1956. In 1983, Mr Cole sold George’s Spaghetti House, and a year later, the new owner moved the jazz club up to the second floor. The building was later home to True Love Cafe from 2004 but has since closed. In 2021, the building was listed on the city’s heritage register as part of the Garden District Heritage Conservation District
1972/February 2024 – Looking northwest at Dundas St E and Sherbourne St in Toronto’s Garden District.

The archive photo shows when the building at the corner was home to George’s Spaghetti House. Doug Cole, the founder of Toronto’s jazz movement, opened the live jazz club in 1956. In 1983, Mr Cole sold George’s Spaghetti House, and a year later, the new owner moved the jazz club up to the second floor. The building was later home to True Love Cafe from 2004 but has since closed.

In 2021, the building was listed on the city’s heritage register as part of the Garden District Heritage Conservation District (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 50, Item 8)

1902/April 20, 1904 - Looking north up Bay St from north of Front St W in downtown Toronto. The archive photos show a before (top) and after of the Great Fire of Toronto 1904 (bottom) with Old City Hall Clock Tower in the background. The fire broke out on the evening of April 19th and left the downtown core in ruins. Nearly 100 buildings were destroyed, 5,000 jobs were affected, and over $10 million in damages (1904 dollars) were caused. The fire revealed Toronto’s need for safer building codes and a high-pressure water system. It led to new bylaws for fire-resistant construction. Today, this area is part of the city’s Financial District
1902/April 20, 1904 – Looking north up Bay St from north of Front St W in downtown Toronto. The archive photos show a before (top) and after of the Great Fire of Toronto 1904 (bottom) with Old City Hall Clock Tower in the background.

The fire broke out on the evening of April 19th and left the downtown core in ruins. Nearly 100 buildings were destroyed, 5,000 jobs were affected, and over $10 million in damages (1904 dollars) were caused. The fire revealed Toronto’s need for safer building codes and a high-pressure water system. It led to new bylaws for fire-resistant construction.

Today, this area is part of the city’s Financial District (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 2 & Fonds 1587, Series 409, Item 61)

March 7, 1928/March 2, 2024 – Looking east along Front St W from west of Simcoe St in downtown Toronto.

The archive photo shows the Hotel Carls-Rite on the left, the Hotel Daly on the right, and the previous Union Station in the background on the right. 

Today, the northeast corner of Front St W and Simcoe St is home to an office tower known as 160 Front, while the southeast corner is the site of the heritage-designated Canadian National Express Building
March 7, 1928/March 2, 2024 – Looking east along Front St W from west of Simcoe St in downtown Toronto.

The archive photo shows the Hotel Carls-Rite on the left, the Hotel Daly on the right, and the previous Union Station in the background on the right.

Today, the northeast corner of Front St W and Simcoe St is home to an office tower known as 160 Front, while the southeast corner is the site of the heritage-designated Canadian National Express Building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 5701)

April 15, 1911/February 25, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the intersection of Dundas St E (once called Wilton Cres/Ave) and Sherbourne St, in the Garden District of Toronto.

The archive photo shows streetcar tracks being laid, and behind the fence on the left was once the site of The Belmont, a private boarding house. 
In the present-day photo, the building on the left was once home to George's Spaghetti House and later True Love Café, which has since closed (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 21)
April 15, 1911/February 25, 2024 – Looking northwest towards the intersection of Dundas St E (once called Wilton Cres/Ave) and Sherbourne St, in the Garden District of Toronto.

The archive photo shows streetcar tracks being laid, and behind the fence on the left was once the site of The Belmont, a private boarding house. In the present-day photo, the building on the left was once home to George’s Spaghetti House and later True Love Café, which has since closed (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 21)

1972/February 25, 2024 – Looking west along Thompson St from Broadview Ave, north of Queen St E, in the South Riverdale neighbourhood of Toronto. In the archive photo, notice Becker’s on the right. The Becker Milk Company began in Toronto in 1957. It was the first convenience store in Canada to be open 7 days a week, for 14 hours a day, and in its heyday, there were over 500 stores in 120 cities. Today, the building is home to ANAF Coronation 259
1972/February 25, 2024 – Looking west along Thompson St from Broadview Ave, north of Queen St E, in the South Riverdale neighbourhood of Toronto.

In the archive photo, notice Becker’s on the right. The Becker Milk Company began in Toronto in 1957. It was the first convenience store in Canada to be open 7 days a week, for 14 hours a day, and in its heyday, there were over 500 stores in 120 cities. Today, the building is home to ANAF Coronation 259 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 25, Item 16)

1980s/March 2, 2024 - Looking southeast on Elm St from Bay St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo shows Old Angelo’s Restaurant in the right foreground and A & A Records & Tapes in the distance on Yonge St. Today, the site of the former restaurant is home to Freda’s and Toronto Metropolitan University, formerly Ryerson University, now occupies the space where A & A’s used to be
1980s/March 2, 2024 – Looking southeast on Elm St from Bay St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo shows Old Angelo’s Restaurant in the right foreground and A & A Records & Tapes in the distance on Yonge St. Today, the site of the former restaurant is home to Freda’s and Toronto Metropolitan University, formerly Ryerson University, now occupies the space where A & A’s used to be (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 20, Item 25)

1972/February 25, 2024 - Looking north from Eastern Ave and Sackville St towards Sackville Street Public School, today Inglenook Community School in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto.

The grounds are also a National Historic Site of Canada, as it was the site of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn's home from 1834 to 1890. The Blackburns escaped slavery in Kentucky in 1831 and settled in Toronto. They established the city's first cab company, helped build Little Trinity Church, assisted other freedom-seekers, and worked for Abolition
1972/February 25, 2024 – Looking north from Eastern Ave and Sackville St towards Sackville Street Public School, today Inglenook Community School in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto.

The grounds are also a National Historic Site of Canada, as it was the site of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn‘s home from 1834 to 1890. The Blackburns escaped slavery in Kentucky in 1831 and settled in Toronto. They established the city’s first cab company, helped build Little Trinity Church, assisted other freedom-seekers, and worked for Abolition (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 11, Item 4)

March 1987/January 2024 – Looking northeast along Yonge St just north of Shuter St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto
March 1987/January 2024 – Looking northeast along Yonge St just north of Shuter St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 3, ID 130)

September 1960/January 1, 2024 – Looking east on Front St W from Bathurst St in the Fashion District and CityPlace neighbourhood of Toronto. In the archive photo, you can notice the Royal York Hotel in the distance. In contrast, in the present-day photo, the CN Tower is visible. It's interesting how much the cityscape has changed over the past 60+ years
September 1960/January 1, 2024 – Looking east on Front St W from Bathurst St in the Fashion District and CityPlace neighbourhood of Toronto. In the archive photo, you can notice the Royal York Hotel in the distance. In contrast, in the present-day photo, the CN Tower is visible. It’s interesting how much the cityscape has changed over the past 60+ years (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 100, Item 310)

1972/2024 – Looking northeast from the intersection of Colborne St and Leader Lane in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows Tom Jones Steak House with the steeple of The Cathedral Church of St James in the background. The three-storey brick building at the corner was built in phases, with much of it constructed in the 1800s. In the late 1870s, the building was occupied by Foster James, who operated a mathematical instruments business. By 1884, Grand & Toy opened their first store. During the stationary company's occupancy, a two-storey wing was added on the building's north side. In the mid-1890s, it became the Hub Hotel, then later housed jewel and jewel/watch display case businesses. From the late 1910s until about 1964, the property was the site of Smellie & Sons Ltd, a jewellery manufacturer, who added the third storey on the north wing. For over half a century, from 1966 to 2021, the building was home to Tom Jones Steak House. Nowadays, the heritage-designated property at 17 Leader Lane/40 Colborne St is commercial space. The office tower surrounding the building's north and east sides is known as 65 King East
1972/2024 – Looking northeast from the intersection of Colborne St and Leader Lane in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows Tom Jones Steak House with the steeple of The Cathedral Church of St James in the background.

The three-storey brick building at the corner was built in phases, with much of it constructed in the 1800s. In the late 1870s, the building was occupied by Foster James, who operated a mathematical instruments business. By 1884, Grand & Toy opened their first store. During the stationary company’s occupancy, a two-storey wing was added on the building’s north side. In the mid-1890s, it became the Hub Hotel, then later housed jewel and jewel/watch display case businesses. From the late 1910s until about 1964, the property was the site of Smellie & Sons Ltd, a jewellery manufacturer, who added the third storey on the north wing.

For over half a century, from 1966 to 2021, the building was home to Tom Jones Steak House. Nowadays, the heritage-designated property at 17 Leader Lane/40 Colborne St is commercial space. The office tower surrounding the building’s north and east sides is known as 65 King East (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 69, Item 28)

May 7, 1924/January 21, 2024 - Looking southeast toward the former public lavatory on Danforth Ave, just west of Broadview Ave in the North Riverdale neighbourhood of Toronto. Completed in 1920, city architect George FW Price designed the 1½ storey brick-clad building to complement the area. The building has been repurposed and today is home to a French language school
May 7, 1924/January 21, 2024 – Looking southeast toward the former public lavatory on Danforth Ave, just west of Broadview Ave in the North Riverdale neighbourhood of Toronto. Completed in 1920, city architect George FW Price designed the 1½ storey brick-clad building to complement the area. The building has been repurposed and today is home to a French language school (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 1, Item 629)

Circa 1900/2023 – Looking southwest at Adelaide St E and Toronto St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood. The archive photo shows the access tower to Toronto's first public underground lavatory, which opened in 1896. By the late 1930s, the men-only lavatory closed due to its location directly in the middle of Toronto St and, therefore, a traffic menace
Circa 1900/2023 – Looking southwest at Adelaide St E and Toronto St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood. The archive photo shows the access tower to Toronto’s first public underground lavatory, which opened in 1896. By the late 1930s, the men-only lavatory closed due to its location directly in the middle of Toronto St and, therefore, a traffic menace (Toronto Public Library R-5935)

September 27, 1930/2023 – Looking southeast towards the intersection of Bay St and Dundas St W in downtown Toronto.

Notice the McKnight Building in the right foreground of the archive and present-day photos. The five-storey commercial building was constructed in the mid-1920s and designed by architects Smith & Everett. Early tenants included fashion businesses, dentists, a music instructor, a tobacco shop and a post office substation.

It’s also worth mentioning that one of the building’s architects, Sandford Fleming Smith, was the grandson of Sir Sandford Fleming, who was the Scottish-Canadian engineer, scientist, and inventor
September 27, 1930/2023 – Looking southeast towards the intersection of Bay St and Dundas St W in downtown Toronto.

Notice the McKnight Building in the right foreground of the archive and present-day photos. The five-storey commercial building was constructed in the mid-1920s and designed by architects Smith & Everett. Early tenants included fashion businesses, dentists, a music instructor, a tobacco shop and a post office substation.

It’s also worth mentioning that one of the building’s architects, Sandford Fleming Smith, was the grandson of Sir Sandford Fleming, who was the Scottish-Canadian engineer, scientist, and inventor (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, File 76, Item 8071)

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