Past & Present – Part 45

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1972/February 25, 2024 – Looking northwest from Eastern Ave and Sumach St towards Sackville Street Public School, today Inglenook Community School, in Toronto's Corktown neighbourhood. The grounds are also a National Historic Site of Canada, as it was the site of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn's home from 1834 to 1890. After escaping slavery in Kentucky in 1831, the Blackburns settled in Toronto, becoming well-known community members. They established the city's first cab company, helped build Little Trinity Church, assisted other freedom-seekers, and worked tirelessly for Abolition
1972/February 25, 2024 – Looking northwest from Eastern Ave and Sumach St towards Sackville Street Public School, today Inglenook Community School, in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood.

The grounds are also a National Historic Site of Canada, as it was the site of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn‘s home from 1834 to 1890. After escaping slavery in Kentucky in 1831, the Blackburns settled in Toronto, becoming well-known community members. They established the city’s first cab company, helped build Little Trinity Church, assisted other freedom-seekers, and worked tirelessly for Abolition (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 19, Item 31)

1952/March 2, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Wellington St E in downtown Toronto.

The archive photo provides a glimpse into a bygone era. The first three stories of the building, once at the corner, were constructed in 1860/61 to house the Royal Insurance Company.

In 1904/05, the building became the head office for Gutta Percha & Rubber Limited, which added two additional stories to the structure. An interesting feature of the building was the window at the top front corner, designed in the shape of the Maltese Cross, which was the company's trademark. Gutta Percha & Rubber Limited specialized in manufacturing rubber goods such as boots, shoes, fire hoses, carriage and motor tires. The term "gutta-percha" refers to a natural latex product made from the sap of Palaquium trees.

After its time as the rubber company's headquarters, the building became known as the Sainsbury Building (shown in the archive photo), serving as a hub for various offices. It was demolished in the early 1960s to make way for a parking lot, and today, the site is occupied by a modern mirrored office building
1952/March 2, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Wellington St E in downtown Toronto.

The archive photo provides a glimpse into a bygone era. The first three stories of the building, once at the corner, were constructed in 1860/61 to house the Royal Insurance Company.

In 1904/05, the building became the head office for Gutta Percha & Rubber Limited, which added two additional stories to the structure. An interesting feature of the building was the window at the top front corner, designed in the shape of the Maltese Cross, which was the company’s trademark. Gutta Percha & Rubber Limited specialized in manufacturing rubber goods such as boots, shoes, fire hoses, carriage and motor tires. The term “gutta-percha” refers to a natural latex product made from the sap of Palaquium trees.

After its time as the rubber company’s headquarters, the building became known as the Sainsbury Building (shown in the archive photo), serving as a hub for various offices. It was demolished in the early 1960s to make way for a parking lot, and today, the site is occupied by a modern mirrored office building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 731)

1980s/March 2, 2024 – Looking north toward the John Street Roundhouse and water tower in what's known today as Roundhouse Park in Toronto.

The water tower has stood alongside the roundhouse since 1929. It stored 60,000 gallons of water used for the steam process and maintenance of the Canadian Pacific Railway locomotives and passenger cars at the roundhouse.

Today, the John Street Roundhouse is home to Steam Whistle Brewing, the Toronto Railway Museum and more. Notice the InterContinental Toronto Centre in the background
1980s/March 2, 2024 – Looking north toward the John Street Roundhouse and water tower in what’s known today as Roundhouse Park in Toronto.

The water tower has stood alongside the roundhouse since 1929. It stored 60,000 gallons of water used for the steam process and maintenance of the Canadian Pacific Railway locomotives and passenger cars at the roundhouse.

Today, the John Street Roundhouse is home to Steam Whistle Brewing, the Toronto Railway Museum and more. Notice the InterContinental Toronto Centre in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 37, Item 149)

May 19, 1984/April 2023 – Looking towards 1040 Queen St W, between Brookfield St and Fennings St in Toronto's Beaconsfield Village neighbourhood. The archive photo gives us a glimpse of the past, showing what the storefront looked like when Queen Plumbing occupied it. The structure is part of a historic two-story commercial block constructed in 1883 by Samuel S Mutton, a lumber merchant and property developer. Designed in the High Victorian style, the building's original red brick cladding with buff brick details is visible in the second story of this particular portion of the building, shown in the present-day photo. The Samuel S Mutton block stretches from 1036 to 1048 Queen St W. In 2017, it was officially recognized for its historical significance and added to the city's heritage register
May 19, 1984/April 2023 – Looking towards 1040 Queen St W, between Brookfield St and Fennings St in Toronto’s Beaconsfield Village neighbourhood.

The archive photo gives us a glimpse of the past, showing what the storefront looked like when Queen Plumbing occupied it.

The structure is part of a historic two-story commercial block constructed in 1883 by Samuel S Mutton, a lumber merchant and property developer. Designed in the High Victorian style, the building’s original red brick cladding with buff brick details is visible in the second story of this particular portion of the building, shown in the present-day photo. The Samuel S Mutton block stretches from 1036 to 1048 Queen St W. In 2017, it was officially recognized for its historical significance and added to the city’s heritage register (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 70, Item 110)

December 3, 1979/March 2, 2024 – Looking southeast along Church St from just south Dundas St E, in the Garden District of Toronto. 

The archive photo shows, from left to right, the Wheel (silverware and antiques), Masters Bros (business machines), Metropolitan Coin Exchange, Toronto Retail Centre, Gourmet's Picnic, Kindness Musical Instruments, and Hewson Reid Allen & Sons (picture framing) listed in the 1978/79 Might's Metropolitan Toronto City Directory. 

The building that was once home to Hewson Reid Allen & Sons and the three-story commercial building on the right remains
December 3, 1979/March 2, 2024 – Looking southeast along Church St from just south Dundas St E, in the Garden District of Toronto.

The archive photo shows, from left to right, the Wheel (silverware and antiques), Masters Bros (business machines), Metropolitan Coin Exchange, Toronto Retail Centre, Gourmet’s Picnic, Kindness Musical Instruments, and Hewson Reid Allen & Sons (picture framing) listed in the 1978/79 Might’s Metropolitan Toronto City Directory.

The building that was once home to Hewson Reid Allen & Sons and the three-story commercial building on the right remains (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 8, Item 72)

Between 1977-83/March 2, 2024 – Looking east towards 237, 239 and 241 Yonge St just north of Shuter St towards the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto
Between 1977-83/March 2, 2024 – Looking east towards 237, 239 and 241 Yonge St just north of Shuter St towards the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 612, Item 11)

Between 1950s-60s/February 25, 2024 - Looking northeast towards the corner of Bay St and Dundas St W in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The archive photo shows when the corner was home to the Hotel Ford. Built in 1927/28, for its first year, Hotel Ford was the best hotel in the city until the Royal York Hotel opened in 1929. Hotel Ford was torn down in 1974. Since the early 1980s, the northeast corner of Dundas St W and Bay St has been home to the Atrium on Bay office building
Between 1950s-60s/February 25, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Bay St and Dundas St W in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo shows when the corner was home to the Hotel Ford. Built in 1927/28, for its first year, Hotel Ford was the best hotel in the city until the Royal York Hotel opened in 1929. Hotel Ford was torn down in 1974.

Since the early 1980s, the northeast corner of Dundas St W and Bay St has been home to the Atrium on Bay office building (Toronto Public Library TSPA_0113469F)

June 7, 1911/February 18, 2024 – Looking northeast on Dundas St E, from just west of Sherbourne St, in the Garden District of Toronto.

The archive photo shows streetcar tracks being laid on the curve of Wilton Crescent, or what is known today as Dundas St E. Behind the fence on the left was once the site of The Belmont, a private boarding house. In the distance on the right is All Saints Church, which was built in 1874.

In the present-day photo, the building on the left was once home to George's Spaghetti House and later True Love Café. After 150 years, All Saints Church is still serving the community and today is known as All Saints Church-Community Centre (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 50)
June 7, 1911/February 18, 2024 – Looking northeast on Dundas St E, from just west of Sherbourne St, in the Garden District of Toronto.

The archive photo shows streetcar tracks being laid on the curve of Wilton Crescent, or what is known today as Dundas St E. Behind the fence on the left was once the site of The Belmont, a private boarding house. In the distance on the right is All Saints Church, which was built in 1874.

In the present-day photo, the building on the left was once home to George’s Spaghetti House and later True Love Café. After 150 years, All Saints Church is still serving the community and today is known as All Saints Church-Community Centre (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 50)

Between 1981-88/January 1, 2024 - Looking northeast from Victoria St, just south of Gould St, towards Devonian Square at the Toronto Metropolitan University campus in downtown Toronto. Also known as Lake Devo, the square features a large reflecting pool which transforms into an ice skating rink during the cooler months. Large Precambrian boulders from the Muskoka region's Canadian Shield are scattered in and around the pool. Devonian Square's name originates from the foundation that donated the project's principal funds. The building in the background on the right is TMU's School of Image Arts, and the other building is Kerr Hall
Between 1981-88/January 1, 2024 – Looking northeast from Victoria St, just south of Gould St, towards Devonian Square at the Toronto Metropolitan University campus in downtown Toronto.

Also known as Lake Devo, the square features a large reflecting pool which transforms into an ice skating rink during the cooler months. Large Precambrian boulders from the Muskoka region’s Canadian Shield are scattered in and around the pool. Devonian Square’s name originates from the foundation that donated the project’s principal funds.

The building in the background on the right is TMU’s School of Image Arts, and the other building is Kerr Hall (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 495b, Item 28)

August 29, 1916/January 1, 2024 – Looking north up Yonge St from Birch Ave in the Summerhill neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows streetcar tracks being laid on Yonge St. The photo also shows The Rosedale Hotel on the right, which once stood at the northeast corner of Yonge St and Shaftesbury Ave. It later became the Northgate Hotel/Ports of Call. The hotel has since been torn down and replaced by the Archdiocese of Toronto building
August 29, 1916/January 1, 2024 – Looking north up Yonge St from Birch Ave in the Summerhill neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows streetcar tracks being laid on Yonge St. The photo also shows The Rosedale Hotel on the right, which once stood at the northeast corner of Yonge St and Shaftesbury Ave. It later became the Northgate Hotel/Ports of Call. The hotel has since been torn down and replaced by the Archdiocese of Toronto building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 489)

Circa 1928/2024 - Looking west along Dundas St W from Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The archive photo shows the Hotel Ford, the tall building in the distance. Built in 1927/28, during its first year, Hotel Ford was the best hotel in the city until the Royal York Hotel opened. Hotel Ford was torn down in 1974. Notice Roger's store in the left foreground of the present-day photo. The building was constructed in 1949 for the Bank of Nova Scotia and received heritage status from the city in 2007
Circa 1928/2024 – Looking west along Dundas St W from Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto.

The archive photo shows the Hotel Ford, the tall building in the distance. Built in 1927/28, during its first year, Hotel Ford was the best hotel in the city until the Royal York Hotel opened. Hotel Ford was torn down in 1974.

Notice Roger’s store in the left foreground of the present-day photo. The building was constructed in 1949 for the Bank of Nova Scotia and received heritage status from the city in 2007 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 7304)

Circa 1910/February 25, 2024 – Looking east along King St E from Yonge St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

In the centre-right of the photos, notice the King Edward Hotel. Built in 1903 for $3 million, the hotel was named after King Edward VII (1841-1910) and designed by architects EJ Lennox of Toronto and Henry Ives Cobb of Chicago in the Edwardian Baroque/Late Victorian style.

The grand hotel was saved from demolition and added to the city’s heritage register in the 1970s. Over the years, the hotel has undergone renovations, with the most recent one taking place from 2013-2015, when it was relaunched as the Omni King Edward Hotel
Circa 1910/February 25, 2024 – Looking east along King St E from Yonge St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

In the centre-right of the photos, notice the King Edward Hotel. Built in 1903 for $3 million, the hotel was named after King Edward VII (1841-1910) and designed by architects EJ Lennox of Toronto and Henry Ives Cobb of Chicago in the Edwardian Baroque/Late Victorian style.

The grand hotel was saved from demolition and added to the city’s heritage register in the 1970s. Over the years, the hotel has undergone renovations, with the most recent one taking place from 2013-2015, when it was relaunched as the Omni King Edward Hotel (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 7345)

Between 1980 and 90s/2023 - Looking southwest towards the corner of King St E and Berkeley St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The four-storey, red brick Eclectic Victorian-style structure was constructed in 1891/92 as the offices and halls for merchants John and George Reid of the Reid Lumber Company. Its angled entrance features a decorative cast iron column. The prominent corner building was listed on Heritage Toronto’s initial induction list in 1973 and today houses italinteriors. The glass structure behind the Reid Lumber Company building in the present-day photo is the Globe and Mail Centre
Between 1980 and 90s/2023 – Looking southwest towards the corner of King St E and Berkeley St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

The four-storey, red brick Eclectic Victorian-style structure was constructed in 1891/92 as the offices and halls for merchants John and George Reid of the Reid Lumber Company. Its angled entrance features a decorative cast iron column. The prominent corner building was listed on Heritage Toronto’s initial induction list in 1973 and today houses italinteriors.

The glass structure behind the Reid Lumber Company building in the present-day photo is the Globe and Mail Centre (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 52, ID 27)

April 24, 1923/2023 - Looking northeast at the intersection of Roncesvalles Ave, Queen St W, King St W and The Queensway in the Parkdale neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows TTC streetcar tracks being laid at the intersection. The photo was captured by the TTC's official photographer, Alfred Pearson, who documented the Commission's buildings, rolling stock, and projects from 1922 until 1944
April 24, 1923/2023 – Looking northeast at the intersection of Roncesvalles Ave, Queen St W, King St W and The Queensway in the Parkdale neighbourhood of Toronto.

The archive photo shows TTC streetcar tracks being laid at the intersection. The photo was captured by the TTC’s official photographer, Alfred Pearson, who documented the Commission’s buildings, rolling stock, and projects from 1922 until 1944 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 2060)

1909/February 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Sherbourne St in the Garden District of Toronto. The archive photo shows when the corner was the site of The Belmont, a private boarding house torn down circa 1911. The building shown in the present-day photo was once home to George's Spaghetti House and later True Love Café
1909/February 2024 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Sherbourne St in the Garden District of Toronto. The archive photo shows when the corner was the site of The Belmont, a private boarding house torn down circa 1911. The building shown in the present-day photo was once home to George’s Spaghetti House and later True Love Café (Toronto Public Library R-3674)

June 11, 1941/2023 – Looking northwest from the intersection of The Queensway, Roncesvalles Ave, Queen St W and King St W in Toronto's Sunnyside and Parkdale neighbourhoods. In the archive photo on the left is the TTC Roncesvalles Carhouse, a storage and maintenance facility for streetcars. Next to it is the Sunnyside Bus Terminal, which opened in the mid-1930s. Grey Coach Bus Lines operated out of the terminal; the building also featured the B & G Coffee Shop Milk Bar. On the right in the vintage photo is the Edgewater Hotel, which opened in 1939. In later years, the hotel became the Royal Princess, a Days Inn, and then Howard Johnson. Today, the former bus terminal is a McDonald's restaurant, and since 2020, the hotel has been Hotel Shelter in partnership with the City of Toronto
June 11, 1941/2023 – Looking northwest from the intersection of The Queensway, Roncesvalles Ave, Queen St W and King St W in Toronto’s Sunnyside and Parkdale neighbourhoods.

In the archive photo on the left is the TTC Roncesvalles Carhouse, a storage and maintenance facility for streetcars. Next to it is the Sunnyside Bus Terminal, which opened in the mid-1930s. Grey Coach Bus Lines operated out of the terminal; the building also featured the B & G Coffee Shop Milk Bar. On the right in the vintage photo is the Edgewater Hotel, which opened in 1939. In later years, the hotel became the Royal Princess, a Days Inn, and then Howard Johnson.

Today, the former bus terminal is a McDonald’s restaurant, and since 2020, the hotel has been Hotel Shelter in partnership with the City of Toronto (Library and Archives Canada PA-054693)

1972/February 18, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Dundas St E and Sherbourne St in the Garden District of Toronto
1972/February 18, 2024 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Dundas St E and Sherbourne St in the Garden District of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 50, Item 9)

Between 1981-88/January 1, 2024 - Looking southwest from Gould St, just east of Victoria St, towards the Devonian Square's reflecting pool/ice skating rink at the Toronto Metropolitan University campus in downtown Toronto.

Devonian Square, a part of what was known then as Ryerson Community Park, opened on October 13, 1978. Massive Precambrian boulders from the Muskoka region's Canadian Shield are strewn about the "Lake Devo" pool. The square's name originates from The Devonian Foundation of Calgary, which donated the principal funds for the project.

Also, notice the CN Tower visible in the background of the archive photo
Between 1981-88/January 1, 2024 – Looking southwest from Gould St, just east of Victoria St, towards the Devonian Square‘s reflecting pool/ice skating rink at the Toronto Metropolitan University campus in downtown Toronto.

Devonian Square, a part of what was known then as Ryerson Community Park, opened on October 13, 1978. Massive Precambrian boulders from the Muskoka region’s Canadian Shield are strewn about the “Lake Devo” pool. The square’s name originates from The Devonian Foundation of Calgary, which donated the principal funds for the project.

Also, notice the CN Tower visible in the background of the archive photo (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 495b, Item 14)

1936/January 27, 2024 – The Robert Burns monument is in Toronto's Allan Gardens. The archive photo shows the statue in its original location in the park, at the southwest corner of Carlton St and Sherbourne St. In 1956, it was moved to its present-day location in the park (about 100 m south) on the Sherbourne St side, about midway between Gerrard St E and Carlton St.

Robert Burns was a Scottish poet and lyricist widely regarded as Scotland's national poet. He was born on January 25, 1759, and died on July 21, 1796, at the age of 37. The archive photo was taken when the Robert Burns monument was unveiled in 1902. The sculpture was created by Edinburgh artist David Watson Stevenson
1936/January 27, 2024 – The Robert Burns monument is in Toronto’s Allan Gardens. The archive photo shows the statue in its original location in the park, at the southwest corner of Carlton St and Sherbourne St. In 1956, it was moved to its present-day location in the park (about 100 m south) on the Sherbourne St side, about midway between Gerrard St E and Carlton St.

Robert Burns was a Scottish poet and lyricist widely regarded as Scotland’s national poet. He was born on January 25, 1759, and died on July 21, 1796, at the age of 37. The archive photo was taken when the Robert Burns monument was unveiled in 1902. The sculpture was created by Edinburgh artist David Watson Stevenson (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 97)

1972/February 18, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Sherbourne St in the Garden District of Toronto
1972/February 18, 2024 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Dundas St E and Sherbourne St in the Garden District of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 50, Item 11)

September 27, 1973/February 10, 2024 – Looking northeast along Lombard St, west of Jarvis St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. 

The archive photo shows the Lombard Street City Morgue in the left foreground, which was in use from 1908 until 1975. Visible in the background is the top of the former Fire Hall No. 5's tower (with the Canadian Flag). 

There are plans to construct a mixed-use development called 100 Lombard at the site. As per the proposal, the old morgue building would be relocated about 35 m east and positioned directly next to the former Fire Hall No. 5 at 110 Lombard St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 61, Item 56)
September 27, 1973/February 10, 2024 – Looking northeast along Lombard St, west of Jarvis St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

The archive photo shows the Lombard Street City Morgue in the left foreground, which was in use from 1908 until 1975. Visible in the background is the top of the former Fire Hall No. 5’s tower (with the Canadian Flag).

There are plans to construct a mixed-use development called 100 Lombard at the site. As per the proposal, the old morgue building would be relocated about 35 m east and positioned directly next to the former Fire Hall No. 5 at 110 Lombard St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 61, Item 56)

May 1971/January 21, 2024 - Looking southeast towards the front of Union Station on Front St W between Bay St and York St in downtown Toronto.

Behind the 22 limestone columns are the principal entrances to Union Station. The Beaux-Arts-style building became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1975. 

The archive photo shows the sign for the York Pioneer Tavern on the right. The 80-seat lounge opened in 1960, and the following year, it became the first railway station lounge in Ontario to serve liquor
May 1971/January 21, 2024 – Looking southeast towards the front of Union Station on Front St W between Bay St and York St in downtown Toronto.

Behind the 22 limestone columns are the principal entrances to Union Station. The Beaux-Arts-style building became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1975.

The archive photo shows the sign for the York Pioneer Tavern on the right. The 80-seat lounge opened in 1960, and the following year, it became the first railway station lounge in Ontario to serve liquor (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 2, ID 117)

1937/January 21, 2024 – Looking west across the Prince Edward Viaduct from Danforth Ave and Broadview Ave intersection in Toronto’s North Riverdale neighbourhood. Commonly known as the Bloor Viaduct, it connects Bloor St E with Danforth Ave. The bridge was constructed between 1915 and 1918 and named after Prince Edward, who later became King Edward VIII
1937/January 21, 2024 – Looking west across the Prince Edward Viaduct from Danforth Ave and Broadview Ave intersection in Toronto’s North Riverdale neighbourhood.

Commonly known as the Bloor Viaduct, it connects Bloor St E with Danforth Ave. The bridge was constructed between 1915 and 1918 and named after Prince Edward, who later became King Edward VIII (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 4997)

December 10, 1920/January 1, 2024 - Looking west on Bloor St W from Christie St in the Christie Pits and Seaton Village neighbourhoods of Toronto
December 10, 1920/January 1, 2024 – Looking west on Bloor St W from Christie St in the Christie Pits and Seaton Village neighbourhoods of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 909)

1873/1898 – Looking west at Front St E, Church St and Wellington St E in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood. The upper archive photo shows The Coffin Block. It was built in the 1830s, designed by architect John Ewart and became known as The Coffin Block due to its resemblance to a coffin. George Gooderham of Gooderham & Worts Limited wanted to move the company’s corporate head office from the liquor distillery site at Trinity St and Mill St to what was then the financial centre of Toronto, in the St Lawrence area. So, in 1891, The Coffin Block was torn down to make way for the Gooderham Building, designed by architect David Roberts Jr and completed in 1892. At the time, it was the most expensive office building in the city, and today, it is one of Toronto's most iconic and photographed structures
1873/1898 – Looking west at Front St E, Church St and Wellington St E in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood.

The upper archive photo shows The Coffin Block. It was built in the 1830s, designed by architect John Ewart and became known as The Coffin Block due to its resemblance to a coffin.

George Gooderham of Gooderham & Worts Limited wanted to move the company’s corporate head office from the liquor distillery site at Trinity St and Mill St to what was then the financial centre of Toronto, in the St Lawrence area. So, in 1891, The Coffin Block was torn down to make way for the Gooderham Building, designed by architect David Roberts Jr and completed in 1892. At the time, it was the most expensive office building in the city, and today, it is one of Toronto’s most iconic and photographed structures (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 7335 & Toronto Public Library R-6249)

1983/January 1, 2024 – Looking north towards the intersection of Yonge St and Dundas St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The archive photo shows a street scene with ice cream vendors on the corner. In the left background of the vintage photo, also notice Scotiabank, which is today home to a Rogers store. On the right, Mr Submarine, Pinball Games and Biltmore Theatre are now the site of The Tenor retail, entertainment and office complex
1983/January 1, 2024 – Looking north towards the intersection of Yonge St and Dundas St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The archive photo shows a street scene with ice cream vendors on the corner. In the left background of the vintage photo, also notice Scotiabank, which is today home to a Rogers store. On the right, Mr Submarine, Pinball Games and Biltmore Theatre are now the site of The Tenor retail, entertainment and office complex (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 620, Item 583)

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