Past & Present – Part 43

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Circa 1920/2023 – Looking northwest towards Oakwood Collegiate Institute at 991 St Clair Ave W and Oakwood Ave, in the St. Clair West Village of Toronto. Built in 1911/12 and initially known as Oakwood High School, the building was designed by architect Franklin Belfry. Oakwood was the first high school in the city to offer courses in “household science” and “manual training”
Circa 1920/2023 – Looking northwest towards Oakwood Collegiate Institute at 991 St Clair Ave W and Oakwood Ave, in the St. Clair West Village of Toronto. Built in 1911/12 and initially known as Oakwood High School, the building was designed by architect Franklin Belfry. Oakwood was the first high school in the city to offer courses in “household science” and “manual training” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, File 1057, Item 240)

March 3, 1928/2023 – Looking east along Front St W from west of Simcoe St, in downtown Toronto. The archive photo shows the Daly House in the right foreground and the city’s previous Union Station next to it in the centre. Today the southeast corner of Lower Simcoe St and Front St W is home to the heritage-designated Canadian National Express Building
March 3, 1928/2023 – Looking east along Front St W from west of Simcoe St, in downtown Toronto. The archive photo shows the Daly House in the right foreground and the city’s previous Union Station next to it in the centre. Today the southeast corner of Lower Simcoe St and Front St W is home to the heritage-designated Canadian National Express Building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 5690)

December 3, 1949/January 7, 2023 – Looking north up Yonge St from Queen St in Toronto's Downtown Yonge area
December 3, 1949/January 7, 2023 – Looking north up Yonge St from Queen St in Toronto’s Downtown Yonge area (City of Toronto Archives, Series 381, File 19, ID 6288-1)

April 23, 1923/April 23, 2023 – Looking northwest from the intersection of The Queensway, Roncesvalles Ave, Queen St W and King St W in the Sunnyside and Parkdale neighbourhoods of Toronto. The archive photo shows when the corner was home to the Sunnyside Restaurant. By the 1930s, the TTC Car House, the Sunnyside Bus Terminal with B & G Coffee Shop Milk Bar (today a McDonald's restaurant) and the Edgewater Hotel (presently Hotel Shelter) had been constructed at the corner. It's interesting to see how much has changed in 100 years
April 23, 1923/April 23, 2023 – Looking northwest from the intersection of The Queensway, Roncesvalles Ave, Queen St W and King St W in the Sunnyside and Parkdale neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The archive photo shows when the corner was home to the Sunnyside Restaurant. By the 1930s, the TTC Car House, the Sunnyside Bus Terminal with B & G Coffee Shop Milk Bar (today a McDonald’s restaurant) and the Edgewater Hotel (presently Hotel Shelter) had been constructed at the corner. It’s interesting to see how much has changed in 100 years (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 1979)

1975/2023 – Looking northeast at Berkeley St and King St E in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto. The building at the corner was constructed in 1859 and was originally the Garibaldi House, which operated as a tavern. Other businesses that later occupied the structure included a druggist and restaurant and, today, a graphic design agency. The row of grey stucco houses from 55 to 79 Berkeley St were built in 1871/72 for John Irwin. They were simple cottages that reflected the working-class character of the neighbourhood in the late 19th century. Early occupants of the homes would have included labourers, distillers and machinists. All of the mentioned properties have been listed on the city’s heritage register since 1973
1975/2023 – Looking northeast at Berkeley St and King St E in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto. The building at the corner was constructed in 1859 and was originally the Garibaldi House, which operated as a tavern. Other businesses that later occupied the structure included a druggist and restaurant and, today, a graphic design agency.

The row of grey stucco houses from 55 to 79 Berkeley St were built in 1871/72 for John Irwin. They were simple cottages that reflected the working-class character of the neighbourhood in the late 19th century. Early occupants of the homes would have included labourers, distillers and machinists. All of the mentioned properties have been listed on the city’s heritage register since 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 3, ID 40)

December 1954/2023 – Looking northwest towards The Broadview Hotel at Broadview Ave and Queen St E in the Riverside neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1891/92 as Dingman’s Hall, the Romanesque Revival-style building initially housed shops, offices and assembly halls before being converted into a hotel in 1907/08. The structure was added to the city's heritage register in 1975. Notice the railing in the left foreground of the archive photo. It surrounded a stairway that led to the underground public lavatory that was at the corner from 1910 until 1981
December 1954/2023 – Looking northwest towards The Broadview Hotel at Broadview Ave and Queen St E in the Riverside neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1891/92 as Dingman’s Hall, the Romanesque Revival-style building initially housed shops, offices and assembly halls before being converted into a hotel in 1907/08. The structure was added to the city’s heritage register in 1975.

Notice the railing in the left foreground of the archive photo. It surrounded a stairway that led to the underground public lavatory that was at the corner from 1910 until 1981 (Toronto Public Library R-5860)

May 8, 1914/April 23, 2023 – Looking north up Ryerson Ave from Queen St W, in the Alexandra Park neighbourhood of Toronto
May 8, 1914/April 23, 2023 – Looking north up Ryerson Ave from Queen St W, in the Alexandra Park neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 3, Item 147)

July 21, 1982/2023 – Looking southwest towards The Broadview Hotel at Broadview Ave and Queen St E in the Riverside neighbourhood of Toronto. Originally called Dingman’s Hall, the building was constructed in 1891/92 for Archibald W Dingman. In its early years, along with its upper assembly halls, Dingman’s Hall was also home to a Canadian Bank of Commerce branch, a cigar maker, barristers, real estate brokers, dentists, and many social clubs. In 1907/08, the building was converted and renamed The Broadview Hotel. The property had a few name changes throughout the years, including the Lincoln Hotel, the Broadview House Hotel, and the New Broadview Hotel. In recent decades, it was also home to Jilly’s. In 2014, the hotel was sold. The historic building underwent a major restoration under new ownership and reopened as The Broadview Hotel in 2017
July 21, 1982/2023 – Looking southwest towards The Broadview Hotel at Broadview Ave and Queen St E in the Riverside neighbourhood of Toronto.

Originally called Dingman’s Hall, the building was constructed in 1891/92 for Archibald W Dingman. In its early years, along with its upper assembly halls, Dingman’s Hall was also home to a Canadian Bank of Commerce branch, a cigar maker, barristers, real estate brokers, dentists, and many social clubs.

In 1907/08, the building was converted and renamed The Broadview Hotel. The property had a few name changes throughout the years, including the Lincoln Hotel, the Broadview House Hotel, and the New Broadview Hotel. In recent decades, it was also home to Jilly’s. In 2014, the hotel was sold. The historic building underwent a major restoration under new ownership and reopened as The Broadview Hotel in 2017 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 7, Item 146)

April 1953/2023 - Looking northeast along King St E towards Berkeley St in Toronto's Old Town neighbourhood. The three-storey brick Georgian-style rowhouses at the corner were constructed for Charles Coxwell Small in 1845. In 1879, the rowhouse directly at the corner was extended to the sidewalk and occupied by Greenshield's Grocery until 1956. It was home to the Nienkämper/Klaus showroom in recent decades. The two-storey building in the background on the right is the historic Garibaldi House. It was built in 1859 and was originally a tavern and inn. All of the mentioned buildings have been listed on the city’s heritage register since 1973
April 1953/2023 – Looking northeast along King St E towards Berkeley St in Toronto’s Old Town neighbourhood.

The three-storey brick Georgian-style rowhouses at the corner were constructed for Charles Coxwell Small in 1845. In 1879, the rowhouse directly at the corner was extended to the sidewalk and occupied by Greenshield’s Grocery until 1956. It was home to the Nienkämper/Klaus showroom in recent decades.

The two-storey building in the background on the right is the historic Garibaldi House. It was built in 1859 and was originally a tavern and inn. All of the mentioned buildings have been listed on the city’s heritage register since 1973 (Toronto Public Library R-2832)

May 30, 1974/2023 – Looking southwest along Yonge St from Yorkville Ave in Toronto's Yorkville neighbourhood
May 30, 1974/2023 – Looking southwest along Yonge St from Yorkville Ave in Toronto’s Yorkville neighbourhood (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 1, Item 131)

September 18, 1923/December 23, 2023 – Looking northeast toward Dundas St E and George St in Toronto's Garden District. The archive photo shows streetcar track construction in front of the Wilton Court Private Hotel, which today is Filmores Hotel. The building was originally called the Wilton Court Apartments and was constructed in the mid-1910s. Over the years, the property was known by different names, such as Westover Hotel and Stage 212, before finally becoming Filmores Hotel in the 1980s. There are plans for a mixed-use tower at the corner, including incorporating Filmores facade into the structure. The small curve on Dundas St E, from George St to Sherbourne St, was once known as Wilton Crescent, which explains the origin of the property's early names
September 18, 1923/December 23, 2023 – Looking northeast toward Dundas St E and George St in Toronto’s Garden District.

The archive photo shows streetcar track construction in front of the Wilton Court Private Hotel, which today is Filmores Hotel. The building was originally called the Wilton Court Apartments and was constructed in the mid-1910s. Over the years, the property was known by different names, such as Westover Hotel and Stage 212, before finally becoming Filmores Hotel in the 1980s. There are plans for a mixed-use tower at the corner, including incorporating Filmores facade into the structure.

The small curve on Dundas St E, from George St to Sherbourne St, was once known as Wilton Crescent, which explains the origin of the property’s early names (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 2538)

1873/April 2023 - Looking west at Front St E, Church St and Wellington St E in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood. In the centre of the archive photo is The Coffin Block. It was built in the 1830s, designed by architect John Ewart and became known as The Coffin Block due to its resemblance to a coffin. The Coffin Block was torn down to make way for the Gooderham Building, designed by architect David Roberts Jr and completed in 1892. Today, the Gooderham Building is one of the city's most recognized and photographed structures
1873/April 2023 – Looking west at Front St E, Church St and Wellington St E in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood. In the centre of the archive photo is The Coffin Block. It was built in the 1830s, designed by architect John Ewart and became known as The Coffin Block due to its resemblance to a coffin. The Coffin Block was torn down to make way for the Gooderham Building, designed by architect David Roberts Jr and completed in 1892. Today, the Gooderham Building is one of the city’s most recognized and photographed structures (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 7335)

1972/2023 - Looking towards the northwest corner of King St E and Berkeley St, in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. The Georgian-style rowhouses at the corner were constructed in 1845 for Charles Coxwell Small. In 1879, the corner rowhouse was extended to the sidewalk and was occupied by Greenshield's Grocery until 1956. In recent decades, it was home to the Nienkämper/Klaus showroom (which has since moved a few doors west). The two rowhouses received heritage designation from the city in 1973. In the right background, also notice the building with the tower. It was originally Berkeley Street Fire Hall No. 4 and, since 1972, has been the Alumnae Theatre
1972/2023 – Looking towards the northwest corner of King St E and Berkeley St, in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto.

The Georgian-style rowhouses at the corner were constructed in 1845 for Charles Coxwell Small. In 1879, the corner rowhouse was extended to the sidewalk and was occupied by Greenshield’s Grocery until 1956. In recent decades, it was home to the Nienkämper/Klaus showroom (which has since moved a few doors west). The two rowhouses received heritage designation from the city in 1973.

In the right background, also notice the building with the tower. It was originally Berkeley Street Fire Hall No. 4 and, since 1972, has been the Alumnae Theatre (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 21, Item 18)

Circa 1980/December 2023 – Looking west towards Yonge St from Gould St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The archive photo shows Sam the Record Man's tape store and the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce on the right, with Fran's Restaurant & the Upper Deck and Funland across the street. The northeast corner of Yonge St and Gould St has gone through some changes over the years, and today, it’s home to Toronto Metropolitan University's (formerly Ryerson) Sheldon & Tracy Levy Student Learning Centre
Circa 1980/December 2023 – Looking west towards Yonge St from Gould St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The archive photo shows Sam the Record Man’s tape store and the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce on the right, with Fran’s Restaurant & the Upper Deck and Funland across the street.

The northeast corner of Yonge St and Gould St has gone through some changes over the years, and today, it’s home to Toronto Metropolitan University’s (formerly Ryerson) Sheldon & Tracy Levy Student Learning Centre (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 19, Item 28)

1907/2023 - Looking south down Spadina Rd from north of Davenport Rd in the Casa Loma and Dupont by the Castle neighbourhoods of Toronto. The present-day photo was taken from the Baldwin Steps. The staircase was named after William Warren Baldwin, who emigrated to Canada from Ireland in 1799. In 1818, Baldwin built a home on the land near the top of today’s Baldwin Steps and called it Spadina House. When the house was named, it was pronounced “Spadeena,” which comes from the Ojibwe word “ishpadinaa.” It means high hill or ridge
1907/2023 – Looking south down Spadina Rd from north of Davenport Rd in the Casa Loma and Dupont by the Castle neighbourhoods of Toronto. The present-day photo was taken from the Baldwin Steps. The staircase was named after William Warren Baldwin, who emigrated to Canada from Ireland in 1799. In 1818, Baldwin built a home on the land near the top of today’s Baldwin Steps and called it Spadina House. When the house was named, it was pronounced “Spadeena,” which comes from the Ojibwe word “ishpadinaa.” It means high hill or ridge (Toronto Public Library R-1462)

Circa 1924/2023 – Jarvis Collegiate Institute is located at the southeast corner of Jarvis St‬ and Wellesley St E in Toronto’s Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. Construction began on the school in 1922. It was designed in the Collegiate Gothic style by Charles Dyson, the Chief Architect for the Toronto Board of Education. On opening day, April 28, 1924, about 800 students walked 450 m north from the old school, once at 355-365 Jarvis St, to the present-day school. A few notable grads from Jarvis CI include Roy Thomson, Conn Smythe, Mayor Olivia Chow, Chris Makepeace and Aubrey Drake Graham. Jarvis Collegiate Institute was founded as the Home District Grammar School in 1807. The school began with five students in a one-storey building attached to the headmaster’s home, which once stood at the southeast corner of King St E and George St
Circa 1924/2023 – Jarvis Collegiate Institute is located at the southeast corner of Jarvis St‬ and Wellesley St E in Toronto’s Upper Jarvis neighbourhood.

Construction began on the school in 1922. It was designed in the Collegiate Gothic style by Charles Dyson, the Chief Architect for the Toronto Board of Education. On opening day, April 28, 1924, about 800 students walked 450 m north from the old school, once at 355-365 Jarvis St, to the present-day school. A few notable grads from Jarvis CI include Roy Thomson, Conn Smythe, Mayor Olivia Chow, Chris Makepeace and Aubrey Drake Graham.

Jarvis Collegiate Institute was founded as the Home District Grammar School in 1807. The school began with five students in a one-storey building attached to the headmaster’s home, which once stood at the southeast corner of King St E and George St (Toronto Public Library R-5694)

2021/October 6, 2023 – Looking northeast towards the former Palace Arms Hotel and Palace Tavern at 950 King St W and Strachan Ave, in the King West Village of Toronto. Built in 1890, architect Frederick Henry Herbert designed the building in the Romanesque Revival style. The building received heritage status from the city in 1984. There are plans to incorporate the building’s historic façade into a mixed-use development
2021/October 6, 2023 – Looking northeast towards the former Palace Arms Hotel and Palace Tavern at 950 King St W and Strachan Ave, in the King West Village of Toronto. Built in 1890, architect Frederick Henry Herbert designed the building in the Romanesque Revival style. The building received heritage status from the city in 1984. There are plans to incorporate the building’s historic façade into a mixed-use development

2019/2022 - The Gelber Bros. ghost sign is located at 225 Richmond St W and Duncan St in Toronto's downtown core. The building was once home to a textile company founded by Moses and Louis Gelber in the early 1900s. The ghost sign says, "Gelber Bros. Limited Wholesale Woolens and Dress Goods" and was restored in late 2020
2019/2022 – The Gelber Bros. ghost sign is located at 225 Richmond St W and Duncan St in Toronto’s downtown core. The building was once home to a textile company founded by Moses and Louis Gelber in the early 1900s. The ghost sign says, “Gelber Bros. Limited Wholesale Woolens and Dress Goods” and was restored in late 2020

April 23, 1923/June 11, 1941 - Looking northwest from the intersection of The Queensway, Roncesvalles Ave, Queen St W and King St W in the Sunnyside and Parkdale neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The 1923 archive photo shows when the corner was home to the Sunnyside Restaurant. By the 1941 archive photo, the TTC Car House, the Sunnyside Bus Terminal with B & G Coffee Shop Milk Bar (today a McDonald's restaurant) and the Edgewater Hotel (presently Hotel Shelter) had been constructed at the corner
April 23, 1923/June 11, 1941 – Looking northwest from the intersection of The Queensway, Roncesvalles Ave, Queen St W and King St W in the Sunnyside and Parkdale neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The 1923 archive photo shows when the corner was home to the Sunnyside Restaurant. By the 1941 archive photo, the TTC Car House, the Sunnyside Bus Terminal with B & G Coffee Shop Milk Bar (today a McDonald’s restaurant) and the Edgewater Hotel (presently Hotel Shelter) had been constructed at the corner (Library and Archives Canada PA-054693 & City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 1979)

2023/1972 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Bay St and Gerrard St W in downtown Toronto. The semi-detached house at 70 Gerrard St W was built in 1867 by builder James Maguire and received heritage status from the city in 1974. Today, it’s home to Tim Horton’s
2023/1972 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Bay St and Gerrard St W in downtown Toronto. The semi-detached house at 70 Gerrard St W was built in 1867 by builder James Maguire and received heritage status from the city in 1974. Today, it’s home to Tim Horton’s (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 60, Item 4)

April 7, 1923/2023 – Looking east towards the intersection of Roncesvalles Ave, Queen St W, The Queensway and King St W, in the Sunnyside and Parkdale neighbourhoods of Toronto. 

A few points of interest in both photos are the building currently home to Burrito Boys, built in 1910. Architect Frank Darling designed it for the Imperial Bank and, in 2020, was listed on the city's heritage register as part of the Parkdale Main Street Heritage Conservation District. 

Also, notice the building on the right. It was constructed circa 1885 and originally Scholes Hotel, later the Ocean House. Today, it's used for residential and commercial purposes and was given heritage status in 1989 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 1978)
April 7, 1923/2023 – Looking east towards the intersection of Roncesvalles Ave, Queen St W, The Queensway and King St W, in the Sunnyside and Parkdale neighbourhoods of Toronto.

A few points of interest in both photos are the building currently home to Burrito Boys, built in 1910. Architect Frank Darling designed it for the Imperial Bank and, in 2020, was listed on the city’s heritage register as part of the Parkdale Main Street Heritage Conservation District.

Also, notice the building on the right. It was constructed circa 1885 and originally Scholes Hotel, later the Ocean House. Today, it’s used for residential and commercial purposes and was given heritage status in 1989 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 1978)

1965/2023 – Looking northwest on Bay St from Dundas St W in downtown Toronto. Notice the McKnight Building in the foreground. It was constructed in the mid-1920s and designed by architects Smith & Everett. Early tenants of the five-storey commercial building included dentists, fashion businesses, a music instructor, a tobacco shop and a post office substation. Additionally, it's worth noting that one of the building's architects, Sandford Fleming Smith, was the grandson of Sir Sandford Fleming, the Scottish-Canadian engineer, scientist, and inventor. The two-storey structure next to the McKnight Building was the Toronto Coach Terminal. The Art-Deco-style building was designed by architect Charles B Dolphin and opened in 1931. After 90 years in operation, the bus terminal closed its doors in 2021. However, there are plans in place to preserve and adaptively reuse this heritage-designated building
1965/2023 – Looking northwest on Bay St from Dundas St W in downtown Toronto.

Notice the McKnight Building in the foreground. It was constructed in the mid-1920s and designed by architects Smith & Everett. Early tenants of the five-storey commercial building included dentists, fashion businesses, a music instructor, a tobacco shop and a post office substation. Additionally, it’s worth noting that one of the building’s architects, Sandford Fleming Smith, was the grandson of Sir Sandford Fleming, the Scottish-Canadian engineer, scientist, and inventor.

The two-storey structure next to the McKnight Building was the Toronto Coach Terminal. The Art-Deco-style building was designed by architect Charles B Dolphin and opened in 1931. After 90 years in operation, the bus terminal closed its doors in 2021. However, there are plans in place to preserve and adaptively reuse this heritage-designated building (City of Toronto Archives, Series 648, File 168, ID 1)

2021/2024 – Looking towards the northeast corner of Leader Lane and Colborne St in Toronto's Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood. From 1966 to 2021, the building was the location of Tom Jones Steak House; however, the brick structure has a long history, with many portions dating back to the 1800s. According to historical maps and directories, the corner was initially the site of a printing shop. In the late 1870s, the building was occupied by Foster James, who operated a mathematical instruments business. By 1884, Grand & Toy opened their first stationary store and later added a two-storey wing on the structure's north side. In the mid-1890s, the building became the Hub Hotel, then housed jewel and jewel/watch display case businesses. From the late 1910s until about 1964, the property was the site of Smellie & Sons Ltd, a jewellery manufacturer, who added a third storey on the north wing. Today, the heritage-designated property at 17 Leader Lane/40 Colborne St is commercial space. Adjoining the building's north and east sides is 65 King East, an office and retail tower
2021/2024 – Looking towards the northeast corner of Leader Lane and Colborne St in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood.

From 1966 to 2021, the building was the location of Tom Jones Steak House; however, the brick structure has a long history, with many portions dating back to the 1800s.

According to historical maps and directories, the corner was initially the site of a printing shop. In the late 1870s, the building was occupied by Foster James, who operated a mathematical instruments business. By 1884, Grand & Toy opened their first stationary store and later added a two-storey wing on the structure’s north side. In the mid-1890s, the building became the Hub Hotel, then housed jewel and jewel/watch display case businesses. From the late 1910s until about 1964, the property was the site of Smellie & Sons Ltd, a jewellery manufacturer, who added a third storey on the north wing.

Today, the heritage-designated property at 17 Leader Lane/40 Colborne St is commercial space. Adjoining the building’s north and east sides is 65 King East, an office and retail tower

March 20, 1979/2023 - Looking north towards a TTC streetcar passing the intersection of Queen St W and Simcoe St in downtown Toronto.

On the north side of Queen St W is the Campbell House Museum. The late Georgian-era home was built in 1822 by Sir William Campbell and originally located on Adelaide St E, opposite Frederick St. To save the historic house from demolition, it was transported to its present-day location in 1972. 

Directly behind the Campbell House is the monumental Canada Life Building. The Beaux-Arts style landmark was considered a skyscraper when it was completed in 1931. Canada Life, an insurance and wealth management company, still operates from the building today
March 20, 1979/2023 – Looking north towards a TTC streetcar passing the intersection of Queen St W and Simcoe St in downtown Toronto.

On the north side of Queen St W is the Campbell House Museum. The late Georgian-era home was built in 1822 by Sir William Campbell and originally located on Adelaide St E, opposite Frederick St. To save the historic house from demolition, it was transported to its present-day location in 1972.

Directly behind the Campbell House is the monumental Canada Life Building. The Beaux-Arts style landmark was considered a skyscraper when it was completed in 1931. Canada Life, an insurance and wealth management company, still operates from the building today (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 70, Item 9)

1963/November 4, 2023 – Looking southeast towards Casa Loma, located at ‪1 Austin Terrace (bordered by Davenport Rd, Walmer Rd and Spadina Park) in the aptly named Casa Loma neighbourhood of Toronto.

Construction on Casa Loma began in 1910, and by 1913, the Pellatt’s moved into the not-quite-completed castle on the hill. Completed the following year, it took 300 men to build the 200,000-square-foot mansion at the cost of $3.5 million. The archive photo shows Casa Loma at Christmastime
1963/November 4, 2023 – Looking southeast towards Casa Loma, located at ‪1 Austin Terrace (bordered by Davenport Rd, Walmer Rd and Spadina Park) in the aptly named Casa Loma neighbourhood of Toronto.

Construction on Casa Loma began in 1910, and by 1913, the Pellatt’s moved into the not-quite-completed castle on the hill. Completed the following year, it took 300 men to build the 200,000-square-foot mansion at the cost of $3.5 million. The archive photo shows Casa Loma at Christmastime (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1567, Series 648, File 150, Item 1)

1972/2023 - Looking southwest towards a Toronto Hydro Substation at the corner of Adelaide St E and George St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. 

The two-storey industrial building was constructed in the early 1930s and designed by architect Albert Edward Salisbury. Its facade is made of brick and stone and features Art-Deco details. Since 2021, the building has been listed on the city’s heritage register as part of the St Lawrence Neighbourhood Heritage Conservation District. Substations are primarily responsible for converting electricity into different voltages. Notice The Cathedral Church of St James steeple in the distance, on the right
1972/2023 – Looking southwest towards a Toronto Hydro Substation at the corner of Adelaide St E and George St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

The two-storey industrial building was constructed in the early 1930s and designed by architect Albert Edward Salisbury. Its facade is made of brick and stone and features Art-Deco details. Since 2021, the building has been listed on the city’s heritage register as part of the St Lawrence Neighbourhood Heritage Conservation District. Substations are primarily responsible for converting electricity into different voltages. Notice The Cathedral Church of St James steeple in the distance, on the right (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 20, Item 7)

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