Past & Present – Part 41

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November 20, 1924/2023 – Looking north up Roncesvalles Ave, from the intersection of Queen St W, The Queensway and King St W in the Parkdale and Sunnyside neighbourhoods of Toronto. The archive photo shows the northwest corner surrounded by billboards. In the 1930s, the Sunnyside Bus Terminal (today home to McDonald's) and the Edgewater Hotel (presently Hotel Shelter, previously Howard Johnson Inn) were constructed at the site. The two-storey building at the northeast corner was designed by architect Frank Darling for the Imperial Bank in 1910. It's currently a Burrito Boys restaurant
November 20, 1924/2023 – Looking north up Roncesvalles Ave, from the intersection of Queen St W, The Queensway and King St W in the Parkdale and Sunnyside neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The archive photo shows the northwest corner surrounded by billboards. In the 1930s, the Sunnyside Bus Terminal (today home to McDonald’s) and the Edgewater Hotel (presently Hotel Shelter, previously Howard Johnson Inn) were constructed at the site.

The two-storey building at the northeast corner was designed by architect Frank Darling for the Imperial Bank in 1910. It’s currently a Burrito Boys restaurant (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 3531)

1972/2020 – Looking northeast towards Tom Jones Steak House at the corner of Leader Lane and Colborne St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The brick building has a long history, with many portions dating back to the 1800s. According to historical maps and directories, the corner was initially the site of a printing shop. Over the years, the building has been occupied by various businesses, including a mathematical instruments shop, a stationary store, a hotel, and a jewellery manufacturer. It became the Tom Jones Steak House in 1966 and remained so for over 50 years, closing in 2021. Today, the heritage-designated property at 17 Leader Lane/40 Colborne St is commercial space. The steeple in the background is The Cathedral Church of St James
1972/2020 – Looking northeast towards Tom Jones Steak House at the corner of Leader Lane and Colborne St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

The brick building has a long history, with many portions dating back to the 1800s. According to historical maps and directories, the corner was initially the site of a printing shop. Over the years, the building has been occupied by various businesses, including a mathematical instruments shop, a stationary store, a hotel, and a jewellery manufacturer.

It became the Tom Jones Steak House in 1966 and remained so for over 50 years, closing in 2021. Today, the heritage-designated property at 17 Leader Lane/40 Colborne St is commercial space. The steeple in the background is The Cathedral Church of St James (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 69, Item 28)
1963/November 4, 2023 – Looking southeast towards Casa Loma, located at ‪1 Austin Terrace in the aptly named Casa Loma neighbourhood of Toronto. Construction began on the magnificent castle in 1910 and was completed in 1913. It stands as a testament to the grandeur and splendour of a bygone era. The castle was built by 300 skilled workers who worked to create a 200,000-square-foot mansion at a cost of $3.5 million. This archive photo showcases Casa Loma at Christmas time
1963/November 4, 2023 – Looking southeast towards Casa Loma, located at ‪1 Austin Terrace in the aptly named Casa Loma neighbourhood of Toronto. Construction began on the magnificent castle in 1910 and was completed in 1913.

It stands as a testament to the grandeur and splendour of a bygone era. The castle was built by 300 skilled workers who worked to create a 200,000-square-foot mansion at a cost of $3.5 million. This archive photo showcases Casa Loma at Christmas time (City of Toronto Archives, Series 648, File 150, ID 5)

1972/2023 – Looking north towards Leader Lane from Wellington St E in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the back of the King Edward Hotel on the left. On the right is a portion of the Hutchinson Building at 36 to 40 Wellington St E, which dates back to 1855. Did you know that Leader Lane was named after The Leader newspaper? It operated from a building once at the southwest corner of King St E and Leader Lane
1972/2023 – Looking north towards Leader Lane from Wellington St E in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the back of the King Edward Hotel on the left. On the right is a portion of the Hutchinson Building at 36 to 40 Wellington St E, which dates back to 1855. Did you know that Leader Lane was named after The Leader newspaper? It operated from a building once at the southwest corner of King St E and Leader Lane (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 69, Item 30)

1972/April 23, 2023 – Looking towards the southeast corner of Colborne St and Leader Lane in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood. The archive photo shows when the building housed El Toro Steak House and Tavern. Today P.J. O'Brien Irish Pub & Restaurant occupies 39 Colborne St. The heritage-designated building was constructed in 1854
1972/April 23, 2023 – Looking towards the southeast corner of Colborne St and Leader Lane in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood. The archive photo shows when the building housed El Toro Steak House and Tavern. Today P.J. O’Brien Irish Pub & Restaurant occupies 39 Colborne St. The heritage-designated building was constructed in 1854 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 481, File 69, Item 25)

June 21, 1918/2022 – The stone sculpture over the main entrance of the Toronto Harbour Commission Building at 60 Harbour St, just west of Bay St in the city’s South Core district. The archive photo shows sculptors working on the entrance’s stone relief work. The majestic building was constructed between 1917 and 1918. When it was completed, the building was surrounded by Lake Ontario on its east, south and west sides, with the beautiful stone sculpture looking out over the harbour
June 21, 1918/2022 – The stone sculpture over the main entrance of the Toronto Harbour Commission Building at 60 Harbour St, just west of Bay St in the city’s South Core district. The archive photo shows sculptors working on the entrance’s stone relief work. The majestic building was constructed between 1917 and 1918. When it was completed, the building was surrounded by Lake Ontario on its east, south and west sides, with the beautiful stone sculpture looking out over the harbour (PortsToronto Archives, Arthur Beales – photographer)

Circa 1950/2021 – Looking west towards the Royal Canadian Military Institute (RCMI) at 426 University Ave, just south of Dundas St W in downtown Toronto. The original building, shown in the archive photo, was home to the RCMI since the early 1900s. Updates were made to the structure throughout the years; however, there were concerns over its declining state. In 2010, the building was demolished. Its historic façade was reconstructed, and along with the Royal Canadian Military Institute and its museum, are now part of a 42-storey residential condo tower
Circa 1950/2021 – Looking west towards the Royal Canadian Military Institute (RCMI) at 426 University Ave, just south of Dundas St W in downtown Toronto. The original building, shown in the archive photo, was home to the RCMI since the early 1900s. Updates were made to the structure throughout the years; however, there were concerns over its declining state. In 2010, the building was demolished. Its historic façade was reconstructed, and along with the Royal Canadian Military Institute and its museum, are now part of a 42-storey residential condo tower (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 380, Item 249)

Circa 1859/2023 – Looking northeast from Church St towards Adelaide St E in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood. The archive photo shows the Episcopalian School in the right foreground and the Mechanics’ Hall in the centre background. The church school building was replaced in 1909 with St James Parish House, which is today part of the St James Cathedral Centre. The Mechanics' Institute was a movement that began in Britain with the purpose of educating adults, particularly in technical subjects. In 1830, this movement expanded to the Town of York, now known as Toronto. The Institute constructed a building in 1854/55, which can be seen in the archive photo, with designs by architects Cumberland & Storm. However, due to a shortage of funds, they had to rent it to the government before finally moving in themselves in 1861. The building was used for lectures and classes, and also housed an extensive reference library and a music hall. In 1882, the Free Libraries Act was passed, and the Mechanics' Institute assets were given to the local government. This led to the formation of the Toronto Public Library, which opened its doors in the building in 1884. The magnificent structure was demolished in 1950, and the site is now occupied by a patio and a mixed-use building
Circa 1859/2023 – Looking northeast from Church St towards Adelaide St E in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood.

The archive photo shows the Episcopalian School in the right foreground and the Mechanics’ Hall in the centre background. The church school building was replaced in 1909 with St James Parish House, which is today part of the St James Cathedral Centre.

The Mechanics’ Institute was a movement that began in Britain with the purpose of educating adults, particularly in technical subjects. In 1830, this movement expanded to the Town of York, now known as Toronto. The Institute constructed a building in 1854/55, which can be seen in the archive photo, with designs by architects Cumberland & Storm. However, due to a shortage of funds, they had to rent it to the government before finally moving in themselves in 1861. The building was used for lectures and classes, and also housed an extensive reference library and a music hall. In 1882, the Free Libraries Act was passed, and the Mechanics’ Institute assets were given to the local government. This led to the formation of the Toronto Public Library, which opened its doors in the building in 1884. The magnificent structure was demolished in 1950, and the site is now occupied by a patio and a mixed-use building (Toronto Public Library E9-272)

1972/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of King St E and George St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The three-storey building directly at the corner was constructed in 1907 for the Sovereign Bank of Canada. Architect George Wallace Gouinlock designed it in the Renaissance Revival style. At the time, the bank was a relatively new institution, founded in 1902. However, by 1908, the Sovereign Bank and its obligations were absorbed by other financial institutions because, according to a local newspaper, “it was too ambitious.” Since then, the building was briefly home to other banks and, later various businesses and offices. The former bank building at 172 King St E received heritage status from the city in 1973
1972/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of King St E and George St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

The three-storey building directly at the corner was constructed in 1907 for the Sovereign Bank of Canada. Architect George Wallace Gouinlock designed it in the Renaissance Revival style. At the time, the bank was a relatively new institution, founded in 1902. However, by 1908, the Sovereign Bank and its obligations were absorbed by other financial institutions because, according to a local newspaper, “it was too ambitious.”

Since then, the building was briefly home to other banks and, later various businesses and offices. The former bank building at 172 King St E received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 20, Item 8)

August 1963/2021 – Looking southwest along King St W from Yonge St in Toronto's Financial District. The archive photo shows Sword Tavern & Restaurant at 7 King St W in the former Coghlan Building. It was constructed in the 1890s and originally housed Michie & Co, a grocery store. In the early 2000s, the building was demolished to make way for One King West Hotel & Residence. On the right side of the photos is the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building, built between 1929 and 1931
August 1963/2021 – Looking southwest along King St W from Yonge St in Toronto’s Financial District. The archive photo shows Sword Tavern & Restaurant at 7 King St W in the former Coghlan Building. It was constructed in the 1890s and originally housed Michie & Co, a grocery store. In the early 2000s, the building was demolished to make way for One King West Hotel & Residence. On the right side of the photos is the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building, built between 1929 and 1931 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 1, ID 105)

June 20, 1979/2023 – Looking northeast at Adelaide St E and George St, in Toronto’s Old Town neighbourhood, towards what was originally the Bank of Upper Canada. The bank was constructed between 1825 and 1827 and was designed by William Warren Baldwin. Its architectural style was influenced by the Neoclassical-style townhouses of late 18th-century London. The portico was added about 1844, and around 1855, an extension was built on the north side. The bank moved in the early 1860s and collapsed in 1866. De La Salle Institute purchased the original building and, in 1871, built an addition on the east side. The city recognized the bank building with heritage status in 1973 as it was the first major financial institution that played a significant role in the development of the Province of Ontario
June 20, 1979/2023 – Looking northeast at Adelaide St E and George St, in Toronto’s Old Town neighbourhood, towards what was originally the Bank of Upper Canada.

The bank was constructed between 1825 and 1827 and was designed by William Warren Baldwin. Its architectural style was influenced by the Neoclassical-style townhouses of late 18th-century London. The portico was added about 1844, and around 1855, an extension was built on the north side. The bank moved in the early 1860s and collapsed in 1866.

De La Salle Institute purchased the original building and, in 1871, built an addition on the east side. The city recognized the bank building with heritage status in 1973 as it was the first major financial institution that played a significant role in the development of the Province of Ontario (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 53, Item 54)

Circa 1911/2023 – The buildings at the northeast corner of King St E and Parliament St in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood originally housed the Aluminum & Crown Stopper Company. Its earlier factory was the building with the arched roofline at 91 Parliament St, on the left side of the photos. It was constructed in 1907/08 and designed by architect Henry Simpson. The company expanded in 1911/12, with architect Frederick Henry Herbert designing the large extension directly at the corner at 334 King St E. Both the buildings were granted heritage status by the city in 1984 and are currently being used as commercial and office spaces
Circa 1911/2023 – The buildings at the northeast corner of King St E and Parliament St in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood originally housed the Aluminum & Crown Stopper Company.

Its earlier factory was the building with the arched roofline at 91 Parliament St, on the left side of the photos. It was constructed in 1907/08 and designed by architect Henry Simpson. The company expanded in 1911/12, with architect Frederick Henry Herbert designing the large extension directly at the corner at 334 King St E. Both the buildings were granted heritage status by the city in 1984 and are currently being used as commercial and office spaces (Toronto Public Library PC_4572)

1972/2023 – Looking northeast towards what was originally the Aluminum & Crown Stopper Company buildings at King St E and Parliament St, in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood. Built in 1911/12, architect Frederick Henry Herbert designed the building directly at the corner at 334 King St E. However, the company’s previous factory building is situated just north of the corner at 91 Parliament St (the building with the arched roofline). It was constructed in 1907/08 and designed by architect Henry Simpson. The buildings received heritage status from the city in 1984 and today are home to commercial and office space
1972/2023 – Looking northeast towards what was originally the Aluminum & Crown Stopper Company buildings at King St E and Parliament St, in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood.

Built in 1911/12, architect Frederick Henry Herbert designed the building directly at the corner at 334 King St E. However, the company’s previous factory building is situated just north of the corner at 91 Parliament St (the building with the arched roofline). It was constructed in 1907/08 and designed by architect Henry Simpson. The buildings received heritage status from the city in 1984 and today are home to commercial and office space (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 30, Item 3)

December 20, 1935/April 2023 – Looking north up Yonge St from Queen St in Toronto's Downtown Yonge area. In the archive photo, the F. W. Woolworth store is visible on the left, while Loew's Theatre, which is now the Elgin and Winter Garden Theatre Centre, can be seen in the distance on the right side
December 20, 1935/April 2023 – Looking north up Yonge St from Queen St in Toronto’s Downtown Yonge area. In the archive photo, the F. W. Woolworth store is visible on the left, while Loew’s Theatre, which is now the Elgin and Winter Garden Theatre Centre, can be seen in the distance on the right side (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 11702)

1988/2023 – Looking east towards King St W and John St intersection in Toronto's Wellington Place neighbourhood and Entertainment District. The building on the left side of the foreground in both photos is the Eclipse Whitewear Building. It was built in 1903, and for more than 50 years, the company manufactured children's and women's underwear in the building. In 1973, the structure was designated as a heritage site due to its significance as one of the earliest warehouses in the area. The two-storey building on the right side of the archive photo was built in the 19th century. Throughout the years, it was home to various businesses, including grocers and restaurants. In the late 1980s, it was demolished to make way for Toronto Metro Hall
1988/2023 – Looking east towards King St W and John St intersection in Toronto’s Wellington Place neighbourhood and Entertainment District.

The building on the left side of the foreground in both photos is the Eclipse Whitewear Building. It was built in 1903, and for more than 50 years, the company manufactured children’s and women’s underwear in the building. In 1973, the structure was designated as a heritage site due to its significance as one of the earliest warehouses in the area.

The two-storey building on the right side of the archive photo was built in the 19th century. Throughout the years, it was home to various businesses, including grocers and restaurants. In the late 1980s, it was demolished to make way for Toronto Metro Hall (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 1465, File 345, Item 17)

October 13, 1982/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of King St W and John St, in the Wellington Place neighbourhood and Entertainment District of Toronto. The archive photo shows when the corner was home to Farb’s Car Wash. It was in operation from 1953 until the late 1980s. Today, the block is occupied by TIFF Bell Lightbox and condo residences, which opened in 2010/11
October 13, 1982/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of King St W and John St, in the Wellington Place neighbourhood and Entertainment District of Toronto. The archive photo shows when the corner was home to Farb’s Car Wash. It was in operation from 1953 until the late 1980s. Today, the block is occupied by TIFF Bell Lightbox and condo residences, which opened in 2010/11 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 67, Item 39)

1972/2023 – Looking southeast towards the corner of King St W and John St, in the Wellington Place neighbourhood of Toronto. The building was constructed in the 19th century and was home to various businesses, including grocers and restaurants; however, it was also where Isabella Valancy Crawford (1846-1887) passed away. Born in Ireland, Miss Crawford is considered one of Canada's finest poets, and her best-known collection is "Old Spookses' Pass, Malcolm's Katie and Other Poems." The building was torn down in the 1980s to make way for Toronto Metro Hall. On a side note, a park is named in Isabella Valancy Crawford's honour at the southwest corner of John St and Front St W
1972/2023 – Looking southeast towards the corner of King St W and John St, in the Wellington Place neighbourhood of Toronto.

The building was constructed in the 19th century and was home to various businesses, including grocers and restaurants; however, it was also where Isabella Valancy Crawford (1846-1887) passed away. Born in Ireland, Miss Crawford is considered one of Canada’s finest poets, and her best-known collection is “Old Spookses’ Pass, Malcolm’s Katie and Other Poems.” The building was torn down in the 1980s to make way for Toronto Metro Hall.

On a side note, a park is named in Isabella Valancy Crawford’s honour at the southwest corner of John St and Front St W (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 78, Item 31)

July 15, 1973/2023 – Looking southwest towards the William Barber Building at the corner of King St W and John St, in Toronto’s Wellington Place neighbourhood. It was constructed in 1880 by William Barber, a grocer. The Second Empire-style, three-storey building features a shopfront and mansard roof. In the rear, along John St, is a two-storey wing and a small building that was originally a stable. The William Barber Building at 287-89 King St W was added to the city’s heritage register in 1977
July 15, 1973/2023 – Looking southwest towards the William Barber Building at the corner of King St W and John St, in Toronto’s Wellington Place neighbourhood.

It was constructed in 1880 by William Barber, a grocer. The Second Empire-style, three-storey building features a shopfront and mansard roof. In the rear, along John St, is a two-storey wing and a small building that was originally a stable. The William Barber Building at 287-89 King St W was added to the city’s heritage register in 1977 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 67, Item 40)

April 20, 1912/2023 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St W and Spadina Ave, in the Kensington-Chinatown neighbourhood of Toronto.

The building at 378 Queen St W was designed by architect George Wallace Gouinlock and constructed between 1902 and 1903 for the Bank of Hamilton. Following the merger of the Bank of Hamilton and the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce in 1924, the building continued to function as a branch of the CIBC. The building was granted heritage designation by the city in 1973.

In the archive photo, notice Duffins (gentlemen’s furnishings) on the far right. Today, it's home to the Horseshoe Tavern
April 20, 1912/2023 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St W and Spadina Ave, in the Kensington-Chinatown neighbourhood of Toronto.

The building at 378 Queen St W was designed by architect George Wallace Gouinlock and constructed between 1902 and 1903 for the Bank of Hamilton. Following the merger of the Bank of Hamilton and the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce in 1924, the building continued to function as a branch of the CIBC. The building was granted heritage designation by the city in 1973.

In the archive photo, notice Duffins (gentlemen’s furnishings) on the far right. Today, it’s home to the Horseshoe Tavern (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 113)

1919/2023 – Looking south on College St towards Campbell Russell Ln (between Augusta Ave and Bellevue Ave) in the Kensington Market neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice Dominion Business College building, today Planet Traveler Hostel on the left, and St Stephen-In-The-Fields Church on the right in both photos. The building on the left was constructed in 1915, while the church dates back to the mid-1800s
1919/2023 – Looking south on College St towards Campbell Russell Ln (between Augusta Ave and Bellevue Ave) in the Kensington Market neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice Dominion Business College building, today Planet Traveler Hostel on the left, and St Stephen-In-The-Fields Church on the right in both photos. The building on the left was constructed in 1915, while the church dates back to the mid-1800s (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 785)

October 13, 1938/2022 – Looking northeast on Yonge St from Charles St, straddling the Bay-Cloverhill and Church-Wellesley neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The building in the foreground on the right is Postal Station F. Built in 1905, the heritage-designated Edwardian-style structure was designed by architect David Ewart. Today, the former post office is home to commercial space.

In the archive photo, the light grey three-storey building a few doors up from the post office was constructed circa 1889. Over the building’s history, it has housed various businesses, including a lamp store, drug store, cigar shop, and art gallery. In 1949, it became the Brass Rail Tavern
October 13, 1938/2022 – Looking northeast on Yonge St from Charles St, straddling the Bay-Cloverhill and Church-Wellesley neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The building in the foreground on the right is Postal Station F. Built in 1905, the heritage-designated Edwardian-style structure was designed by architect David Ewart. Today, the former post office is home to commercial space.

In the archive photo, the light grey three-storey building a few doors up from the post office was constructed circa 1889. Over the building’s history, it has housed various businesses, including a lamp store, drug store, cigar shop, and art gallery. In 1949, it became the Brass Rail Tavern (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 1990)

1917/2023 – Looking southeast towards the corner of King St W and Dufferin St, in Toronto’s Liberty Village neighbourhood. Built in 1913 for A B Ormsby Factory, a galvanized iron works company. The archive photo shows Russell Motor Car Co Ltd, Plant No 2, later occupying the factory. The structure received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 2005. Today, the building is commercial and office space
1917/2023 – Looking southeast towards the corner of King St W and Dufferin St, in Toronto’s Liberty Village neighbourhood. Built in 1913 for A B Ormsby Factory, a galvanized iron works company. The archive photo shows Russell Motor Car Co Ltd, Plant No 2, later occupying the factory. The structure received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 2005. Today, the building is commercial and office space (Library and Archives Canada 3371129)

1932/2023 – Looking north from Dundas St W, just north of Bloor St W towards the Wallace Avenue Footbridge in the Junction Triangle and West Bend neighbourhoods of Toronto. Notice in the archive photo that there was a second staircase on the north side of the bridge
1932/2023 – Looking north from Dundas St W, just north of Bloor St W towards the Wallace Avenue Footbridge in the Junction Triangle and West Bend neighbourhoods of Toronto. Notice in the archive photo that there was a second staircase on the north side of the bridge (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9506)

1972/2023 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St E and Parliament St in Toronto’s Moss Park neighbourhood. In the archive photo, notice Becker’s in the three-storey building at the corner. The building was previously the Hotel Rupert, and its sign was visible on the east side of the second storey. In 1989, the building was destroyed by fire. The commercial block at 326 to 342 Queen St E is visible on the left side of both photos. It was constructed between 1884 and 1889. The city granted the row of buildings heritage status in 2020
1972/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St E and Parliament St in Toronto’s Moss Park neighbourhood. In the archive photo, notice Becker’s in the three-storey building at the corner. The building was previously the Hotel Rupert, and its sign was visible on the east side of the second storey.

In 1989, the building was destroyed by fire. The commercial block at 326 to 342 Queen St E is visible on the left side of both photos. It was constructed between 1884 and 1889. The city granted the row of buildings heritage status in 2020 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 16, Item 13)

March 23, 1949/2023 – Looking north up Gladstone Ave from Queen St W in the Queen Street West Art and Design District of Toronto. The Gladstone Hotel, built between 1889 and 1890, is in the foreground on the right in both pictures
March 23, 1949/2023 – Looking north up Gladstone Ave from Queen St W in the Queen Street West Art and Design District of Toronto. The Gladstone Hotel, built between 1889 and 1890, is in the foreground on the right in both pictures (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 1881)

March 1961/2022 – Looking southeast towards the corner of King St E and Church St, in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the four-storey building that once occupied the corner. It was torn down in the early 1970s. The present-day photo shows the corner today, which includes a block of three-storey commercial-residential buildings at 107 to 111 King St E, built around 1842. The city granted heritage status to the row of Georgian-style buildings on architectural and historic grounds in 1973
March 1961/2022 – Looking southeast towards the corner of King St E and Church St, in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the four-storey building that once occupied the corner. It was torn down in the early 1970s.

The present-day photo shows the corner today, which includes a block of three-storey commercial-residential buildings at 107 to 111 King St E, built around 1842. The city granted heritage status to the row of Georgian-style buildings on architectural and historic grounds in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 1, ID 66)

1976/2023 – The 2½-storey semi-detached homes are located at 9 and 11 Spadina Rd, north of Bloor St W and next to the Spadina subway station in the Annex neighbourhood of Toronto. These red brick-clad homes were built in 1889 and feature stone and wood detailing. Per the archive photo, 9 Spadina Rd previously served as the Karabanow Tourist Home. Interestingly, these homes were granted heritage status by the city in 1974
1976/2023 – The 2½-storey semi-detached homes are located at 9 and 11 Spadina Rd, north of Bloor St W and next to the Spadina subway station in the Annex neighbourhood of Toronto. These red brick-clad homes were built in 1889 and feature stone and wood detailing. Per the archive photo, 9 Spadina Rd previously served as the Karabanow Tourist Home. Interestingly, these homes were granted heritage status by the city in 1974 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 8700)

SOURCE
  • City of Toronto Heritage Register
  • Heritage Toronto
  • Ontario Heritage Trust
  • Ontario Heritage Trust: 107, 109 & 111 King St E
  • CIBC: 150 Years – A short story PDF dated 2017 (378 Queen St W)
  • Ontario Heritage Trust: 287 King St W (William Barber Building)
  • Heritage Toronto: Isabella Valancy Crawford plaque (King St W & John St, southeast corner)
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Feb 15, 1887, pg 2 (King St W & John St, southeast corner)
  • Toronto Star Newspaper Archives: Jul 13, 1989, pg A7 (King St W & John St, southeast corner)
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Nov 6, 1953, pg 25 (King St W & John St, northwest corner)
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Sep 7, 2007, pg G10 (King St W & John St, northwest corner)
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Sep 4, 2010, pg R7 (King St W & John St, northwest corner)
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Nov 6, 1953, pg 25 (King St W & John St, looking west)
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Sep 7, 2007, pg G10 (King St W & John St, looking west)
  • City of Toronto Heritage Register: 322 King St W (King St W & John St, looking east)
  • Ontario Heritage Trust: 322 King St W (King St W & John St, looking east)
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Sep 7, 2007, pg G10 (King St W & John St, looking east)
  • City of Toronto Heritage Register: 334 King St E (Aluminum & Crown Stopper Company)
  • City of Toronto Heritage Register: 91 Parliament St (Aluminum & Crown Stopper Company)
  • Lost Toronto by William Dendy (1978), pgs 69-69 (Bank of Upper Canada Building)
  • National Historic Site of Canada: Bank of Upper Canada Building
  • The Canadian Contract Record: Volume 4, Number 37, Nov 2, 1893, pg II (Michie & Co, 7 King St W)
  • Toronto Star Newspaper Archives: Aug 19, 2000, pgs R1 & R3 (Coghlan Building, 7 King St W)
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Jan 7, 1902, pg 2 (Sovereign Bank, King St E & George St, northwest corner)
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Jan 18, 1908, pg 1 (Sovereign Bank, King St E & George St, northwest corner)
  • Ontario Heritage Trust: York Mechanics’ Institute plaque
  • City of Toronto: Inclusion on the Heritage Register: 40 Colborne St, report dated Nov 15, 2016
  • Photo: Denise Marie for TorontoJourney416
  • Vintage Photos: City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Public Library, Archives of Ontario, CNE Heritage & Canadian National Exhibition Association Archives
  • Toronto City Directory courtesy of Toronto Public Library

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