Past & Present – Part 39

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September 27, 1981/2023 – Looking towards the Black Bull Tavern at the northeast corner of Queen St W St and Soho St, in Toronto's Entertainment District. The Black Bull Tavern building has a rich history. It was originally built circa 1833 and then rebuilt in 1886. The city recognized its significance and granted it heritage status in 1980. Today, it remains a beloved spot for locals and visitors alike, offering a cozy pub atmosphere, a wide selection of beers on tap, and hearty pub fare. Whether you're looking for a place to grab a drink after work or a spot to watch the game with friends, the Black Bull Tavern is worth a visit
September 27, 1981/2023 – Looking towards the Black Bull Tavern at the northeast corner of Queen St W St and Soho St, in Toronto’s Entertainment District. The Black Bull Tavern building has a rich history. It was originally built circa 1833 and then rebuilt in 1886. The city recognized its significance and granted it heritage status in 1980.

Today, it remains a beloved spot for locals and visitors alike, offering a cozy pub atmosphere, a wide selection of beers on tap, and hearty pub fare. Whether you’re looking for a place to grab a drink after work or a spot to watch the game with friends, the Black Bull Tavern is worth a visit (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 70, Item 41)

1985-90s/2022 - Looking southeast toward the second Captain John's Harbour Boat Restaurant once on Queens Quay at the foot of Yonge St on the Harbourfront of Toronto
1985-90s/2022 – Looking southeast toward the second Captain John’s Harbour Boat Restaurant once on Queens Quay at the foot of Yonge St on the Harbourfront of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 16, Item 1)

2021 – The front and back of the Brass Rail Tavern at 701 Yonge St, south of Bloor St, in the Church-Wellesley and Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhoods of Toronto. The building was constructed circa 1889 and has been home to various businesses, including a lamp shop, drug store, cigar shop, and art gallery. Since 1949, it has been the Brass Rail Tavern. The building was added to the city's heritage register in 2016
2021 – The front and back of the Brass Rail Tavern at 701 Yonge St, south of Bloor St, in the Church-Wellesley and Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhoods of Toronto. The building was constructed circa 1889 and has been home to various businesses, including a lamp shop, drug store, cigar shop, and art gallery. Since 1949, it has been the Brass Rail Tavern. The building was added to the city’s heritage register in 2016

May 22, 1979/2022 – Looking towards the southeast corner of King St E and Church St, in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood. The block of three-storey commercial-residential buildings at 107, 109 and 111 King St E were built around 1842. This row of Georgian-style buildings was granted heritage status by the city in 1973 due to their architectural and historical significance
May 22, 1979/2022 – Looking towards the southeast corner of King St E and Church St, in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood. The block of three-storey commercial-residential buildings at 107, 109 and 111 King St E were built around 1842. This row of Georgian-style buildings was granted heritage status by the city in 1973 due to their architectural and historical significance (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 64, Item 11)

Circa 1920/2022 – Looking southeast towards the corner of King St E and Leader Ln, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto
Circa 1920/2022 – Looking southeast towards the corner of King St E and Leader Ln, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 7101)

August 6, 1983/2020 – Looking southwest at the corner of King St W and John St in Toronto’s Wellington Place neighbourhood. The three-storey building directly at the corner is the William Barber Building. Constructed in 1880 in the Second Empire style, the structure received heritage designation from the city in 1977. To its right is the George Garden Building at 291 King St W. It was built in 1875 in the Italianate and Renaissance Revival styles and was granted heritage status in 2009. These multi-storey buildings featured a storefront with residential units above
August 6, 1983/2020 – Looking southwest at the corner of King St W and John St in Toronto’s Wellington Place neighbourhood.

The three-storey building directly at the corner is the William Barber Building. Constructed in 1880 in the Second Empire style, the structure received heritage designation from the city in 1977.

To its right is the George Garden Building at 291 King St W. It was built in 1875 in the Italianate and Renaissance Revival styles and was granted heritage status in 2009. These multi-storey buildings featured a storefront with residential units above (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 67, Item 43)

1955/2023 - The Royal Alexandra Theatre is located at 260 King St W in Toronto's Entertainment District. The beautiful theatre has had over 4,000 shows performed on its stage for over the century. Along with being Canada's first air-conditioned playhouse, the Royal Alex was also one of North America's first "fireproof" theatres. In the early 1960s, visionary Ed Mirvish saved the historic venue from demolition. In doing so, he started rejuvenating what we know today as the Entertainment District
1955/2023 – The Royal Alexandra Theatre is located at 260 King St W in Toronto’s Entertainment District. The beautiful theatre has had over 4,000 shows performed on its stage for over the century. Along with being Canada’s first air-conditioned playhouse, the Royal Alex was also one of North America’s first “fireproof” theatres.

In the early 1960s, visionary Ed Mirvish saved the historic venue from demolition. In doing so, he started rejuvenating what we know today as the Entertainment District (Toronto Public Library R-4963)

August 16, 1973/2023 – Looking southeast along Front St E between Scott St and Church St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The remaining 19th-century buildings along this stretch include (from right to left) the Beardmore Building at 35-39 Front St E (built 1872 and originally Griffith’s Block), the Perkins Block at 41-43 Front St E (built 1875), the Dixon Block at 45-47 Front St E (built 1872) and a warehouse at 49 Front St E (built 1873)
August 16, 1973/2023 – Looking southeast along Front St E between Scott St and Church St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

The remaining 19th-century buildings along this stretch include (from right to left) the Beardmore Building at 35-39 Front St E (built 1872 and originally Griffith’s Block), the Perkins Block at 41-43 Front St E (built 1875), the Dixon Block at 45-47 Front St E (built 1872) and a warehouse at 49 Front St E (built 1873) (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 60, Item 16)

March 18, 1929/2023 – Looking southeast towards the YWCA Toronto head office, originally the House of Industry, at the corner of Elm St at Elizabeth St in downtown Toronto. Built in 1848, the building was housing for low-income seniors. Architect William Thomas designed the building in the Tudor-Gothic style. In 1899, designs by architect EJ Lennox expanded the building, adding a third storey along with wings on the east and west sides. In 1946, the building was renamed the Laughlen Lodge, and in 1976, the east and west wings were removed. Today, the heritage-designated remnants of the House of Industry are the main entrance to YWCA Toronto's head office at 87 Elm St. Attached to the south side of the building is the Elm Centre, with 300 units of affordable and supportive housing
March 18, 1929/2023 – Looking southeast towards the YWCA Toronto head office, originally the House of Industry, at the corner of Elm St at Elizabeth St in downtown Toronto.

Built in 1848, the building was housing for low-income seniors. Architect William Thomas designed the building in the Tudor-Gothic style. In 1899, designs by architect EJ Lennox expanded the building, adding a third storey along with wings on the east and west sides. In 1946, the building was renamed the Laughlen Lodge, and in 1976, the east and west wings were removed.

Today, the heritage-designated remnants of the House of Industry are the main entrance to YWCA Toronto’s head office at 87 Elm St. Attached to the south side of the building is the Elm Centre, with 300 units of affordable and supportive housing (Toronto Public Library TSPA_0112859F)

July 19, 1983/March 26, 2023 – Looking northeast towards the former Palace Arms Hotel and Palace Tavern at 950 King St W and Strachan Ave, in the King West Village of Toronto. Built in 1890, architect Frederick Henry Herbert designed the building in the Romanesque Revival style. The building received heritage status from the city in 1984. There are plans to incorporate the building’s historic façade into a mixed-use development
July 19, 1983/March 26, 2023 – Looking northeast towards the former Palace Arms Hotel and Palace Tavern at 950 King St W and Strachan Ave, in the King West Village of Toronto. Built in 1890, architect Frederick Henry Herbert designed the building in the Romanesque Revival style. The building received heritage status from the city in 1984. There are plans to incorporate the building’s historic façade into a mixed-use development (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 74, Item 39)

1972/2023 - Looking northeast towards the corner of Front St E and Scott St, in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the King Edward Hotel on the left, the Cathedral Church of St James steeple in the center and the Gooderham “Flatiron” Building on the right
1972/2023 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Front St E and Scott St, in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the King Edward Hotel on the left, the Cathedral Church of St James steeple in the center and the Gooderham “Flatiron” Building on the right (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 13, Item 16)

August 17, 1947/2022 – Canadian Blood Services, originally the Victoria Hospital For Sick Children, is located at the southeast corner of College St and Elizabeth St in the Discovery District of Toronto. Built in 1889/91, architects Darling & Curry designed the former hospital in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. It was built with funds provided by J Ross Robertson, founder of the Toronto Telegram. The hospital opened in 1892 and moved out of the building in 1951 when the present-day SickKids Hospital was completed. The building at 67 College St received heritage designation from the city in 1973
August 17, 1947/2022 – Canadian Blood Services, originally the Victoria Hospital For Sick Children, is located at the southeast corner of College St and Elizabeth St in the Discovery District of Toronto.

Built in 1889/91, architects Darling & Curry designed the former hospital in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. It was built with funds provided by J Ross Robertson, founder of the Toronto Telegram. The hospital opened in 1892 and moved out of the building in 1951 when the present-day SickKids Hospital was completed. The building at 67 College St received heritage designation from the city in 1973 (Toronto Public Library TSPA_0113248F)

Between 1980s-90s/2023 – Looking southwest towards 63-65 Charles St W in the Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood of Toronto. The 3-storey, Second Empire style, semi-detached house was built in 1884. It’s the last surviving home on the block, once filled with this type of residential architecture. From the early 1990s to 2010, it was the Stephenson House, a Victoria University residence. Today, the heritage-designated structure continues to be part of Victoria University and is home to its Human Resources department
Between 1980s-90s/2023 – Looking southwest towards 63-65 Charles St W in the Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood of Toronto. The 3-storey, Second Empire style, semi-detached house was built in 1884. It’s the last surviving home on the block, once filled with this type of residential architecture.

From the early 1990s to 2010, it was the Stephenson House, a Victoria University residence. Today, the heritage-designated structure continues to be part of Victoria University and is home to its Human Resources department (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 205, Item 4)

August 25, 1983/2023 – Looking northwest along Queen St E towards Broadview Ave in Toronto’s Riverside neighbourhood. In the distance is the Broadview Hotel. It was built in 1891/92 and originally Dingman’s Hall. In 1907/08, the building was converted to The Broadview Hotel. The Romanesque Revival style structure received heritage status from the city in 1975
August 25, 1983/2023 – Looking northwest along Queen St E towards Broadview Ave in Toronto’s Riverside neighbourhood. In the distance is the Broadview Hotel. It was built in 1891/92 and originally Dingman’s Hall. In 1907/08, the building was converted to The Broadview Hotel. The Romanesque Revival style structure received heritage status from the city in 1975 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 75, Item 76)

Between 1980s-90s/2023 – Looking southeast along Charles St W from St Thomas St in Toronto's Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood. Notice the orange brick semi-detached home at 63-65 St Charles St W on the left in both photos. The home was built in 1884, and the stretch of Charles St W was once lined with this style of residential architecture. Before 1909, Charles St W was known as Czar St
Between 1980s-90s/2023 – Looking southeast along Charles St W from St Thomas St in Toronto’s Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood. Notice the orange brick semi-detached home at 63-65 St Charles St W on the left in both photos. The home was built in 1884, and the stretch of Charles St W was once lined with this style of residential architecture. Before 1909, Charles St W was known as Czar St (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 205, Item 8)

1972/2023 – Looking southwest at Queen St E and Parliament St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The building at the corner was designed by architect Henry Simpson for the Home Furniture Carpet Company in 1907. The store, owned by John F Brown, sold furniture, appliances and clothing. In 1926, the store needed more space, so an extension was added to the west side. In 1978, Marty Millionaire Ltd occupied the building and remained there until 2014. Three years later, the heritage-designated building was renovated for WE Charity’s Global Learning Centre
1972/2023 – Looking southwest at Queen St E and Parliament St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The building at the corner was designed by architect Henry Simpson for the Home Furniture Carpet Company in 1907. The store, owned by John F Brown, sold furniture, appliances and clothing. In 1926, the store needed more space, so an extension was added to the west side.

In 1978, Marty Millionaire Ltd occupied the building and remained there until 2014. Three years later, the heritage-designated building was renovated for WE Charity’s Global Learning Centre (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 16, Item 16)

1972/2023 – Looking southeast toward the corner of Sultan St and St Thomas St in Toronto's Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood. The archive photo shows a semi-detached home on the south side of Sultan St, while the present-day photo shows all of the red brick homes along this stretch. From left to right, they include: 1 Sultan St was built in 1880, features Second Empire architecture, and is known as the Brown-Inglis House. The semi-detached homes from 3 to 9 Sultan St were built in 1888 by Charles R Rundle in the Romanesque Revival style. The heritage-designated structures are important examples of the popular styles of homes built in the area in the late 19th century
1972/2023 – Looking southeast toward the corner of Sultan St and St Thomas St in Toronto’s Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood. The archive photo shows a semi-detached home on the south side of Sultan St, while the present-day photo shows all of the red brick homes along this stretch.

From left to right, they include: 1 Sultan St was built in 1880, features Second Empire architecture, and is known as the Brown-Inglis House. The semi-detached homes from 3 to 9 Sultan St were built in 1888 by Charles R Rundle in the Romanesque Revival style. The heritage-designated structures are important examples of the popular styles of homes built in the area in the late 19th century (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 66, Item 24)

1972/2023 – Looking northeast towards 314 Adelaide St E, just east of Fredrick St, in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The old building is home to Artik Promotional Products, a shop for custom print and embroidery on T-shirts, stickers, magnets and apparel. The west side of the building features a mural of a group of people created by artist Elicser Elliott in 2010. Adelaide St E between Jarvis St and Parliament St was once known as Duke St
1972/2023 – Looking northeast towards 314 Adelaide St E, just east of Fredrick St, in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The old building is home to Artik Promotional Products, a shop for custom print and embroidery on T-shirts, stickers, magnets and apparel.

The west side of the building features a mural of a group of people created by artist Elicser Elliott in 2010. Adelaide St E between Jarvis St and Parliament St was once known as Duke St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 18, Item 2)

1972/2023 – Looking northeast along Adelaide St E from George St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. 

The group of buildings ranging from 252 to 264 Adelaide St E were initially the Bank of Upper Canada (built in 1825/27), De La Salle Institute (built in 1871) and Toronto’s First Post Office (built in 1833/34 and is once again a post office today). The buildings received heritage designation from the city in 1973
1972/2023 – Looking northeast along Adelaide St E from George St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto.

The group of buildings ranging from 252 to 264 Adelaide St E were initially the Bank of Upper Canada (built in 1825/27), De La Salle Institute (built in 1871) and Toronto’s First Post Office (built in 1833/34 and is once again a post office today). The buildings received heritage designation from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 20, Item 3)

2023/August 1982 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Bloor St W and Lippincott St, in the Harbord Village and The Annex neighbourhoods of Toronto. 

Built in 1914 as a Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce branch, architect Victor Daniel Horsburgh designed many of the financial institution's branches across Canada from approximately 1910 to 1931. The heritage-designated building was home to the bank until the mid-1980s when it was converted to Paupers Pub
2023/August 1982 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Bloor St W and Lippincott St, in the Harbord Village and The Annex neighbourhoods of Toronto.

Built in 1914 as a Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce branch, architect Victor Daniel Horsburgh designed many of the financial institution’s branches across Canada from approximately 1910 to 1931. The heritage-designated building was home to the bank until the mid-1980s when it was converted to Paupers Pub (Toronto Public Library LOCHIST-PM-021)

1963/2023 – Looking southeast along Gerrard St W, between Elizabeth St and Bay St, in downtown Toronto. The neighbourhood was once known as Gerrard Village. The street was lined with small shops, tea rooms, and coffee shops and was home to artists and writers, including Ernest Hemingway and Pierre Burton. Today, this stretch of Gerrard St W is the site of a mixed-use building
1963/2023 – Looking southeast along Gerrard St W, between Elizabeth St and Bay St, in downtown Toronto. The neighbourhood was once known as Gerrard Village.

The street was lined with small shops, tea rooms, and coffee shops and was home to artists and writers, including Ernest Hemingway and Pierre Burton. Today, this stretch of Gerrard St W is the site of a mixed-use building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 1, ID 117)

1971/2023 – Looking northwest from Gerrard St W towards Benjamin Johnson House and Laplante Ave in downtown Toronto. In 1875, Mr Johnson, a bricklayer, built the majestic residence for his own use. It's part of the last remaining block of early buildings in the bygone neighbourhood known as Gerrard Village. The building received heritage designation from the city in 1974 and is today home to Jimmy's Coffee
1971/2023 – Looking northwest from Gerrard St W towards Benjamin Johnson House and Laplante Ave in downtown Toronto.

In 1875, Mr Johnson, a bricklayer, built the majestic residence for his own use. It’s part of the last remaining block of early buildings in the bygone neighbourhood known as Gerrard Village. The building received heritage designation from the city in 1974 and is today home to Jimmy’s Coffee (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 60, Item 123)

1972/2023 – Looking south from St Thomas St towards Charles St W, in the Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood of Toronto
1972/2023 – Looking south from St Thomas St towards Charles St W, in the Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 66, Item 29)

On September 16, 1949, the SS Noronic docked at Pier 9 on Toronto’s waterfront. The Great Lakes cruise ship had 524 mostly American passengers and 171 crew on board. 

At approximately 1:30 in the morning on Sep 17, 1949, a fire was discovered in a linen closet. But, before everyone could be woken from their sleep, the fire quickly turned into an inferno. Those who could exit the ship did so by the gangway, climbing down ropes or jumping into the harbour or onto the pier.  Over 1,000 firefighters, police and passers-by assisted, but in the end, 119 people perished. Almost all were American passengers. The Horticulture Building at Exhibition Place became an impromptu morgue.  A federal inquiry into the tragedy resulted in stricter fire safety regulations.  

On the 50th anniversary of the disaster, Ontario Heritage Trust installed a plaque on Toronto’s waterfront at the foot of Bay St. It’s located just west of the Jack Layton Ferry Terminal docks, about 100 m west of where the ship burned
On September 16, 1949, the SS Noronic docked at Pier 9 on Toronto’s waterfront. The Great Lakes cruise ship had 524 mostly American passengers and 171 crew on board.

At approximately 1:30 in the morning on Sep 17, 1949, a fire was discovered in a linen closet. But, before everyone could be woken from their sleep, the fire quickly turned into an inferno. Those who could exit the ship did so by the gangway, climbing down ropes or jumping into the harbour or onto the pier. Over 1,000 firefighters, police and passers-by assisted, but in the end, 119 people perished. Almost all were American passengers. The Horticulture Building at Exhibition Place became an impromptu morgue. A federal inquiry into the tragedy resulted in stricter fire safety regulations.

On the 50th anniversary of the disaster, Ontario Heritage Trust installed a plaque on Toronto’s waterfront at the foot of Bay St. It’s located just west of the Jack Layton Ferry Terminal docks, about 100 m west of where the ship burned (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 1429)

August 1979/2023 – Looking southeast along St Thomas St, between Bloor St W and Sultan St, in the Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood of Toronto. 

The archive photo shows Le Provencal Restaurant and Café once located at 23 St Thomas St. The restaurant opened in 1963 and featured fine French cuisine and wines. A large fireplace made the dining rooms glow, a well softly splashed water and the warm woods created a charming ambiance. Le Provencal closed in 1988, and today, the site is home to commercial and mixed-use buildings
August 1979/2023 – Looking southeast along St Thomas St, between Bloor St W and Sultan St, in the Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood of Toronto.

The archive photo shows Le Provencal Restaurant and Café once located at 23 St Thomas St. The restaurant opened in 1963 and featured fine French cuisine and wines. A large fireplace made the dining rooms glow, a well softly splashed water and the warm woods created a charming ambiance. Le Provencal closed in 1988, and today, the site is home to commercial and mixed-use buildings (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 15, ID 19)

1965/2023 – Looking southeast along Gerrard St W between Bay St and Yonge St in Toronto's Downtown Yonge area. The archive photo shows the colourfully painted shops that once lined the Gerrard Village street, including The Unicorn (a boutique), the Village Bookstore and The Artisans. 

Notice the Toronto Dominion Bank at Yonge St on the left and the blue 1965 Chevy Impala. Today, this stretch of Gerrard St W is home to The Livmore condo and Chelsea Hotel
1965/2023 – Looking southeast along Gerrard St W between Bay St and Yonge St in Toronto’s Downtown Yonge area. The archive photo shows the colourfully painted shops that once lined the Gerrard Village street, including The Unicorn (a boutique), the Village Bookstore and The Artisans.

Notice the Toronto Dominion Bank at Yonge St on the left and the blue 1965 Chevy Impala. Today, this stretch of Gerrard St W is home to The Livmore condo and Chelsea Hotel (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 1, ID 146)

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