Past & Present – Part 38

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Circa 1888/2022 – Looking towards the Black Bull Tavern, at the northeast corner of Queen St W St and Soho St, in Toronto's Entertainment District. The tavern has a rich history dating back to 1833, when it was first built. It was later rebuilt in 1886 and recognized for its historical significance by the city, which granted it heritage status in 1980. Throughout its long history, the tavern has remained a popular neighbourhood spot among locals and visitors
Circa 1888/2022 – Looking towards the Black Bull Tavern, at the northeast corner of Queen St W St and Soho St, in Toronto’s Entertainment District. The tavern has a rich history dating back to 1833, when it was first built. It was later rebuilt in 1886 and recognized for its historical significance by the city, which granted it heritage status in 1980. Throughout its long history, the tavern has remained a popular neighbourhood spot among locals and visitors (Toronto Public Library B1-70B)

January 1988/2022 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Richmond St W and Duncan St in the Entertainment District of Toronto. Built in 1909, the 3-storey commercial building at 250 Richmond St W was once home to Bernard Carins Limited and later the nightclubs Go-Go's, Whiskey Saigon and Joe. 

CHUM Radio would move to their new home at 250 Richmond St W in 2009, along with the famous CHUM DIAL 1050 neon sign. The building, which is also the headquarters for Bell Media's radio operations, received heritage status from the city in 2017. 

Notice the ghost sign for the Acme Carbon & Ribbon Company Limited. You'll find it on the east side of the building next door
January 1988/2022 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Richmond St W and Duncan St in the Entertainment District of Toronto. Built in 1909, the 3-storey commercial building at 250 Richmond St W was once home to Bernard Carins Limited and later the nightclubs Go-Go’s, Whiskey Saigon and Joe.

CHUM Radio would move to their new home at 250 Richmond St W in 2009, along with the famous CHUM DIAL 1050 neon sign. The building, which is also the headquarters for Bell Media’s radio operations, received heritage status from the city in 2017.

Notice the ghost sign for the Acme Carbon & Ribbon Company Limited. You’ll find it on the east side of the building next door (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 3, ID 157)

Between 1936-37/2022 – Looking southwest on College St, just west of Bay St, towards Canadian Blood Services, originally the Victoria Hospital For Sick Children in Toronto’s Discovery District. The hospital was built in 1889/91 and designed by architects Darling & Curry in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. J Ross Robertson, founder of the Toronto Telegram, donated the generous funding to build the hospital. In 1951, the hospital vacated the building when the present-day SickKids Hospital at 555 University Avenue was completed. The former hospital building at 67 College St received heritage status from the city in 1973
Between 1936-37/2022 – Looking southwest on College St, just west of Bay St, towards Canadian Blood Services, originally the Victoria Hospital For Sick Children in Toronto’s Discovery District.

The hospital was built in 1889/91 and designed by architects Darling & Curry in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. J Ross Robertson, founder of the Toronto Telegram, donated the generous funding to build the hospital. In 1951, the hospital vacated the building when the present-day SickKids Hospital at 555 University Avenue was completed. The former hospital building at 67 College St received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 4620)

2021/January 2023 – Looking northeast towards the former Palace Arms Hotel and Palace Tavern at 950 King St W and Strachan Ave, in the King West Village of Toronto. Built in 1890, architect Frederick Henry Herbert designed the building in the Romanesque Revival style. The building received heritage status from the city in 1984. There are plans to incorporate the building’s historic façade into a mixed-use development
2021/January 2023 – Looking northeast towards the former Palace Arms Hotel and Palace Tavern at 950 King St W and Strachan Ave, in the King West Village of Toronto. Built in 1890, architect Frederick Henry Herbert designed the building in the Romanesque Revival style. The building received heritage status from the city in 1984. There are plans to incorporate the building’s historic façade into a mixed-use development

2023/1953 – The present-day photo shows 63-65 Charles St W in the Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood of Toronto, and the archive photo shows 78-80 St Mary St, which is on the same block. Built in the 1880s, these 3-storey, Second Empire style, semi-detached style homes once filled the block, and the building at 63-65 Charles St W is the last surviving example.
The archive photo shows when 78-80 St Mary St was the Stephenson House, a Victoria University residence. In the early 1990s, the residence moved to 63-65 Charles St W, shown in the present-day photo and served as that until 2010. Today, the heritage-designated structure continues to be part of Victoria University and is home to its Human Resources department
2023/1953 – The present-day photo shows 63-65 Charles St W in the Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhood of Toronto, and the archive photo shows 78-80 St Mary St, which is on the same block. Built in the 1880s, these 3-storey, Second Empire style, semi-detached style homes once filled the block, and the building at 63-65 Charles St W is the last surviving example.

The archive photo shows when 78-80 St Mary St was the Stephenson House, a Victoria University residence. In the early 1990s, the residence moved to 63-65 Charles St W, shown in the present-day photo and served as that until 2010. Today, the heritage-designated structure continues to be part of Victoria University and is home to its Human Resources department (Toronto Panoramic Photography Company. Victoria University Archives (Toronto), 1991.161, Item 527)

1972/2023 – The Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Building, originally the Dominion Meteorological Building, is located at the southwest corner of Bloor St W and Devonshire Pl at the University of Toronto – St George Campus.

Built between 1908 and 1909, the castle-like building was designed by the architectural firm of Burke & Horwood. It was the Meteorological Service of Canada headquarters responsible for weather forecasting until 1971. The 2½-storey Romanesque Revival-style building is clad with rugged Miramichi sandstone. It features an observation tower and beautiful stone carvings at the main entrance. The tower was once topped with a dome and housed a telescope. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973
1972/2023 – The Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Building, originally the Dominion Meteorological Building, is located at the southwest corner of Bloor St W and Devonshire Pl at the University of Toronto – St George Campus.

Built between 1908 and 1909, the castle-like building was designed by the architectural firm of Burke & Horwood. It was the Meteorological Service of Canada headquarters responsible for weather forecasting until 1971. The 2½-storey Romanesque Revival-style building is clad with rugged Miramichi sandstone. It features an observation tower and beautiful stone carvings at the main entrance. The tower was once topped with a dome and housed a telescope. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 66, Item 32)

June 1974/March 1975 – The former Hollywood Theatre was once located at 1519 Yonge St, north of St Clair St on the east side in the Deer Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The theatre opened in the early 1930s. As the decades passed, attendance declined, and the theatre eventually closed in 1999
June 1974/March 1975 – The former Hollywood Theatre was once located at 1519 Yonge St, north of St Clair St on the east side in the Deer Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The theatre opened in the early 1930s. As the decades passed, attendance declined, and the theatre eventually closed in 1999 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 1, Item 10 & 12)

April 1907/2021 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Bloor St W and Brunswick Ave, in the Annex neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the vacant land up for sale. Today, the corner is the site of a mixed-use home and commercial buildings in a busy area home to many University of Toronto fraternity houses and faculty members
April 1907/2021 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Bloor St W and Brunswick Ave, in the Annex neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the vacant land up for sale. Today, the corner is the site of a mixed-use home and commercial buildings in a busy area home to many University of Toronto fraternity houses and faculty members (Toronto Public Library E4-83B)

1962/2023 – The Manulife Building is located at 200 Bloor St E in Toronto’s Yorkville neighbourhood. Built between 1924 and 1925 and known initially as the Manufacturers' Life Insurance Company Building, the magnificent structure was designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph, with later additions by Marani & Morris. Manufacturers Life began in 1887 at the back of a small store once at 38 King St E. After years of steady growth, the company needed larger offices frequently, moving into the Bloor St E building in 1925. The classically styled building is clad with grey stone and features a colonnaded porch at the main entrance
1962/2023 – The Manulife Building is located at 200 Bloor St E in Toronto’s Yorkville neighbourhood. Built between 1924 and 1925 and known initially as the Manufacturers’ Life Insurance Company Building, the magnificent structure was designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph, with later additions by Marani & Morris.

Manufacturers Life began in 1887 at the back of a small store once at 38 King St E. After years of steady growth, the company needed larger offices frequently, moving into the Bloor St E building in 1925. The classically styled building is clad with grey stone and features a colonnaded porch at the main entrance (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 8912)

June 22, 2007/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Gould St in Toronto’s Downtown Yonge area. In 1961, Sam the Record Man moved to 347 Yonge St. The store was a huge attraction and, over the years, gradually expanded, eventually occupying the entire corner. The store closed in 2007, and the corner is today the site of the Toronto Metropolitan University Student Learning Centre. Sam the Record Man’s iconic signs are atop a building at Dundas St E and Victoria St
June 22, 2007/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Gould St in Toronto’s Downtown Yonge area. In 1961, Sam the Record Man moved to 347 Yonge St. The store was a huge attraction and, over the years, gradually expanded, eventually occupying the entire corner. The store closed in 2007, and the corner is today the site of the Toronto Metropolitan University Student Learning Centre. Sam the Record Man’s iconic signs are atop a building at Dundas St E and Victoria St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 219, Series 2311, File 2401, Item 1)

1972/2023 – Looking northeast towards the Benjamin Johnson House, at the corner of Gerrard St W and Laplante Ave in downtown Toronto. The three-storey brick house was built in 1875 by Benjamin Johnson. The majestic home received heritage status from the city in 1974. Today Jimmy's Coffee occupies the building
1972/2023 – Looking northeast towards the Benjamin Johnson House, at the corner of Gerrard St W and Laplante Ave in downtown Toronto. The three-storey brick house was built in 1875 by Benjamin Johnson. The majestic home received heritage status from the city in 1974. Today Jimmy’s Coffee occupies the building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 67, Item 26)

1972/2023 – Looking towards the northeast corner of George St and Richmond St E in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the Richmond Restaurant, today home to the George Street Diner
1972/2023 – Looking towards the northeast corner of George St and Richmond St E in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the Richmond Restaurant, today home to the George Street Diner (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 20, Item 1)

1972/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Spadina Ave and Harbord St, in the Harbord Village neighbourhood of Toronto
1972/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Spadina Ave and Harbord St, in the Harbord Village neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 55, Item 19)

Jun 4, 1913/2023 – Looking northwest on Parliament St, just south of Queen St E, in the Moss Park neighbourhood. The archive photo shows the public underground lavatory entrances and ventilation shaft. It was Toronto’s third underground bathroom, and it opened in 1912. There were facilities for both men and women. The three-storey, brick-clad Chicago School-style building next to the lavatory is the Home Furniture Carpet Co Ltd. It was designed in 1907 by architect Henry Simpson. The store was operated by John F Brown and sold appliances, furniture and clothing. An extension was added on the west side in 1926 to increase retail space. From 1978 to 2014, the building was home to Marty Millionaire. In 2017, the building was renovated for WE Charity, and that same year, the structure received heritage designation under the Ontario Heritage Act
Jun 4, 1913/2023 – Looking northwest on Parliament St, just south of Queen St E, in the Moss Park neighbourhood. The archive photo shows the public underground lavatory entrances and ventilation shaft. It was Toronto’s third underground bathroom, and it opened in 1912. There were facilities for both men and women.

The three-storey, brick-clad Chicago School-style building next to the lavatory is the Home Furniture Carpet Co Ltd. It was designed in 1907 by architect Henry Simpson. The store was operated by John F Brown and sold appliances, furniture and clothing. An extension was added on the west side in 1926 to increase retail space. From 1978 to 2014, the building was home to Marty Millionaire. In 2017, the building was renovated for WE Charity, and that same year, the structure received heritage designation under the Ontario Heritage Act (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 7308)

January 1971/2023 – Looking southeast towards what was originally the Little York Hotel and Stable at the corner of King St E and George St, in Toronto’s Old Town neighbourhood. Built between 1879 and 1880, architects Langley, Langley and Burke designed the four-storey hotel (at 187 King St E) and stable (in rear at 65 George St) for the innkeeper Robert Waterhouse. 

The Second Empire-style red brick former hotel building features a mansard roof and carved keystones over the arched entrances and windows on the King St E side. Today, the heritage-designated buildings are home to commercial space. Before the construction of the Little York Hotel, the corner was the site of the first public school in the Town of York, which opened on June 1, 1807
January 1971/2023 – Looking southeast towards what was originally the Little York Hotel and Stable at the corner of King St E and George St, in Toronto’s Old Town neighbourhood. Built between 1879 and 1880, architects Langley, Langley and Burke designed the four-storey hotel (at 187 King St E) and stable (in rear at 65 George St) for the innkeeper Robert Waterhouse.

The Second Empire-style red brick former hotel building features a mansard roof and carved keystones over the arched entrances and windows on the King St E side. Today, the heritage-designated buildings are home to commercial space. Before the construction of the Little York Hotel, the corner was the site of the first public school in the Town of York, which opened on June 1, 1807 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 2, ID 103)

January 5, 1932/2023 – Looking southwest along Richmond St W between Brant St and Maud St, in the Fashion District of Toronto. The archive photo shows St Andrew's Market, which once occupied a large portion of the block. In 1932, the market was torn down and replaced with the Water Works Building. Notice the roadside gas pump. Today, the heritage-designated façade of the former Water Works Building has been incorporated into the new mixed-use building called Waterworks Toronto
January 5, 1932/2023 – Looking southwest along Richmond St W between Brant St and Maud St, in the Fashion District of Toronto. The archive photo shows St Andrew’s Market, which once occupied a large portion of the block. In 1932, the market was torn down and replaced with the Water Works Building. Notice the roadside gas pump. Today, the heritage-designated façade of the former Water Works Building has been incorporated into the new mixed-use building called Waterworks Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 51)

August 25, 1957/2021 - Looking southeast towards the Jolly Miller Hotel, today’s Miller Tavern, at the northeast corner of Yonge St and Mill St in North York’s Hoggs Hollow neighbourhood. William and James Hogg constructed the building circa 1857, and it was initially the York Mills Hotel. From 1889 until 1925, it was known as Birrell’s Hotel, but it gradually gained a shady reputation. In 1930, the building was remodelled and renamed the Jolly Miller Hotel. It was a fine dining and dancing club that featured live entertainment for a brief period before slipping back to its previous notoriety. By the mid-1960s, the Jolly Miller was strictly a tavern. In 1997, the property was purchased by the City of North York, and the tavern closed. The old hotel was later renovated, and since 2004, the heritage-designated building has been home to the Miller Tavern
August 25, 1957/2021 – Looking southeast towards the Jolly Miller Hotel, today’s Miller Tavern, at the northeast corner of Yonge St and Mill St in North York’s Hoggs Hollow neighbourhood.

William and James Hogg constructed the building circa 1857, and it was initially the York Mills Hotel. From 1889 until 1925, it was known as Birrell’s Hotel, but it gradually gained a shady reputation. In 1930, the building was remodelled and renamed the Jolly Miller Hotel. It was a fine dining and dancing club that featured live entertainment for a brief period before slipping back to its previous notoriety. By the mid-1960s, the Jolly Miller was strictly a tavern.

In 1997, the property was purchased by the City of North York, and the tavern closed. The old hotel was later renovated, and since 2004, the heritage-designated building has been home to the Miller Tavern (Toronto Public Library R-6157)

1972/2023 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Front St E and George St, in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. On the left side of the archive photo, notice Turner Wines. The building it was located in was built in 1879 and still exists today. The parking lot at the corner was once the site of Roach’s Hotel and, later, Lapp’s Hotel and the Royal Canadian Hotel
1972/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Front St E and George St, in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. On the left side of the archive photo, notice Turner Wines. The building it was located in was built in 1879 and still exists today. The parking lot at the corner was once the site of Roach’s Hotel and, later, Lapp’s Hotel and the Royal Canadian Hotel (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 20, Item 12)

1953/2020 – The Yonge St entrance to the Eaton's College Street store, today known as College Park, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The archive photo shows the entrance decorated for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. The Art Deco-style building was completed in 1930. It was Eaton's Furniture and House Furnishings store and sold "wearables and accessories." Eaton's closed this location in 1977, and two years later, it became College Park, a mixed-use complex
1953/2020 – The Yonge St entrance to the Eaton’s College Street store, today known as College Park, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The archive photo shows the entrance decorated for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.

The Art Deco-style building was completed in 1930. It was Eaton’s Furniture and House Furnishings store and sold “wearables and accessories.” Eaton’s closed this location in 1977, and two years later, it became College Park, a mixed-use complex (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 492, Item 26)

1972/2023 – Looking southwest at the corner of King St E and George St in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. Built circa 1833 for George Monro, the commercial building at the corner was the Imported British & India-Goods Wholesale Warehouse. Mr Monro was a dry goods merchant who served as the Mayor of Toronto in 1841. By the late 1860s, the building became home to the Thomas Thompson company, which sold saddles, harnesses and trunks. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 and today is also known as the Thomas Thompson Building
1972/2023 – Looking southwest at the corner of King St E and George St in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. Built circa 1833 for George Monro, the commercial building at the corner was the Imported British & India-Goods Wholesale Warehouse. Mr Monro was a dry goods merchant who served as the Mayor of Toronto in 1841.

By the late 1860s, the building became home to the Thomas Thompson company, which sold saddles, harnesses and trunks. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 and today is also known as the Thomas Thompson Building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 20, Item 11)

2022/1961 - The Dufferin Gate is located near the foot of Dufferin St at Exhibition Place in Toronto.
Completed for the opening of the 1959 CNE, architect Arthur G Keith of the firm AD Margison and Associates designed the Mid-Century Modern style parabolic archway. The Dufferin Gate stands 20 m or 65 ft tall and cost over $250,000 to build. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1993
2022/1961 – The Dufferin Gate is located near the foot of Dufferin St at Exhibition Place in Toronto. Completed for the opening of the 1959 CNE, architect Arthur G Keith of the firm AD Margison and Associates designed the Mid-Century Modern style parabolic archway. The Dufferin Gate stands 20 m or 65 ft tall and cost over $250,000 to build. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1993 (Courtesy of the Canadian National Exhibition Archives, Alexandra Studio Fonds, MG5-F496-I7)

Looking southwest towards the corner of Gerrard St E and Jarvis St, in the Garden District of Toronto. The archive photo shows Nicholls Drug Store and a fire-ravaged Avonmore Hotel. The hotel opened in 1891; however, in March 1940, a fatal blaze swept through the building. The hotel continued to operate for the next few decades. In the late 1970s, the corner became a parking lot, and today, it’s the site of a residential building
Looking southwest towards the corner of Gerrard St E and Jarvis St, in the Garden District of Toronto. The archive photo shows Nicholls Drug Store and a fire-ravaged Avonmore Hotel. The hotel opened in 1891; however, in March 1940, a fatal blaze swept through the building. The hotel continued to operate for the next few decades. In the late 1970s, the corner became a parking lot, and today, it’s the site of a residential building (Toronto Public Library TSPA_0113448F)

1990/2023 – Looking southwest along Front St E from Market St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto
1990/2023 – Looking southwest along Front St E from Market St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 693, Item 17)

1982/January 21, 2023 - Looking northwest towards the Royal Alexandra Theatre at 260 King St W in Toronto's Entertainment District. Built in 1907, architect John McIntosh Lyle designed the Beaux-Arts-style building. Visionary Ed Mirvish, the owner of the former Honest Ed's, saved the theatre from demolition in the early 1960s. His complete restoration of the theatre started the area's rejuvenation, and today, the theatre is a National Historic Site of Canada. The archive photo shows the former Ed's Warehouse next to the theatre
1982/January 21, 2023 – Looking northwest towards the Royal Alexandra Theatre at 260 King St W in Toronto’s Entertainment District. Built in 1907, architect John McIntosh Lyle designed the Beaux-Arts-style building.

Visionary Ed Mirvish, the owner of the former Honest Ed’s, saved the theatre from demolition in the early 1960s. His complete restoration of the theatre started the area’s rejuvenation, and today, the theatre is a National Historic Site of Canada. The archive photo shows the former Ed’s Warehouse next to the theatre (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 530, Item 17)

1972/2023 – Looking towards the southwest corner of Gerrard St E and Jarvis St in Toronto's Garden District. In the archive photo, notice the Avon Smoke Shop and, behind it, the 2-storey building that had been home to the Avonmore Hotel from 1891 until the early 1970s. The corner became a parking lot in the late 1970s, and today, a residential building is located on the site
1972/2023 – Looking towards the southwest corner of Gerrard St E and Jarvis St in Toronto’s Garden District. In the archive photo, notice the Avon Smoke Shop and, behind it, the 2-storey building that had been home to the Avonmore Hotel from 1891 until the early 1970s. The corner became a parking lot in the late 1970s, and today, a residential building is located on the site (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 9, Item 5)

1980s/2023 – Looking east towards McGill St from Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The intersection where McGill St and Yonge St once met was closed in the early 1980s, and a parkette was created. The stone arch, now known as the McGill Street Arch, came from the former St Andrew's United Church, located on Bloor St E. The church was demolished in 1981, and its stone arch was preserved, relocated and rebuilt as a pedestrian gateway (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 36, Item 71)
1980s/2023 – Looking east towards McGill St from Yonge St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The intersection where McGill St and Yonge St once met was closed in the early 1980s, and a parkette was created. The stone arch, now known as the McGill Street Arch, came from the former St Andrew’s United Church, located on Bloor St E. The church was demolished in 1981, and its stone arch was preserved, relocated and rebuilt as a pedestrian gateway (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 36, Item 71)

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