Past & Present – Part 31

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2022/2020 - Royal Alexandra Theatre is located at 260 King St W in Toronto's Entertainment District. Built in 1907, architect John McIntosh Lyle designed the Beaux-Arts style building. The theatre became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1987, on its 80th birthday
2022/2020 – Royal Alexandra Theatre is located at 260 King St W in Toronto’s Entertainment District. Built in 1907, architect John McIntosh Lyle designed the Beaux-Arts style building. The theatre became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1987, on its 80th birthday

1953/2022 - Looking southwest towards the corner of Queen St W and York St in downtown Toronto. Today, the block is home to the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts and the Canadian Opera Company
1953/2022 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Queen St W and York St in downtown Toronto. Today, the block is home to the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts and the Canadian Opera Company (Toronto Public Library R-1098)

1972/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Parliament St and Gerrard St E in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto
1972/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Parliament St and Gerrard St E in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 32, Item 3)

May 11, 1983/2022 – Looking south towards Queen St W from the elevated walkway at Nathan Phillips Square and City Hall in downtown Toronto. The archive photo shows the Sheraton Centre Cinemas, once located at 123 Queen St W. On the marquee, “ET,” starring Henry Thomas, Drew Barrymore and Peter Coyote and “The King of Comedy,” starring Robert De Niro, Jerry Lewis and Diahnne Abbott, were playing and both released in 1982
May 11, 1983/2022 – Looking south towards Queen St W from the elevated walkway at Nathan Phillips Square and City Hall in downtown Toronto. The archive photo shows the Sheraton Centre Cinemas, once located at 123 Queen St W. On the marquee, “ET,” starring Henry Thomas, Drew Barrymore and Peter Coyote and “The King of Comedy,” starring Robert De Niro, Jerry Lewis and Diahnne Abbott, were playing and both released in 1982 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1526, File 76, Item 11)

January 2023/1955 - Looking southwest toward the tower that was once part of the former Yonge Street Fire Hall No. 3, later part of St Charles Tavern. It’s located on Yonge St, north of College St, between Grenville St and Grosvenor St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Built in the early 1870s, the hose tower was designed by architects James Grand and William Irving. The tower has been restored and is part of Halo Residences on Yonge Condo development
January 2023/1955 – Looking southwest toward the tower that was once part of the former Yonge Street Fire Hall No. 3, later part of St Charles Tavern. It’s located on Yonge St, north of College St, between Grenville St and Grosvenor St, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Built in the early 1870s, the hose tower was designed by architects James Grand and William Irving. The tower has been restored and is part of Halo Residences on Yonge Condo development (Toronto Public Library R-3759)

2009/2023 - The Constellation Hotel, later renamed the Regal Constellation Hotel, was once located at 900 Dixon Rd and Carlingview Dr on the northeast corner in the West Humber-Clairville area of Toronto. 

The Constellation opened its doors in 1962 with 150 rooms, dining areas, lounges, a swimming pool and more. Over the years, the hotel grew to a 900-guestroom convention facility. In the late 1980s, the hotel was renamed the Regal Constellation. The hotel closed in 2003 and, eight years later, was torn down. Today, the corner is home to Park’N Fly Airport Parking (2009 Google Maps)
2009/2023 – The Constellation Hotel, later renamed the Regal Constellation Hotel, was once located at 900 Dixon Rd and Carlingview Dr on the northeast corner in the West Humber-Clairville area of Toronto.

The Constellation opened its doors in 1962 with 150 rooms, dining areas, lounges, a swimming pool and more. Over the years, the hotel grew to a 900-guestroom convention facility. In the late 1980s, the hotel was renamed the Regal Constellation. The hotel closed in 2003 and, eight years later, was torn down. Today, the corner is home to Park’N Fly Airport Parking (2009 Google Maps)

1972/2023 - Looking northeast from Bay St and Queen St W towards the Old City Hall and Cenotaph in downtown Toronto. Notice Eaton’s store and the present-day CF Toronto Eaton Centre in the background
1972/2023 – Looking northeast from Bay St and Queen St W towards the Old City Hall and Cenotaph in downtown Toronto. Notice Eaton’s store and the present-day CF Toronto Eaton Centre in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 61, Item 2)

1972/2023 - Looking southeast from the corner of Richmond St E and Berkeley St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. In the distance is the former Christie, Brown & Company Stable. Today, the heritage-designated stable has been incorporated into the East United Condo at 95 Berkeley St
1972/2023 – Looking southeast from the corner of Richmond St E and Berkeley St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. In the distance is the former Christie, Brown & Company Stable. Today, the heritage-designated stable has been incorporated into the East United Condo at 95 Berkeley St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 21, Item 28)

1958/2023 - Looking north toward the storefronts on Bloor St W between Royal York Rd from Willingdon Blvd in The Kingsway neighbourhood of Toronto. In the archive photo, from left to right, are Canada Paint, New Kingsway Restaurant and Tamblyn Drugs on the corner
1958/2023 – Looking north toward the storefronts on Bloor St W between Royal York Rd from Willingdon Blvd in The Kingsway neighbourhood of Toronto. In the archive photo, from left to right, are Canada Paint, New Kingsway Restaurant and Tamblyn Drugs on the corner (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 7975)

1910/2023 - The Danforth Mennonite Church, originally known as Mennonite Gospel Mission, is located at 2174 Danforth Ave, east of Woodbine Ave on the north side in the East Danforth neighbourhood of Toronto. The small-frame structure was built in 1910 when the area was mainly farmland. The church received heritage status from the city in 2020
1910/2023 – The Danforth Mennonite Church, originally known as Mennonite Gospel Mission, is located at 2174 Danforth Ave, east of Woodbine Ave on the north side in the East Danforth neighbourhood of Toronto. The small-frame structure was built in 1910 when the area was mainly farmland. The church received heritage status from the city in 2020 (Mennonite Archives of Ontario CA MAO 1990-12 124)

1972/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Shuter St and Dalhousie St, in the Garden District of Toronto. The archive photo shows the Edward Cooper houses at 68 and 70 Shuter St and the Malcolm Gillespie houses at 64 to 66 Shuter St. Mr Cooper, a merchant, built his homes in 1850. Architect John Tully designed them in the Georgian Revival style. His family owned the houses for nearly seven decades. Mr Gillespie built his houses adjoining to the west in 1851. After he passed away in 1892, his widow added Romanesque Revival-style elements to the facades. 

The residences later became boarding houses, then in the 1970s, were extensively modified for commercial purposes. In 2014, the houses were dismantled. Today the heritage façades of Edward Cooper's houses were incorporated into the present-day condo tower
1972/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Shuter St and Dalhousie St, in the Garden District of Toronto. The archive photo shows the Edward Cooper houses at 68 and 70 Shuter St and the Malcolm Gillespie houses at 64 to 66 Shuter St. Mr Cooper, a merchant, built his homes in 1850. Architect John Tully designed them in the Georgian Revival style. His family owned the houses for nearly seven decades. Mr Gillespie built his houses adjoining to the west in 1851. After he passed away in 1892, his widow added Romanesque Revival-style elements to the facades.

The residences later became boarding houses, then in the 1970s, were extensively modified for commercial purposes. In 2014, the houses were dismantled. Today the heritage façades of Edward Cooper’s houses were incorporated into the present-day condo tower (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 27, Item 3)

1920s/2023 – Looking southwest towards Bloor St E and Church St in Toronto's Church-Wellesley neighbourhood. The archive photo shows the Westminster Presbyterian Church, later St Andrew’s United Church, once on Bloor St E
1920s/2023 – Looking southwest towards Bloor St E and Church St in Toronto’s Church-Wellesley neighbourhood. The archive photo shows the Westminster Presbyterian Church, later St Andrew’s United Church, once on Bloor St E (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 3237)

March 2, 1934/2023 – Looking east along Bloor St W from the corner of Sterling Rd, in the Junction Triangle neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice after nearly 90 years, the bus stop is still on the corner
March 2, 1934/2023 – Looking east along Bloor St W from the corner of Sterling Rd, in the Junction Triangle neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice after nearly 90 years, the bus stop is still on the corner (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 10161)

Between 1906-10/2021 - Looking northeast towards Bloor St W and Varsity Field at the University of Toronto. In 1898, the university opened the field for athletics, and in 1911, the first stadium was built. It was demolished in 2002 due to maintenance costs. In 2007, Varsity Centre opened and features a stadium, arena and pavilion. In the archive photo, notice the spectators at the north end of the field and the homes that once lined Bloor St W
Between 1906-10/2021 – Looking northeast towards Bloor St W and Varsity Field at the University of Toronto. In 1898, the university opened the field for athletics, and in 1911, the first stadium was built. It was demolished in 2002 due to maintenance costs. In 2007, Varsity Centre opened and features a stadium, arena and pavilion. In the archive photo, notice the spectators at the north end of the field and the homes that once lined Bloor St W (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 528)

1930/2023 – Maple Leaf Stadium was once located between Bathurst St and the appropriately named Stadium Rd, south of Lake Shore Blvd W in the Bathurst Quay neighbourhood of Toronto. The stadium was built in 1926 and was home to the minor league Maple Leafs baseball team. The archive photo is looking south towards the entrance. Today, the land is part residential and home to Little Norway Park as well as a gas station
1930/2023 – Maple Leaf Stadium was once located between Bathurst St and the appropriately named Stadium Rd, south of Lake Shore Blvd W in the Bathurst Quay neighbourhood of Toronto. The stadium was built in 1926 and was home to the minor league Maple Leafs baseball team. The archive photo is looking south towards the entrance. Today, the land is part residential and home to Little Norway Park as well as a gas station (Library and Archives Canada PA-098369)

Circa 1895/2023 – Looking east on Front St W from just west of Simcoe St in downtown Toronto. In the archive photo on the left is the Grand Union Hotel. It was later known as the Carls-Rite, then Barclay Hotel. The hotel was demolished in 1965, the site became a parking lot for several decades and in 2019, construction began on a 46-storey office tower. 

In the archive photo on the right are the Daly House and the old Union Station (the building with the tower). Those buildings have since been torn down, and the Canadian National Express Building stands on the site
Circa 1895/2023 – Looking east on Front St W from just west of Simcoe St in downtown Toronto. In the archive photo on the left is the Grand Union Hotel. It was later known as the Carls-Rite, then Barclay Hotel. The hotel was demolished in 1965, the site became a parking lot for several decades and in 2019, construction began on a 46-storey office tower.

In the archive photo on the right are the Daly House and the old Union Station (the building with the tower). Those buildings have since been torn down, and the Canadian National Express Building stands on the site (Toronto Public Library E9-91)

Circa 1950/2020 - The Donnybrook Ruin at the Riverdale Farm in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. It was once a two-storey structure; however, all that stands today are the tower and first floor. The archive photo shows when the park was home to the Riverdale Zoo
Circa 1950/2020 – The Donnybrook Ruin at the Riverdale Farm in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. It was once a two-storey structure; however, all that stands today are the tower and first floor. The archive photo shows when the park was home to the Riverdale Zoo (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 380, Item 149)

2023/1910 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Grandstand bench is located on the north side of BMO Field. The bench shows the third version of the Grandstand, built in 1906 but destroyed by fire in 1946. The fourth Grandstand was completed in 1948 and replaced by BMO Field, which opened in 2007
2023/1910 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Grandstand bench is located on the north side of BMO Field. The bench shows the third version of the Grandstand, built in 1906 but destroyed by fire in 1946. The fourth Grandstand was completed in 1948 and replaced by BMO Field, which opened in 2007 (CNE Archives)

1979/2023 – Looking north up Roncesvalles Ave from the intersection of Queen St W, King St W and The Queensway straddling the borders of Parkdale and Sunnyside neighbourhoods of Toronto. The archive photo shows the Edgewater Hotel on the left. The hotel opened in 1939, featuring over 40 guestrooms and nightly entertainment. In the mid-1990s, the hotel was renamed the Royal Princess. It later became a Days Inn, and in 2009 the iconic "Edgewater" neon sign was removed due to deterioration. The hotel then became Howard Johnson's, and since 2020, it's been home to Hotel Shelter in partnership with the City of Toronto
1979/2023 – Looking north up Roncesvalles Ave from the intersection of Queen St W, King St W and The Queensway straddling the borders of Parkdale and Sunnyside neighbourhoods of Toronto. The archive photo shows the Edgewater Hotel on the left. The hotel opened in 1939, featuring over 40 guestrooms and nightly entertainment. In the mid-1990s, the hotel was renamed the Royal Princess. It later became a Days Inn, and in 2009 the iconic “Edgewater” neon sign was removed due to deterioration. The hotel then became Howard Johnson’s, and since 2020, it’s been home to Hotel Shelter in partnership with the City of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 72, Item 90)

Circa 1991/2023 – Looking north towards The Kingsway Theatre located at ‪3030 Bloor St W, just west of Royal York Rd in The Kingsway neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1939, the Art Deco-style theatre received heritage status in 2008
Circa 1991/2023 – Looking north towards The Kingsway Theatre located at ‪3030 Bloor St W, just west of Royal York Rd in The Kingsway neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1939, the Art Deco-style theatre received heritage status in 2008 (City of Toronto Archives, Ken Webster Fonds 251, Series 1278, File 95)

1972/2023 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Adelaide St E and Parliament St, in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto. Once upon a time, Adelaide St E between Jarvis St and Parliament St was known as Duke St
1972/2023 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Adelaide St E and Parliament St, in the Corktown neighbourhood of Toronto. Once upon a time, Adelaide St E between Jarvis St and Parliament St was known as Duke St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 16, Item 24)

December 1923/January 2023 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Bloor St W, in the Bay-Cloverhill and Yorkville neighbourhoods of Toronto. The archive photo shows Stollery's menswear store once occupied Canada's most desired corner. Today, The One condo tower is being constructed at the site, which has an address of 1 Bloor St W. When the 94-storey skyscraper is completed, it will be the tallest building in Canada at 338 m. The previous record-holder was First Canadian Place at 298 m (355 m to the tip), a record the building has held since 1975
December 1923/January 2023 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Yonge St and Bloor St W, in the Bay-Cloverhill and Yorkville neighbourhoods of Toronto. The archive photo shows Stollery’s menswear store once occupied Canada’s most desired corner. Today, The One condo tower is being constructed at the site, which has an address of 1 Bloor St W. When the 94-storey skyscraper is completed, it will be the tallest building in Canada at 338 m. The previous record-holder was First Canadian Place at 298 m (355 m to the tip), a record the building has held since 1975 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 2089)

February 11, 1935/2022 – Looking northwest along University Ave, north of Adelaide St W, towards the Canada Life Assurance Company Building in downtown Toronto. The Beaux-Arts style building was constructed between 1929 to 1931 and designed by prominent Toronto architects, Sproatt & Rolph. In 1951, the insurance company added a weather beacon. It was the talk of the town. In 2019 and after 68 years, the beacon got its first update and switched to LED bulbs – 1,004 of them
February 11, 1935/2022 – Looking northwest along University Ave, north of Adelaide St W, towards the Canada Life Assurance Company Building in downtown Toronto. The Beaux-Arts style building was constructed between 1929 to 1931 and designed by prominent Toronto architects, Sproatt & Rolph. In 1951, the insurance company added a weather beacon. It was the talk of the town. In 2019 and after 68 years, the beacon got its first update and switched to LED bulbs – 1,004 of them (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 1663)

Circa 1930/2022 – Looking northwest towards the Canada Life Building from the grounds of Osgoode Hall in downtown Toronto. The archive photo shows the Canada Life Building nearing completion. The Beaux-Arts style building was designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph and received heritage status from the city in 1973
Circa 1930/2022 – Looking northwest towards the Canada Life Building from the grounds of Osgoode Hall in downtown Toronto. The archive photo shows the Canada Life Building nearing completion. The Beaux-Arts style building was designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph and received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 3026)

1954/1955/2021 - Looking northwest toward the corner of Dufferin St and Lawrence Ave W in the Yorkdale area of Toronto. Once home to farmland, by 1955, the Shell gas station and the former Conroy Hotel had been built on the corner
1954/1955/2021 – Looking northwest toward the corner of Dufferin St and Lawrence Ave W in the Yorkdale area of Toronto. Once home to farmland, by 1955, the Shell gas station and the former Conroy Hotel had been built on the corner (Toronto Public Library R-6376 & City of Toronto Archives, Series 65, File 148, Item 21)

1954/2021 - Looking northwest toward the corner of Dufferin St and Lawrence Ave W in Toronto’s Yorkdale area
1954/2021 – Looking northwest toward the corner of Dufferin St and Lawrence Ave W in Toronto’s Yorkdale area (Toronto Public Library R-6376)

2023/1978-87 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Grandstand bench is located on the north side of BMO Field. While the bench shows the third version of the Grandstand, built in 1906 and later destroyed by fire in 1946, the archive photo shows the fourth Grandstand. It was completed in 1948 and replaced by BMO Field, which opened in 2007
2023/1978-87 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Grandstand bench is located on the north side of BMO Field. While the bench shows the third version of the Grandstand, built in 1906 and later destroyed by fire in 1946, the archive photo shows the fourth Grandstand. It was completed in 1948 and replaced by BMO Field, which opened in 2007 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 363, Item 12)

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