Past & Present – Part 25

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1975/2022 - Osgoode Hall is located at 130 Queen St W‬ and University Ave, on the northeast corner. Construction began on the East Wing of Osgoode Hall in 1829, and through the years, there have been various additions, including the West Wing and Centre Building. In the background is the Canada Life Building, located at ‪330 University Ave, just north of Queen St W. Completed in 1931, architects, Sproatt & Rolph designed the historic second-generation skyscraper. In 1973, both downtown properties received heritage status from the city
1975/2022 – Osgoode Hall is located at 130 Queen St W‬ and University Ave, on the northeast corner. Construction began on the East Wing of Osgoode Hall in 1829, and through the years, there have been various additions, including the West Wing and Centre Building. In the background is the Canada Life Building, located at ‪330 University Ave, just north of Queen St W. Completed in 1931, architects, Sproatt & Rolph designed the historic second-generation skyscraper. In 1973, both downtown properties received heritage status from the city (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 14, Item 14)

1911/1970 – Couples enjoying a day out at the Canadian National Exhibition. The woman is wearing a tea dress and fancy hat while the man is in a 3-piece suit wearing a straw boater hat. Later, CNE fashion changed to T-shirts, short-shorts and striped tube socks
1911/1970 – Couples enjoying a day out at the Canadian National Exhibition. The woman is wearing a tea dress and fancy hat while the man is in a 3-piece suit wearing a straw boater hat. Later, CNE fashion changed to T-shirts, short-shorts and striped tube socks (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 1876 & CNE Archives)

January 3, 1924/2022 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Bloor St E in the Church-Wellesley neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the Imperial Bank of Commerce along with shops, including Robbins Haberdashery, Wiancko Bros Stationers and Laura Secord Confections. Notice the officer directing traffic at the intersection. Today, the corner is home to One Bloor, a 76-storey mixed-use skyscraper
January 3, 1924/2022 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Bloor St E in the Church-Wellesley neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the Imperial Bank of Commerce along with shops, including Robbins Haberdashery, Wiancko Bros Stationers and Laura Secord Confections. Notice the officer directing traffic at the intersection. Today, the corner is home to One Bloor, a 76-storey mixed-use skyscraper (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 2175)

1903/2022 – Looking north on Yonge St from Temperance St in downtown Toronto. Notice the Dineen Building on the left. It was built in 1897 for the Dineen Company, a hat and fur manufacturer. Architect Frederick Henry Herbert designed the building in the Renaissance Revival style. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1973. Today it’s home to the Dineen Coffee Co. The Confederation Life Building is just up the street on the right at Yonge St and Richmond St E. Constructed between 1890 and 1893, it was home to Confederation Life Association until 1955. In 1981, a fire roared through the heritage building while being renovated. It has since been restored, and today is home to shops, restaurants, businesses and medical offices
1903/2022 – Looking north on Yonge St from Temperance St in downtown Toronto. Notice the Dineen Building on the left. It was built in 1897 for the Dineen Company, a hat and fur manufacturer. Architect Frederick Henry Herbert designed the building in the Renaissance Revival style. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1973. Today it’s home to the Dineen Coffee Co.

The Confederation Life Building is just up the street on the right at Yonge St and Richmond St E. Constructed between 1890 and 1893, it was home to Confederation Life Association until 1955. In 1981, a fire roared through the heritage building while being renovated. It has since been restored, and today is home to shops, restaurants, businesses and medical offices (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1568, Item 311)

March 2021/April 2023 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Yorkville Ave and Avenue Rd, in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto
March 2021/April 2023 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Yorkville Ave and Avenue Rd, in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto

2022/April 22, 1971 – 100 Adelaide St E is located between Church St and Jarvis St in front of St James Park in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. The building was once home to Dominion Typewriters, and today, Pearl Diver Restaurant occupies the storefront
2022/April 22, 1971 – 100 Adelaide St E is located between Church St and Jarvis St in front of St James Park in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. The building was once home to Dominion Typewriters, and today, Pearl Diver Restaurant occupies the storefront (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 615, Item 14)

1972/January 2023 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Adelaide St E and Princess St, in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the corner was once home to the Toronto Electric Co, and also notice the Oldsmobile Cutlass parked on the right. The white house and building next to it have since been torn down
1972/January 2023 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Adelaide St E and Princess St, in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the corner was once home to the Toronto Electric Co, and also notice the Oldsmobile Cutlass parked on the right. The white house and building next to it have since been torn down (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 38, Item 6)

1930/2023 - Tip Top Tailors building is located at 637 Lake Shore Blvd W, just west of Bathurst St, in the Bathurst Quay neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1929, architect Roy H Bishop was commissioned by David Dunkelman, founder of Tip Top Tailors, to design the structure for the men's clothing company's headquarters, factory and warehouse. 

The Art Deco-style building received heritage status from the city in 1973. In the early-2000s, the building was converted to Tip Top Lofts, and an additional five storeys made of industrial frame and glass was added to the top. The archive photo shows the construction of the streetcar line with the former Maple Leaf Stadium in the background
1930/2023 – Tip Top Tailors building is located at 637 Lake Shore Blvd W, just west of Bathurst St, in the Bathurst Quay neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1929, architect Roy H Bishop was commissioned by David Dunkelman, founder of Tip Top Tailors, to design the structure for the men’s clothing company’s headquarters, factory and warehouse.

The Art Deco-style building received heritage status from the city in 1973. In the early-2000s, the building was converted to Tip Top Lofts, and an additional five storeys made of industrial frame and glass was added to the top. The archive photo shows the construction of the streetcar line with the former Maple Leaf Stadium in the background (Toronto Public Library R-2845)

1978/June 19, 2021 - Looking northeast from the corner of Elizabeth St and Hagerman St, behind new City Hall, in downtown Toronto. The archive photo shows when Nanking Restaurant & Tavern, “Famous Chinese Cuisine,” occupied the building. The restaurant was in business from 1947 until 1979
1978/June 19, 2021 – Looking northeast from the corner of Elizabeth St and Hagerman St, behind new City Hall, in downtown Toronto. The archive photo shows when Nanking Restaurant & Tavern, “Famous Chinese Cuisine,” occupied the building. The restaurant was in business from 1947 until 1979 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 299, Item 48)

1980-90s/2021 - Tip Top Tailors building is located at 637 Lake Shore Blvd W, just west of Bathurst St, in the Bathurst Quay neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1929, architect Roy H Bishop was commissioned by David Dunkelman, founder of Tip Top Tailors, to design the structure for the men's clothing company's headquarters, factory and warehouse. 

The Art Deco-style building received heritage status from the city in 1973. In the early-2000s, the building was converted to Tip Top Lofts, and an additional five storeys made of industrial frame and glass was added to the top. The archive photo shows the Joy Gas Station on the east side of the building
1980-90s/2021 – Tip Top Tailors building is located at 637 Lake Shore Blvd W, just west of Bathurst St, in the Bathurst Quay neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1929, architect Roy H Bishop was commissioned by David Dunkelman, founder of Tip Top Tailors, to design the structure for the men’s clothing company’s headquarters, factory and warehouse.

The Art Deco-style building received heritage status from the city in 1973. In the early-2000s, the building was converted to Tip Top Lofts, and an additional five storeys made of industrial frame and glass was added to the top. The archive photo shows the Joy Gas Station on the east side of the building (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 144, Item 25)

1972/2023 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Jarvis St and Isabella St, in Toronto’s Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. Built in 1875 by clothing manufacturer William R Johnston, architects Langley, Langley & Burke designed the mansion. The building received heritage status from the city in 1984. The property was redeveloped by Casey House, and today is a specialty hospital in Toronto that cares for people living with and at risk of HIV
1972/2023 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Jarvis St and Isabella St, in Toronto’s Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. Built in 1875 by clothing manufacturer William R Johnston, architects Langley, Langley & Burke designed the mansion. The building received heritage status from the city in 1984. The property was redeveloped by Casey House, and today is a specialty hospital in Toronto that cares for people living with and at risk of HIV (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 3, Item 16)

2022/1930s – Looking southeast towards the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building at 25 King St W, between Bay St and Yonge St in Toronto's Financial District. The graceful 34-storey building with its Romanesque Revival style detailing was built between 1929 to 1931. Designed by Toronto-based architect John Pearson (of Darling & Pearson) and New York City's leading bank architect firm York & Sawyer. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973
2022/1930s – Looking southeast towards the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building at 25 King St W, between Bay St and Yonge St in Toronto’s Financial District. The graceful 34-storey building with its Romanesque Revival style detailing was built between 1929 to 1931. Designed by Toronto-based architect John Pearson (of Darling & Pearson) and New York City’s leading bank architect firm York & Sawyer. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 409)

1972/2023 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Jarvis St and Isabella St, in Toronto’s Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. The corner was once home to a Sunoco gas station, and today, Rogers Communications Inc occupies the site
1972/2023 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Jarvis St and Isabella St, in Toronto’s Upper Jarvis neighbourhood. The corner was once home to a Sunoco gas station, and today, Rogers Communications Inc occupies the site (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 3, Item 15)

Circa 1927/2022 – Looking down York St from behind the fence at Osgoode Hall at 130 Queen St W in downtown Toronto. Designed by architect William Storm in 1866, the fence, known for its "cow gates," was given heritage status by the city in 1973
Circa 1927/2022 – Looking down York St from behind the fence at Osgoode Hall at 130 Queen St W in downtown Toronto. Designed by architect William Storm in 1866, the fence, known for its “cow gates,” was given heritage status by the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 7182)

1940s/2022 - Looking southeast towards what's known today as Commerce Court at the corner of King St W and Bay St in the Financial District of Toronto. Notice in the archive photo the former Toronto Telegram building on the far right and, in both images, the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building on the left. The intersection of King St W and Bay St was once known as the "MINT" corner. It was an acronym for the banks that stood there: Montreal Bank, Imperial Bank, Nova Scotia Bank, and Toronto Bank
1940s/2022 – Looking southeast towards what’s known today as Commerce Court at the corner of King St W and Bay St in the Financial District of Toronto. Notice in the archive photo the former Toronto Telegram building on the far right and, in both images, the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building on the left. The intersection of King St W and Bay St was once known as the “MINT” corner. It was an acronym for the banks that stood there: Montreal Bank, Imperial Bank, Nova Scotia Bank, and Toronto Bank (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 410)

1972/1914 – One of Toronto's public underground lavatories was once located at the southeast corner of Broadview Ave and Queen St E in the Riverside neighbourhood from 1910 until the early 1980s. In the archive photo dated 1914, notice the ventilation pipes on either side of the entrances also served as street lights. Also, notice the horse trough and the first Dominion Bank once stood at the corner
1972/1914 – One of Toronto’s public underground lavatories was once located at the southeast corner of Broadview Ave and Queen St E in the Riverside neighbourhood from 1910 until the early 1980s. In the archive photo dated 1914, notice the ventilation pipes on either side of the entrances also served as street lights. Also, notice the horse trough and the first Dominion Bank once stood at the corner (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 25, Item 20 & Fonds 1231, Item 648)

Circa 1900 - Toronto's first public underground lavatory was once located at Toronto St and Adelaide St E in the St Lawrence neighbourhood. Built in 1896, the men-only lavatory was accessed through a one-storey tower located directly in the middle of Toronto St. Inside the underground public restroom men-only washroom had four urinals, three stalls and a sink. An attendant on duty provided use of the sink, soap and a towel for 3¢ or a boot cleaning for 5¢, as noted in the sign above the sink
Circa 1900 – Toronto’s first public underground lavatory was once located at Toronto St and Adelaide St E in the St Lawrence neighbourhood. Built in 1896, the men-only lavatory was accessed through a one-storey tower located directly in the middle of Toronto St. Inside the underground public restroom men-only washroom had four urinals, three stalls and a sink. An attendant on duty provided use of the sink, soap and a towel for 3¢ or a boot cleaning for 5¢, as noted in the sign above the sink (Toronto Public Library R-5935 & City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 376, File 1, Item 90a)

Circa 1906 – Toronto's second public underground lavatory was once located at Spadina Ave and Queen St W in what we know today as the Fashion District. Opening in 1906, the men-only bathroom was accessed through a stairway in a median on Spadina Ave. The interior photo shows the wall-mounted high tank in each stall and over the urinals. In the 1930s, there were calls to close the underground lavatory as it was considered "a traffic menace"
Circa 1906 – Toronto’s second public underground lavatory was once located at Spadina Ave and Queen St W in what we know today as the Fashion District. Opening in 1906, the men-only bathroom was accessed through a stairway in a median on Spadina Ave. The interior photo shows the wall-mounted high tank in each stall and over the urinals. In the 1930s, there were calls to close the underground lavatory as it was considered “a traffic menace” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 200, Series 376, File 6, Item 84 & Series 376, File 5, Item 85)

May 26, 1920/2021 – Looking south toward the former public lavatory on Danforth Ave, just west of Broadview Ave in the North Riverdale neighbourhood of Toronto. Completed in 1920, city architect George FW Price designed the 1½ storey brick-clad building to complement the area. The local landmark is no longer a lavatory and has been adapted for use as a school. The building received heritage status from the city in 1984
May 26, 1920/2021 – Looking south toward the former public lavatory on Danforth Ave, just west of Broadview Ave in the North Riverdale neighbourhood of Toronto. Completed in 1920, city architect George FW Price designed the 1½ storey brick-clad building to complement the area. The local landmark is no longer a lavatory and has been adapted for use as a school. The building received heritage status from the city in 1984 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 1, Item 333)

Between 1974-84/2022 – Formerly the Pembroke Hotel, today Pembroke Inn is located at 117 Pembroke St in the Garden District of Toronto. The Victorian-style house received heritage status from the city in 2021
Between 1974-84/2022 – Formerly the Pembroke Hotel, today Pembroke Inn is located at 117 Pembroke St in the Garden District of Toronto. The Victorian-style house received heritage status from the city in 2021 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 626, Item 29)

1972/2022 - Looking southwest towards the corner of Queen St E at Power St, in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood
1972/2022 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Queen St E at Power St, in Toronto’s Corktown neighbourhood (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 11, Item 30)

1979-84/2022 – Looking south from Yonge St and Grenville St in Toronto’s Downtown Yonge area. In both photos, notice Oddfellows Hall, the red brick building with the corner towers originally home to the International Order of Oddfellows or IOOF. In the background, also notice Eatons College Street Store, today known as College Park
1979-84/2022 – Looking south from Yonge St and Grenville St in Toronto’s Downtown Yonge area. In both photos, notice Oddfellows Hall, the red brick building with the corner towers originally home to the International Order of Oddfellows or IOOF. In the background, also notice Eatons College Street Store, today known as College Park (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 613, Item 22)

March 23, 1948/2022 – Looking east on Wellesley St E from Sherbourne St in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. In both photos on the right, notice the Ernescliffe Apartments. Built in 1916, the Edwardian Classical style buildings were designed by architects Redmon & Beggs. The apartments were once one of the largest in the city. In the archive photo, the street had not yet been widened. Also, notice on the left, the corner was once home to the Hambourg Conservatory of Music. Today it's the site of the St James Town branch of the Toronto Public Library
March 23, 1948/2022 – Looking east on Wellesley St E from Sherbourne St in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. In both photos on the right, notice the Ernescliffe Apartments. Built in 1916, the Edwardian Classical style buildings were designed by architects Redmon & Beggs. The apartments were once one of the largest in the city. In the archive photo, the street had not yet been widened. Also, notice on the left, the corner was once home to the Hambourg Conservatory of Music. Today it’s the site of the St James Town branch of the Toronto Public Library (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 1767)

1972/2022 – Looking west along Wellesley Ln (today known as Lourdes Ln) from Sherbourne St in the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood of Toronto. On the right side is the east portico of Our Lady of Lourdes Church, and the archive photo shows the building on the left is the rear of the former Wellesley Hospital
1972/2022 – Looking west along Wellesley Ln (today known as Lourdes Ln) from Sherbourne St in the Upper Jarvis neighbourhood of Toronto. On the right side is the east portico of Our Lady of Lourdes Church, and the archive photo shows the building on the left is the rear of the former Wellesley Hospital (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 7, Item 11)

1954/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Wellesley St E and Jarvis St, in the Church-Wellesley neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the former Immanuel Baptist Church. Built in 1888/89, architects Smith & Gemmell designed the church in the early English style. The church was demolished in 1967 and replaced with the present-day residential building. Today Immanuel Baptist Church is located at 1100 Finch Ave E and, in 2016, celebrated 150 years of service
1954/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Wellesley St E and Jarvis St, in the Church-Wellesley neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the former Immanuel Baptist Church. Built in 1888/89, architects Smith & Gemmell designed the church in the early English style. The church was demolished in 1967 and replaced with the present-day residential building. Today Immanuel Baptist Church is located at 1100 Finch Ave E and, in 2016, celebrated 150 years of service (Toronto Public Library R-501)

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