Past & Present – Part 24

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2022/Between 1920-26 – The Broadview Hotel at 106 Broadview Ave and Queen St E, in the Riverside neighbourhood. Built in 1891/92 as Dingman’s Hall, the Romanesque Revival style building was converted to The Broadview Hotel in 1907/08. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1975
2022/Between 1920-26 – The Broadview Hotel at 106 Broadview Ave and Queen St E, in the Riverside neighbourhood. Built in 1891/92 as Dingman’s Hall, the Romanesque Revival style building was converted to The Broadview Hotel in 1907/08. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1975 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 2515)

Between 1980-85/May 2022 – Looking east towards the corner of Yorkville Ave and Avenue Rd in Toronto's Yorkville neighbourhood
Between 1980-85/May 2022 – Looking east towards the corner of Yorkville Ave and Avenue Rd in Toronto’s Yorkville neighbourhood (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 340, Item 16)

2021/1962 - The Manulife Building is located at 200 Bloor St E in the Yorkville neighbourhood. Built from 1924 to 1925 and originally known as the Manufacturers Life Company Limited Building, it was designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph, with later additions by Marani & Morris. The building received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 1976
2021/1962 – The Manulife Building is located at 200 Bloor St E in the Yorkville neighbourhood. Built from 1924 to 1925 and originally known as the Manufacturers Life Company Limited Building, it was designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph, with later additions by Marani & Morris. The building received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 1976 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 8912)

1980-90s/2022 – Looking towards the southwest corner of Bellair St and Critchley Ln, just north of Bloor St W in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto. Once home to 4D’s Diner and later Flo’s Diner, the restaurant was demolished in the early 2000s to make way for the present-day mixed-use building. On Flo’s last day at that location in April 2000, as a thank you to customers, they celebrated with everyone dressed in 1950s clothing. Flo’s moved to 70 Yorkville Ave on the 2nd floor
1980-90s/2022 – Looking towards the southwest corner of Bellair St and Critchley Ln, just north of Bloor St W in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto. Once home to 4D’s Diner and later Flo’s Diner, the restaurant was demolished in the early 2000s to make way for the present-day mixed-use building. On Flo’s last day at that location in April 2000, as a thank you to customers, they celebrated with everyone dressed in 1950s clothing. Flo’s moved to 70 Yorkville Ave on the 2nd floor (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 43, Item 49)

April 10, 1971/2020 - Looking northeast from The Esplanade towards the south end of St Lawrence Market in Toronto. In the early 1970s, the market building narrowly escaped demolition thanks to a group of citizens who helped save the historic gem. Heritage designation was given in 1973
April 10, 1971/2020 – Looking northeast from The Esplanade towards the south end of St Lawrence Market in Toronto. In the early 1970s, the market building narrowly escaped demolition thanks to a group of citizens who helped save the historic gem. Heritage designation was given in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 16, Item 1)

1930/2021 – Tip Top Tailors building is located at 637 Lake Shore Blvd W, just west of Bathurst St, in the Bathurst Quay neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1929, architect Roy H Bishop was commissioned by David Dunkelman, founder of Tip Top Tailors, to design the structure for the men's clothing company's headquarters, factory and warehouse. 
The Art Deco-style building received heritage status from the city in 1973. In the early-2000s, the building was converted to Tip Top Lofts, and an additional five storeys made of industrial frame and glass was added to the top. The archive photo shows the construction of the streetcar line with the former Maple Leaf Stadium in the background
1930/2021 – Tip Top Tailors building is located at 637 Lake Shore Blvd W, just west of Bathurst St, in the Bathurst Quay neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1929, architect Roy H Bishop was commissioned by David Dunkelman, founder of Tip Top Tailors, to design the structure for the men’s clothing company’s headquarters, factory and warehouse.

The Art Deco-style building received heritage status from the city in 1973. In the early-2000s, the building was converted to Tip Top Lofts, and an additional five storeys made of industrial frame and glass was added to the top. The archive photo shows the construction of the streetcar line with the former Maple Leaf Stadium in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 21234)

1913/2020 – The Robbie Burns Monument is located at Allan Gardens in Toronto’s Garden District. Robbie Burns (1759-1796) was a Scottish poet and lyricist. His most famous work is thought to be “Auld Lang Syne”
1913/2020 – The Robbie Burns Monument is located at Allan Gardens in Toronto’s Garden District. Robbie Burns (1759-1796) was a Scottish poet and lyricist. His most famous work is thought to be “Auld Lang Syne” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1548, Series 393, Item 3134)

2022/1958 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Bloor St W and Royal York Rd in The Kingsway neighbourhood of Toronto. In the archive photo, notice the FW Woolworth Company store and, in both photos, the Bank of Montreal and the Kingsway Theatre on the left
2022/1958 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Bloor St W and Royal York Rd in The Kingsway neighbourhood of Toronto. In the archive photo, notice the FW Woolworth Company store and, in both photos, the Bank of Montreal and the Kingsway Theatre on the left (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 7964)

1950s/2023 – Looking east from Grange Rd towards McCaul St, where New Richmond Methodist Church and later McCaul Street Synagogue once stood at 65-69 McCaul St in downtown Toronto. The house of worship was torn down and replaced with the present-day residential buildings
1950s/2023 – Looking east from Grange Rd towards McCaul St, where New Richmond Methodist Church and later McCaul Street Synagogue once stood at 65-69 McCaul St in downtown Toronto. The house of worship was torn down and replaced with the present-day residential buildings (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 396)

1972/2022 – Looking southeast towards 113 Jarvis St at Richmond St E in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1832, it was the first official residence of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Upper Canada, Alexander Macdonell. His statue is located at St Mary's Church. The building received heritage status from the city in 1985. Today, Mystic Muffin (famous for its apple cake) occupies the storefront
1972/2022 – Looking southeast towards 113 Jarvis St at Richmond St E in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1832, it was the first official residence of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Upper Canada, Alexander Macdonell. His statue is located at St Mary’s Church. The building received heritage status from the city in 1985. Today, Mystic Muffin (famous for its apple cake) occupies the storefront (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 22, Item 13)

Circa 1900/2020 - Looking southwest towards Toronto's first public underground lavatory. It was on the south side of Adelaide St E, at the head of Toronto St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood. Built in 1896, the men-only lavatory was accessed through a one-storey tower located directly in the middle of Toronto St
Circa 1900/2020 – Looking southwest towards Toronto’s first public underground lavatory. It was on the south side of Adelaide St E, at the head of Toronto St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood. Built in 1896, the men-only lavatory was accessed through a one-storey tower located directly in the middle of Toronto St (Toronto Public Library R-5935)

1914/1972/2020 – One of Toronto's public underground lavatories was once located at the southeast corner of Broadview Ave and Queen St E in the Riverside neighbourhood from 1910 until the early 1980s. In the archive photo dated 1914, notice the ventilation pipes on either side of the entrances also served as street lights. Also, notice the horse trough and the first Dominion Bank once stood at the corner
1914/1972/2020 – One of Toronto’s public underground lavatories was once located at the southeast corner of Broadview Ave and Queen St E in the Riverside neighbourhood from 1910 until the early 1980s. In the archive photo dated 1914, notice the ventilation pipes on either side of the entrances also served as street lights. Also, notice the horse trough and the first Dominion Bank once stood at the corner (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 648 & Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 25, Item 20)

January 24, 1933/2022 – Looking northwest towards the former Oddfellows Hall located at 450 Yonge St and College St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. This historic building was built in 1891/92 and was home to the International Order of Oddfellows, or IOOF. Designed by architects Dick & Wickson, this four-storey landmark combines a few styles of architecture, including Gothic Revival and Chateau elements. The lower floors were used for shops and offices with Oddfellows Hall above. In 1931, the building was altered for the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. In 1974, the city gave this magnificent piece of architecture heritage status
January 24, 1933/2022 – Looking northwest towards the former Oddfellows Hall located at 450 Yonge St and College St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. This historic building was built in 1891/92 and was home to the International Order of Oddfellows, or IOOF. Designed by architects Dick & Wickson, this four-storey landmark combines a few styles of architecture, including Gothic Revival and Chateau elements. The lower floors were used for shops and offices with Oddfellows Hall above. In 1931, the building was altered for the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. In 1974, the city gave this magnificent piece of architecture heritage status (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 66, Item 52)

1885/2021 – Looking east from Jarvis St and Lombard St, just south of Richmond St E in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1832, it was the first official residence of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Upper Canada, Alexander Macdonell, until 1839. The building later went through various uses, and the archive photo shows it as the Pacific Hotel in the late 1800s. The building received heritage status from the city in 1985. Mystic Muffin, which is famous for its apple cake, occupies the storefront today
1885/2021 – Looking east from Jarvis St and Lombard St, just south of Richmond St E in the Old Town neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1832, it was the first official residence of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Upper Canada, Alexander Macdonell, until 1839. The building later went through various uses, and the archive photo shows it as the Pacific Hotel in the late 1800s. The building received heritage status from the city in 1985. Mystic Muffin, which is famous for its apple cake, occupies the storefront today (Toronto Public Library, R-2705)

Circa 1890/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Church St and Adelaide St E in Toronto's Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood. The building in the archive photo was originally constructed for the Mechanics' Institute in 1854/55 and designed by architects Cumberland & Storm. The Institute was established in 1830 to educate adults, mainly in technical subjects. It had a reference library and held classes and lectures. In 1882, the Free Libraries Act was passed, and the assets of Mechanics Institute were given to the local government. Its vast collection of books started the Toronto Public Library, which opened in the building in 1884. The grand structure was torn down in 1950, and today the site is home to a mixed-use building
Circa 1890/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Church St and Adelaide St E in Toronto’s Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood.

The building in the archive photo was originally constructed for the Mechanics’ Institute in 1854/55 and designed by architects Cumberland & Storm. The Institute was established in 1830 to educate adults, mainly in technical subjects. It had a reference library and held classes and lectures. In 1882, the Free Libraries Act was passed, and the assets of Mechanics Institute were given to the local government. Its vast collection of books started the Toronto Public Library, which opened in the building in 1884.

The grand structure was torn down in 1950, and today the site is home to a mixed-use building (Toronto Public Library R-5976)

Circa 1903/2022 – Looking southwest towards the Dominion Bank Building today, One King West Hotel & Residence at the corner of Yonge St and King St W, in Toronto's Financial District. The archive photo shows the original Dominion Bank building completed in 1879. It was replaced by the present-day building in 1913/14. Architects Darling & Pearson, assisted by engineers Harkness & Oxley, designed the 12-storey skyscraper in the Beaux-Arts style with Renaissance Revival elements. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 and became a residential structure in 2005
Circa 1903/2022 – Looking southwest towards the Dominion Bank Building today, One King West Hotel & Residence at the corner of Yonge St and King St W, in Toronto’s Financial District. The archive photo shows the original Dominion Bank building completed in 1879. It was replaced by the present-day building in 1913/14. Architects Darling & Pearson, assisted by engineers Harkness & Oxley, designed the 12-storey skyscraper in the Beaux-Arts style with Renaissance Revival elements. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 and became a residential structure in 2005 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1568, Item 368)

Circa 1921/2022 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Richmond St W and Maud St, in the Fashion District of Toronto. St Andrew’s Market, which once occupied the corner, is in the archive photo. In 1932, the market was torn down and replaced with the Water Works Building. The heritage-designated façade of the former Water Works Building is today incorporated into the new development
Circa 1921/2022 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Richmond St W and Maud St, in the Fashion District of Toronto. St Andrew’s Market, which once occupied the corner, is in the archive photo. In 1932, the market was torn down and replaced with the Water Works Building. The heritage-designated façade of the former Water Works Building is today incorporated into the new development (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 299)

1951/2022 - Looking southeast from Dundas St W and Abbott Ave towards the Wallace Avenue Footbridge. Built in 1907, the pedestrian bridge is between Wallace Ave and Dundas St W, joining the Junction Triangle and West Bend neighbourhoods. The bridge was supposed to be a temporary crossing until the railway underpasses at Bloor St W and Dupont St were completed in 1925. However, since it was so well used, the footbridge was never taken down and has become an area landmark
1951/2022 – Looking southeast from Dundas St W and Abbott Ave towards the Wallace Avenue Footbridge. Built in 1907, the pedestrian bridge is between Wallace Ave and Dundas St W, joining the Junction Triangle and West Bend neighbourhoods. The bridge was supposed to be a temporary crossing until the railway underpasses at Bloor St W and Dupont St were completed in 1925. However, since it was so well used, the footbridge was never taken down and has become an area landmark (Toronto Public Library R-2068)

2021/2022 - There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. This granite bench shows the north side of the Automotive Building, and it’s appropriately placed on the building’s north side, which is today known as the Beanfield Centre. Built in 1929, the Automotive Building was designed by architect Douglas Kertland. From 1929 until 1967, the auto show was the most popular event presented at the annual Canadian National Exhibition
2021/2022 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. This granite bench shows the north side of the Automotive Building, and it’s appropriately placed on the building’s north side, which is today known as the Beanfield Centre. Built in 1929, the Automotive Building was designed by architect Douglas Kertland. From 1929 until 1967, the auto show was the most popular event presented at the annual Canadian National Exhibition

August 22, 1929/2022 - There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. This granite bench shows the south side of the Automotive Building, and it's appropriately placed on the building's south side, today known as the Beanfield Centre. Built in 1929, the Automotive Building was designed by architect Douglas Kertland. From 1929 until 1967, the auto show was the most popular event presented at the annual CNE
August 22, 1929/2022 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. This granite bench shows the south side of the Automotive Building, and it’s appropriately placed on the building’s south side, today known as the Beanfield Centre. Built in 1929, the Automotive Building was designed by architect Douglas Kertland. From 1929 until 1967, the auto show was the most popular event presented at the annual CNE (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 17573)

2022/September 24, 1977 - There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Toronto Blue Jays bench is located at the southeast exterior of the Food Building. The Blue Jays played their first game at Exhibition Stadium against the Chicago White Sox on April 7, 1977, and won 9 to 5. In 1989, the Toronto Blue Jays moved to the SkyDome (Rogers Centre). The archive photo shows Toronto Blue Jays and Boston Red Sox playing at Exhibition Stadium on September 24, 1977
2022/September 24, 1977 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Toronto Blue Jays bench is located at the southeast exterior of the Food Building. The Blue Jays played their first game at Exhibition Stadium against the Chicago White Sox on April 7, 1977, and won 9 to 5. In 1989, the Toronto Blue Jays moved to the SkyDome (Rogers Centre). The archive photo shows Toronto Blue Jays and Boston Red Sox playing at Exhibition Stadium on September 24, 1977 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 95, Item 60)

2022/2022 - There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Toronto Blue Jays bench is located at the southeast exterior of the Food Building. The Blue Jays played their first game at Exhibition Stadium against the Chicago White Sox on April 7, 1977, and won 9 to 5. In 1989, the Toronto Blue Jays moved to the SkyDome (Rogers Centre). While BMO Field replaced Exhibition Stadium, there are plaques embedded in the parking lot showing the location of the former stadium's home plate and the bases
2022/2022 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Toronto Blue Jays bench is located at the southeast exterior of the Food Building. The Blue Jays played their first game at Exhibition Stadium against the Chicago White Sox on April 7, 1977, and won 9 to 5. In 1989, the Toronto Blue Jays moved to the SkyDome (Rogers Centre). While BMO Field replaced Exhibition Stadium, there are plaques embedded in the parking lot showing the location of the former stadium’s home plate and the bases

1920-30s/2023 - There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Bicycle Racing bench is located at the southeast exterior of the Food Building. Cycling came to the CNE in 1880, and annual competitions lasted until the 1970s
1920-30s/2023 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Bicycle Racing bench is located at the southeast exterior of the Food Building. Cycling came to the CNE in 1880, and annual competitions lasted until the 1970s (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 5727)

September 1, 1923/2023 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Harness Racing bench is located on the north side of BMO Field. Harness racing took place at Exhibition grounds from 1879 to 1938. It was where World Champion horse 'Dan Parch' broke the Canadian record in 1905
September 1, 1923/2023 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Harness Racing bench is located on the north side of BMO Field. Harness racing took place at Exhibition grounds from 1879 to 1938. It was where World Champion horse ‘Dan Parch’ broke the Canadian record in 1905 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 1405)

1926/2019 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Auto Sports Racing bench is temporarily in storage. Auto sports racing began at the Grandstand in 1913
1926/2019 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Auto Sports Racing bench is temporarily in storage. Auto sports racing began at the Grandstand in 1913 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 1399)

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