Past & Present – Part 23

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1892/2021 – Looking northeast towards The York Club, originally the George Gooderham House, located at 135 St George St and Bloor St W in The Annex neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1889/91, architect David Roberts Jr designed the mansion in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. It has been home to The York Club since approximately 1910 and was one of the 490 buildings on Heritage Toronto’s initial induction list in 1973
1892/2021 – Looking northeast towards The York Club, originally the George Gooderham House, located at 135 St George St and Bloor St W in The Annex neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1889/91, architect David Roberts Jr designed the mansion in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. It has been home to The York Club since approximately 1910 and was one of the 490 buildings on Heritage Toronto’s initial induction list in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 3049)

2019/1959 - Looking south toward Dufferin Gate near the foot of Dufferin St at Exhibition Place. The parabolic archway was designed by architect Arthur G Keith and is made with slender steel encased in concrete
2019/1959 – Looking south toward Dufferin Gate near the foot of Dufferin St at Exhibition Place. The parabolic archway was designed by architect Arthur G Keith and is made with slender steel encased in concrete (City of Toronto Archives, Series 65, File 58, Item 8)

2022/1915 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. Fort Rouillé bench, which shows an artist's impression of the Fort, is located at the southeast exterior of BMO Field. The Fort Rouillé Monument is on the south side of Exhibition Place, just east of the Scadding Cabin. The monument commemorates the early French trading post, built on the site in 1749 and burned down in 1759
2022/1915 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. Fort Rouillé bench, which shows an artist’s impression of the Fort, is located at the southeast exterior of BMO Field. The Fort Rouillé Monument is on the south side of Exhibition Place, just east of the Scadding Cabin. The monument commemorates the early French trading post, built on the site in 1749 and burned down in 1759 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1548, Series 393, Item 12462)

2021/1929 - Looking northwest along King St W,  towards Ed Mirvish Way (Duncan St), where Ed's Warehouse, Ed's Folly, Old Ed's and Ed's Seafood once occupied the buildings
2021/1929 – Looking northwest along King St W, towards Ed Mirvish Way (Duncan St), where Ed’s Warehouse, Ed’s Folly, Old Ed’s and Ed’s Seafood once occupied the buildings (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 3501)

1955/2021 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St W and Ossington Ave, in the Beaconsfield Village neighbourhood of Toronto. Once home to the Columbia Hotel, the building was taken down in 2009 and replaced with the present-day mixed-use structure
1955/2021 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St W and Ossington Ave, in the Beaconsfield Village neighbourhood of Toronto. Once home to the Columbia Hotel, the building was taken down in 2009 and replaced with the present-day mixed-use structure (Toronto Public Library R-6084)
2023/1969 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Toronto Argonauts bench is located at the southeast exterior of the Food Building. The Argonauts played at the Exhibition Stadium from 1959 to 1988. Notice the Flyer roller coaster in the background in the archive photo
2023/1969 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Toronto Argonauts bench is located at the southeast exterior of the Food Building. The Argonauts played at the Exhibition Stadium from 1959 to 1988. Notice the Flyer roller coaster in the background in the archive photo (CNE Archives)

2023/1972 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Flyer rollercoaster bench is located at the southeast exterior of BMO Field. The Flyer opened in 1953, and 9 million passengers rode the rollercoaster for over 39 years at the CNE Midway
2023/1972 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Flyer rollercoaster bench is located at the southeast exterior of BMO Field. The Flyer opened in 1953, and 9 million passengers rode the rollercoaster for over 39 years at the CNE Midway (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 94, Item 27)

2022/1960s – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Shell Oil Tower bench is located on the south side of the Beanfield Centre (Automotive Building). Shell Oil Tower was once located at Exhibition Place, near where Princes’ Blvd and Nunavut Rd intersect today. The tower was built in 1955 and designed by architect George Robb. It later became Bulova Tower and was dismantled in 1985
2022/1960s – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Shell Oil Tower bench is located on the south side of the Beanfield Centre (Automotive Building). Shell Oil Tower was once located at Exhibition Place, near where Princes’ Blvd and Nunavut Rd intersect today. The tower was built in 1955 and designed by architect George Robb. It later became Bulova Tower and was dismantled in 1985 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 150, Item 13)

2022/1946 - There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Bandshell bench is located at the southeast exterior of BMO Field. Built in 1936, architects Craig & Madill designed the open-air Art Deco-style concert venue. The Bandshell is located in Bandshell Park and received heritage status from the city in 1973
2022/1946 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Bandshell bench is located at the southeast exterior of BMO Field. Built in 1936, architects Craig & Madill designed the open-air Art Deco-style concert venue. The Bandshell is located in Bandshell Park and received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 2368)

1927/1972/2022 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Bloor St W at Balmuto St in the Yorkville/Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhoods of Toronto. Notice the Uptown and Backstage Theatre in both archive photos
1927/1972/2022 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Bloor St W at Balmuto St in the Yorkville/Bay-Cloverhill neighbourhoods of Toronto. Notice the Uptown and Backstage Theatre in both archive photos (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 3, Item 688 & Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 66, Item 23)

1939/2022 – Looking north up Yonge St, between King St and Adelaide in the bustling Financial District/St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows advertising for the Horse Show at the Coliseum in Exhibition Place. Notice in both images the Lumsden Building, built in 1909/10, on the right side halfway up
1939/2022 – Looking north up Yonge St, between King St and Adelaide in the bustling Financial District/St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows advertising for the Horse Show at the Coliseum in Exhibition Place. Notice in both images the Lumsden Building, built in 1909/10, on the right side halfway up (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 58)

2021/1979-81 - Looking northeast towards the Lumsden Building at the corner of Yonge St and Adelaide St E in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1909/10 and designed by architect J A MacKenzie, the building received heritage status from the city in 1973. The archive photo shows Studio 267 and Direct Film storefronts
2021/1979-81 – Looking northeast towards the Lumsden Building at the corner of Yonge St and Adelaide St E in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1909/10 and designed by architect J A MacKenzie, the building received heritage status from the city in 1973. The archive photo shows Studio 267 and Direct Film storefronts (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 614, Item 34)

1910/2022 - Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The row of buildings from 216-232 Queen St E was built in 1889, and 234-242 Queen St E, known as the Carlyle Block, was constructed in 1883. The group of buildings received heritage status from the city in 1973
1910/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The row of buildings from 216-232 Queen St E was built in 1889, and 234-242 Queen St E, known as the Carlyle Block, was constructed in 1883. The group of buildings received heritage status from the city in 1973 (Toronto Public Library R- 1217)

1910/1972/2022 - Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The row of buildings from 216-232 Queen St E was built in 1889, and 234-242 Queen St E, known as the Carlyle Block, was constructed in 1883. The group of buildings received heritage status from the city in 1973
1910/1972/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The row of buildings from 216-232 Queen St E was built in 1889, and 234-242 Queen St E, known as the Carlyle Block, was constructed in 1883. The group of buildings received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 50, Item 22 & Toronto Public Library R- 1217)

Between 1980-98/2022 - Looking northwest toward 234-242 Queen St E, known as the Carlyle Block, between Sherbourne St and Berkeley St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1892/93 by contractors David and William Carlyle, the group of buildings received heritage status from the city in 1973
Between 1980-98/2022 – Looking northwest toward 234-242 Queen St E, known as the Carlyle Block, between Sherbourne St and Berkeley St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1892/93 by contractors David and William Carlyle, the group of buildings received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 172, ID 9)

1919/2022 – The Christie Mansion is located at 100 Wellesley St in Toronto. With his fortunes from Christie, Brown & Company, William Christie hired architects Gordon & Helliwell to design the late Victorian-style home. It was built in 1881 in the posh Queen's Park neighbourhood. The mansion received heritage status from the city in 1976. The famous Canadian businessman helped found the Toronto Industrial Exhibition, today's Canadian National Exhibition
1919/2022 – The Christie Mansion is located at 100 Wellesley St in Toronto. With his fortunes from Christie, Brown & Company, William Christie hired architects Gordon & Helliwell to design the late Victorian-style home. It was built in 1881 in the posh Queen’s Park neighbourhood. The mansion received heritage status from the city in 1976. The famous Canadian businessman helped found the Toronto Industrial Exhibition, today’s Canadian National Exhibition (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 56, Item 4)

1979/2022 - Looking southeast from new City Hall and Nathan Phillips Square towards Old City Hall in downtown Toronto. The archive photo shows the Archer statue
1979/2022 – Looking southeast from new City Hall and Nathan Phillips Square towards Old City Hall in downtown Toronto. The archive photo shows the Archer statue (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 13, Item 74)

1937/2021 – Looking northeast from the corner of Elizabeth St and Hagerman St behind the City Hall in downtown Toronto. Notice the Hotel Ford in the background. It stood at the northeast corner of Bay St and Dundas St W until the mid-1970s W
1937/2021 – Looking northeast from the corner of Elizabeth St and Hagerman St behind the City Hall in downtown Toronto. Notice the Hotel Ford in the background. It stood at the northeast corner of Bay St and Dundas St W until the mid-1970s W (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 33, Item 159)

1913/2022 - Looking northeast towards Old City Hall and York County Court House, serving today as an Ontario Court of Justice courthouse, located at 60 Queen St W in downtown Toronto. Construction began in 1889, and after many delays, it was completed a decade later. Architect Edward James Lennox designed the Richardson Romanesque-style building. In 1965, the building became a dedicated courthouse when the new Toronto City Hall opened. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973
1913/2022 – Looking northeast towards Old City Hall and York County Court House, serving today as an Ontario Court of Justice courthouse, located at 60 Queen St W in downtown Toronto. Construction began in 1889, and after many delays, it was completed a decade later. Architect Edward James Lennox designed the Richardson Romanesque-style building. In 1965, the building became a dedicated courthouse when the new Toronto City Hall opened. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 32, Item 187)

Circa 1888/2022 - The American Hotel stood on the northeast corner of Yonge St and Front St E in downtown Toronto from about 1844 until 1889. It was replaced by the former Board of Trade Building, which was demolished in 1958. The site later became a parking lot and, since 1982, has been home to a mirrored office building. In the present-day photo, notice the Hockey Hall of Fame on the left and the Gooderham Building in the distance on the right
Circa 1888/2022 – The American Hotel stood on the northeast corner of Yonge St and Front St E in downtown Toronto from about 1844 until 1889. It was replaced by the former Board of Trade Building, which was demolished in 1958. The site later became a parking lot and, since 1982, has been home to a mirrored office building. In the present-day photo, notice the Hockey Hall of Fame on the left and the Gooderham Building in the distance on the right (Toronto Public Library R-6698)

1891/2023 – Originally the Lakeview Hotel, later the Winchester Hotel & Hall, located at 531-537 Parliament St and Winchester St on the southeast corner in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1888, architects Kennedy & Holland designed the Second-Empire-style hotel. The building received heritage status from the city in 1975
1891/2023 – Originally the Lakeview Hotel, later the Winchester Hotel & Hall, located at 531-537 Parliament St and Winchester St on the southeast corner in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1888, architects Kennedy & Holland designed the Second-Empire-style hotel. The building received heritage status from the city in 1975 (Toronto: Old and New 1891 book by Adam G Mercer)

2012/2023 – The façade of the building once home to Silver Snail Comics at 367 Queen St W in the Entertainment District of Toronto has been preserved and incorporated into the new building at 365 Queen St W
2012/2023 – The façade of the building once home to Silver Snail Comics at 367 Queen St W in the Entertainment District of Toronto has been preserved and incorporated into the new building at 365 Queen St W (photo on the left courtesy of Google Maps)

1920-26/2022 – Looking southeast towards Yonge St and Maitland St from Breadalbane St in Toronto’s Church-Wellesley neighbourhood. Notice in the archive photo the Brier billboard advertisement, which reads “Everywhere! BRIER The tobacco with a heart”
1920-26/2022 – Looking southeast towards Yonge St and Maitland St from Breadalbane St in Toronto’s Church-Wellesley neighbourhood. Notice in the archive photo the Brier billboard advertisement, which reads “Everywhere! BRIER The tobacco with a heart” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 2199)

Between 1920-26/2023 – Looking south on Yonge St from Maitland St in downtown Toronto. Notice the St Charles Tower in both photos, about halfway down on the right
Between 1920-26/2023 – Looking south on Yonge St from Maitland St in downtown Toronto. Notice the St Charles Tower in both photos, about halfway down on the right (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 2176)

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