Past & Present – Part 22

2022/1931 - There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Princes' Gates bench is located on the north side of the Beanfield Centre (Automotive Building). The Princes' Gates was renamed after Edward, Prince of Wales, and his brother, Prince George, Duke of Kent. Both brothers attended the official opening of the Canadian National Exhibition on August 30, 1927
2022/1931 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. The Princes’ Gates bench is located on the north side of the Beanfield Centre (Automotive Building). The Princes’ Gates was renamed after Edward, Prince of Wales, and his brother, Prince George, Duke of Kent. Both brothers attended the official opening of the Canadian National Exhibition on August 30, 1927 (Library and Archives Canada a052988)

2022/1890s - There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. One of the benches, the Crystal Palace, is located at the southeast exterior of BMO Field. The Crystal Palace was built in 1858 and originally located near King St W and Shaw St. In 1878, the building was dismantled and moved to Exhibition grounds, where it was enlarged. The Crystal Palace stood there until 1906 when it was destroyed by fire. Today, the Horticulture Building occupies the site (CNE Archives)
2022/1890s – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. One of the benches, the Crystal Palace, is located at the southeast exterior of BMO Field. The Crystal Palace was built in 1858 and originally located near King St W and Shaw St. In 1878, the building was dismantled and moved to Exhibition grounds, where it was enlarged. The Crystal Palace stood there until 1906 when it was destroyed by fire. Today, the Horticulture Building occupies the site (CNE Archives)

2022/2022 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. Fort Rouillé bench, which shows an artist's impression of the Fort, is located at the southeast exterior of BMO Field. The Fort Rouillé Monument is on the south side of Exhibition Place, just east of the Scadding Cabin. The concrete walkways surrounding the monument delineate the walls of the 18th-century trading post
2022/2022 – There are 18 granite benches designed by artist Stephen Cruise commemorating historical places and sporting events at the CNE and Exhibition Place in Toronto. Fort Rouillé bench, which shows an artist’s impression of the Fort, is located at the southeast exterior of BMO Field. The Fort Rouillé Monument is on the south side of Exhibition Place, just east of the Scadding Cabin. The concrete walkways surrounding the monument delineate the walls of the 18th-century trading post

1958/2022 – Looking northwest on Bloor St W between Yonge St and Bay St in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto. In the archive photo, notice Zeller's department store and Tamblyn Drugs, once Canada's largest drugstore chain
1958/2022 – Looking northwest on Bloor St W between Yonge St and Bay St in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto. In the archive photo, notice Zeller’s department store and Tamblyn Drugs, once Canada’s largest drugstore chain (Canadian Architectural Archives, Panda Associates Fonds, PAN 58686-1-7)

2021/1974-84 – Looking south towards storefronts at 203, 205 and 207 Queen St E between George St and Sherbourne St in Toronto’s Moss Park neighbourhood. Built in 1884/1889, the commercial row building received heritage status from the city in 2020
2021/1974-84 – Looking south towards storefronts at 203, 205 and 207 Queen St E between George St and Sherbourne St in Toronto’s Moss Park neighbourhood. Built in 1884/1889, the commercial row building received heritage status from the city in 2020 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 626, Item 6)

1972/2022 - Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The row of buildings from 216-232 Queen St E was built in 1889, and 234-242 Queen St E, known as the Carlyle Block, was constructed in 1883. The group of buildings received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 50, Item 22)
1972/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Queen St E and Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. The row of buildings from 216-232 Queen St E was built in 1889, and 234-242 Queen St E, known as the Carlyle Block, was constructed in 1883. The group of buildings received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 50, Item 22)

1960s/2021 – Looking northeast from Queen St W and Bay St towards Old City Hall in downtown Toronto
1960s/2021 – Looking northeast from Queen St W and Bay St towards Old City Hall in downtown Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Series 65, File 561, Item 17)

Circa 1888/1950/2022 - The American Hotel stood on the northeast corner of Yonge St and Front St E in Toronto’s downtown from about 1844 until 1889. It was replaced by the former Board of Trade Building, which was demolished in 1958. Since 1982, the site has been home to a mirrored office building
Circa 1888/1950/2022 – The American Hotel stood on the northeast corner of Yonge St and Front St E in Toronto’s downtown from about 1844 until 1889. It was replaced by the former Board of Trade Building, which was demolished in 1958. Since 1982, the site has been home to a mirrored office building (Toronto Public Library R-6698 & City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 380, Item 183)

1954/2022 – The former Winchester Hotel & Hall, previously the Lakeview Hotel, is located at 531-537 Parliament St and Winchester St on the southeast corner in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1888, architects, Thomas Kennedy & William Holland designed the Second-Empire-style hotel. The building received heritage status from the city in 1975
1954/2022 – The former Winchester Hotel & Hall, previously the Lakeview Hotel, is located at 531-537 Parliament St and Winchester St on the southeast corner in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1888, architects, Thomas Kennedy & William Holland designed the Second-Empire-style hotel. The building received heritage status from the city in 1975 (Toronto Public Library R- 5790)

Circa 1914/2022 – Looking southeast towards Yonge St and Maitland St in the Church-Wellesley neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice in the archive photo the Salada Tea billboard advertisement. The tea company was founded in 1892
Circa 1914/2022 – Looking southeast towards Yonge St and Maitland St in the Church-Wellesley neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice in the archive photo the Salada Tea billboard advertisement. The tea company was founded in 1892 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 941)

2022/1925 - Queen's Wharf Lighthouse, or "Little Red," was constructed in 1861 and decommissioned in 1911. The archive photo shows the lighthouse in its original location next to the Harbour Master's House when it was at the foot of Bathurst St. In 1929, the heritage-designated lighthouse was moved about 450 m west to its present-day location between Fleet St and Lake Shore Blvd W
2022/1925 – Queen’s Wharf Lighthouse, or “Little Red,” was constructed in 1861 and decommissioned in 1911. The archive photo shows the lighthouse in its original location next to the Harbour Master’s House when it was at the foot of Bathurst St. In 1929, the heritage-designated lighthouse was moved about 450 m west to its present-day location between Fleet St and Lake Shore Blvd W (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 5953)

2022/1950-60s - Looking northwest towards the Queen's Wharf Lighthouse, or "Little Red," located between Fleet St and Lake Shore Blvd W (west of Bathurst St) in the Niagara neighbourhood of Toronto. In 1929, to save "Little Red" from demolition during the lake-filling, it was moved using wooden rollers and pulled to where it stands today, about 450 m west of the original foot of Bathurst St. The lighthouse received heritage status in 1973 and was restored in 1988
2022/1950-60s – Looking northwest towards the Queen’s Wharf Lighthouse, or “Little Red,” located between Fleet St and Lake Shore Blvd W (west of Bathurst St) in the Niagara neighbourhood of Toronto. In 1929, to save “Little Red” from demolition during the lake-filling, it was moved using wooden rollers and pulled to where it stands today, about 450 m west of the original foot of Bathurst St. The lighthouse received heritage status in 1973 and was restored in 1988 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 492, Item 139)

1950/2022 - Looking northwest towards the Queen's Wharf Lighthouse, or "Little Red," located between Fleet St and Lake Shore Blvd W in Toronto. In 1929, to save "Little Red" from demolition during the lake-filling, it was moved using wooden rollers 450 m west to where it stands today. The heritage-designated lighthouse is encircled by the TTC streetcar Fleet Loop
1950/2022 – Looking northwest towards the Queen’s Wharf Lighthouse, or “Little Red,” located between Fleet St and Lake Shore Blvd W in Toronto. In 1929, to save “Little Red” from demolition during the lake-filling, it was moved using wooden rollers 450 m west to where it stands today. The heritage-designated lighthouse is encircled by the TTC streetcar Fleet Loop (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1128, File 380, Item 46)

1972/2023 – Looking southeast towards the former Christie, Brown & Company factory, now George Brown College St James Campus, located on Adelaide St E, bordered by Frederick St, King St E and George St, in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The building received heritage status from the city in 1978
1972/2023 – Looking southeast towards the former Christie, Brown & Company factory, now George Brown College St James Campus, located on Adelaide St E, bordered by Frederick St, King St E and George St, in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The building received heritage status from the city in 1978 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 20, Item 5)

1972/2022 – Looking southwest towards the former Christie, Brown & Company factory, now George Brown College St James Campus, from Adelaide St E (previously known as Duke St) and Frederick St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The collection of late 19th and early 20th-century buildings received heritage status in 1978
1972/2022 – Looking southwest towards the former Christie, Brown & Company factory, now George Brown College St James Campus, from Adelaide St E (previously known as Duke St) and Frederick St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. The collection of late 19th and early 20th-century buildings received heritage status in 1978 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 18, Item 5)

1972/2020– Looking northeast from King St E and George St towards the former Christie, Brown & Company buildings. In the mid-1950s, the William E. Coutts Co (Hallmark Cards), a greeting card manufacturer, occupied the buildings. In 1971, the complex became home to George Brown College St James Campus
1972/2020– Looking northeast from King St E and George St towards the former Christie, Brown & Company buildings. In the mid-1950s, the William E. Coutts Co (Hallmark Cards), a greeting card manufacturer, occupied the buildings. In 1971, the complex became home to George Brown College St James Campus (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 20, Item 9)

1972/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Carlton St and Ontario St, in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. The building at 200 Carlton St received heritage status from the city in 2007
1972/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Carlton St and Ontario St, in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto. The building at 200 Carlton St received heritage status from the city in 2007 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 12, Item 14)

1972/2022 - Looking northeast toward the Westover Hotel, today's Filmores Hotel at Dundas St E and George St in Toronto’s Garden District. In the mid-1910s, the three-storey building, designed by architects Symons and Rae, was incorporated into the house on the property's north end. It was initially called the Wilton Court Apartments and later the Wilton Court Private Hotel. In the late 1950s, it became the Westover Hotel, then Stage 212 in the mid-1970s before becoming Filmores Hotel in the 1980s
1972/2022 -Looking northeast toward the Westover Hotel, today’s Filmores Hotel at Dundas St E and George St in Toronto’s Garden District. In the mid-1910s, the three-storey building, designed by architects Symons and Rae, was incorporated into the house on the property’s north end. It was initially called the Wilton Court Apartments and later the Wilton Court Private Hotel. In the late 1950s, it became the Westover Hotel, then Stage 212 in the mid-1970s before becoming Filmores Hotel in the 1980s (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 27, Item 21)

2009/January 7, 2023 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Bathurst St and Bloor St W in the Mirvish Village neighbourhood of Toronto. Honest Ed's opened in 1948 and was in that location until December 31, 2016
2009/January 7, 2023 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Bathurst St and Bloor St W in the Mirvish Village neighbourhood of Toronto. Honest Ed’s opened in 1948 and was in that location until December 31, 2016 (2009 photo courtesy of Google Maps)

1983-89/1960 – Honest Ed’s was located at 581 Bloor St W, between Bathurst St and Markham St in the Mirvish Village neighbourhood of Toronto
1983-89/1960 – Honest Ed’s was located at 581 Bloor St W, between Bathurst St and Markham St in the Mirvish Village neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 515, Item 3 & Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 465)

July 22, 1932/2023 – Looking northwest toward the Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Built in 1931, architect Charles Dolphin designed the building in the Art Deco style. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1987. With the Union Station Bus Terminal opening at CIBC Square in December 2020, the Bay St terminal closed in July 2021. The ModernTO redevelopment of the property will include the preservation and adaptive reuse of the former Toronto Coach Terminal building
July 22, 1932/2023 – Looking northwest toward the Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Built in 1931, architect Charles Dolphin designed the building in the Art Deco style. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1987. With the Union Station Bus Terminal opening at CIBC Square in December 2020, the Bay St terminal closed in July 2021. The ModernTO redevelopment of the property will include the preservation and adaptive reuse of the former Toronto Coach Terminal building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9307)

1972/2023 – Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at the southeast corner of Bond St and Shuter St in downtown Toronto's Garden District. Built in 1906/07, architects Sproatt & Rolph designed the structure in the Neo-Gothic style. The building received heritage status from the city in 1983
1972/2023 – Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at the southeast corner of Bond St and Shuter St in downtown Toronto’s Garden District. Built in 1906/07, architects Sproatt & Rolph designed the structure in the Neo-Gothic style. The building received heritage status from the city in 1983 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 13, Item 28)

1972/2023 – Looking south from Laplante Ave towards Gerrard St W, just west of Bay St in downtown Toronto. Notice the back of the Benjamin Johnson House built in 1875 on the left, now Jimmy’s Coffee. In the background of the archive photo is the 137 m or 450 ft cooling tower of the Enwave Energy Corporation – Walton Street Steam Plant which generates heat for the adjacent hospitals
1972/2023 – Looking south from Laplante Ave towards Gerrard St W, just west of Bay St in downtown Toronto. Notice the back of the Benjamin Johnson House built in 1875 on the left, now Jimmy’s Coffee. In the background of the archive photo is the 137 m or 450 ft cooling tower of the Enwave Energy Corporation – Walton Street Steam Plant which generates heat for the adjacent hospitals (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 67, Item 28)

1998/2022 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St W and Beverley St in the Entertainment District of Toronto. The building at 272 Queen St W received heritage status from the city in 1975. It was once home to Pizza Pizza, and today it's an LCBO
1998/2022 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St W and Beverley St in the Entertainment District of Toronto. The building at 272 Queen St W received heritage status from the city in 1975. It was once home to Pizza Pizza, and today it’s an LCBO (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1907, File 131, Item 12)

1972/1998/2022 – The northwest corner of Queen St W and Beverley St in Toronto’s Entertainment District of Toronto. The building at 272 Queen St W received heritage status from the city in 1975. It was once home to Pizza Pizza, and today it’s an LCBO
1972/1998/2022 – The northwest corner of Queen St W and Beverley St in Toronto’s Entertainment District of Toronto. The building at 272 Queen St W received heritage status from the city in 1975. It was once home to Pizza Pizza, and today it’s an LCBO (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 41, Item 25 & Series 1907, File 131, Item 12)

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