Past & Present – Part 21

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1912/2022 - Royal Alexandra Theatre is located at 260 King St W in Toronto's Entertainment District. Built in 1907, architect John McIntosh Lyle designed the Beaux-Arts style building. The theatre became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1987, on its 80th birthday
1912/2022 – Royal Alexandra Theatre is located at 260 King St W in Toronto’s Entertainment District. Built in 1907, architect John McIntosh Lyle designed the Beaux-Arts style building. The theatre became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1987, on its 80th birthday (Toronto Public Library PC_3768)

1972/2022 – The southeast corner of Parliament St and Gerrard St E in the Cabbagetown/Regent Park neighbourhoods of Toronto
1972/2022 – The southeast corner of Parliament St and Gerrard St E in the Cabbagetown/Regent Park neighbourhoods of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 32, Item 4)

1972/2022 – Looking northeast towards 434 Gerrard St E at Sumach St, in Toronto’s Cabbagetown South neighbourhood. Built in 1890/91 and originally the Gerrard Street Pharmacy, the archive photo shows the building was later home to the Avion House. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1975
1972/2022 – Looking northeast towards 434 Gerrard St E at Sumach St, in Toronto’s Cabbagetown South neighbourhood. Built in 1890/91 and originally the Gerrard Street Pharmacy, the archive photo shows the building was later home to the Avion House. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1975 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 36, Item 12)

2020/January 31, 1929 - Queen's Wharf Lighthouse, or "Little Red," was constructed in 1861. The archive photo shows the lighthouse in its original location next to the Harbour Master's House at the foot of Bathurst St when it marked the entrance to Toronto Harbour. In 1929, to save the lighthouse from demolition during the lake-filling, the heritage-designated lighthouse was moved using wooden rollers about 450 m west to its present-day location between Fleet St and Lake Shore Blvd W
2020/January 31, 1929 – Queen’s Wharf Lighthouse, or “Little Red,” was constructed in 1861. The archive photo shows the lighthouse in its original location next to the Harbour Master’s House at the foot of Bathurst St when it marked the entrance to Toronto Harbour. In 1929, to save the lighthouse from demolition during the lake-filling, the heritage-designated lighthouse was moved using wooden rollers about 450 m west to its present-day location between Fleet St and Lake Shore Blvd W (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 15655)

July 13, 1983/2022 – The Lakeview Restaurant at 1132 Dundas St W, east of Ossington Ave on the north side in the Trinity-Bellwoods neighbourhood. Since 1932, The Lakeview has been serving traditional breakfasts and more to its guests. The restaurant has been featured in Diners, Drive-ins and Dives along with Hollywood movies like Hairspray and Cocktail
July 13, 1983/2022 – The Lakeview Restaurant at 1132 Dundas St W, east of Ossington Ave on the north side in the Trinity-Bellwoods neighbourhood. Since 1932, The Lakeview has been serving traditional breakfasts and more to its guests. The restaurant has been featured in Diners, Drive-ins and Dives along with Hollywood movies like Hairspray and Cocktail (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 71, Item 136)

December 19, 1931/2023 – Looking southwest toward the Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Built in 1931, architect Charles Dolphin designed the building in the Art Deco style. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1987. With the Union Station Bus Terminal opening at CIBC Square in December 2020, the Bay St terminal closed in July 2021. The ModernTO redevelopment of the property will include the preservation and adaptive reuse of the former Toronto Coach Terminal building
December 19, 1931/2023 – Looking southwest toward the Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Built in 1931, architect Charles Dolphin designed the building in the Art Deco style. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1987. With the Union Station Bus Terminal opening at CIBC Square in December 2020, the Bay St terminal closed in July 2021. The ModernTO redevelopment of the property will include the preservation and adaptive reuse of the former Toronto Coach Terminal building (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9041)

December 19, 1931/2019 – Looking southwest toward the Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Built in 1931, architect Charles Dolphin designed the building in the Art Deco style. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1987. In both photos, the terminal was in use; however, when the Union Station Bus Terminal opened in 2020, the Bay St terminal was decommissioned the following year. The ModernTO redevelopment of the property will include the preservation and adaptive reuse of the heritage property
December 19, 1931/2019 – Looking southwest toward the Toronto Coach Terminal at the corner of Bay St and Edward St in downtown Toronto. Built in 1931, architect Charles Dolphin designed the building in the Art Deco style. The structure received heritage status from the city in 1987. In both photos, the terminal was in use; however, when the Union Station Bus Terminal opened in 2020, the Bay St terminal was decommissioned the following year. The ModernTO redevelopment of the property will include the preservation and adaptive reuse of the heritage property (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 9041)

1911/1972/2023 – Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at the southeast corner of Bond St and Shuter St in the Garden District of Toronto. Built in 1906/07, architects Sproatt & Rolph designed the building in the Neo-Gothic style. The Parsonage was built and furnished through a donation from Chester Massey, whose father built Massey Hall. The building received heritage status from the city in 1983
1911/1972/2023 – Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at the southeast corner of Bond St and Shuter St in the Garden District of Toronto. Built in 1906/07, architects Sproatt & Rolph designed the building in the Neo-Gothic style. The Parsonage was built and furnished through a donation from Chester Massey, whose father built Massey Hall. The building received heritage status from the city in 1983 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 13, Item 28 & Toronto Public Library PC3945)

2022 – The first Methodist chapel in Toronto was once located on the corner of King St W and Jordan St, where the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building at 25 King St W. Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St W is the descendant of the chapel. The plaque reads: "The first Methodist Church in Toronto was built upon this site in A. D. 1818"
2022 – The first Methodist chapel in Toronto was once located on the corner of King St W and Jordan St, where the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building at 25 King St W. Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St W is the descendant of the chapel. The plaque reads: “The first Methodist Church in Toronto was built upon this site in A. D. 1818”

1952/2021 – Gladstone House at the northeast corner of Queen St W and Gladstone Ave in the Art and Design District of Toronto. Built in 1889/90 and designed by architect George Martell Miller, the structure received heritage status from the city in 1973
1952/2021 – Gladstone House at the northeast corner of Queen St W and Gladstone Ave in the Art and Design District of Toronto. Built in 1889/90 and designed by architect George Martell Miller, the structure received heritage status from the city in 1973 (Toronto Public Library R-6083)

February 22, 1929/2023 – Looking southwest towards the rear of Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E, between Bond St and Church St in the Garden District of Toronto. The archive photo shows the rebuilding of the Metropolitan United Church. In the prior year, a fire swept through the church, and only the south portions of the church, including the tower and spire, were left standing
February 22, 1929/2023 – Looking southwest towards the rear of Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E, between Bond St and Church St in the Garden District of Toronto. The archive photo shows the rebuilding of the Metropolitan United Church. In the prior year, a fire swept through the church, and only the south portions of the church, including the tower and spire, were left standing (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 15777)

1950/2021 –  The Toronto Board of Trade Building was once located at the northeast corner of Front St E and Yonge St in Toronto’s downtown. Notice the Bank of Montreal building, today’s Hockey Hall of Fame on the left
1950/2021 – The Toronto Board of Trade Building was once located at the northeast corner of Front St E and Yonge St in Toronto’s downtown. Notice the Bank of Montreal building, today’s Hockey Hall of Fame on the left (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 380, Item 183)

1972/2022 – The northwest corner of Queen St W and Beverley St in Toronto’s Entertainment District of Toronto. The building at 272 Queen St W received heritage status from the city in 1975 and is home to a LCBO
1972/2022 – The northwest corner of Queen St W and Beverley St in Toronto’s Entertainment District of Toronto. The building at 272 Queen St W received heritage status from the city in 1975 and is home to a LCBO (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 41, Item 25)

1972/July 30, 2022 – Originally, the Kormann House, and later Canada House Hotel/Tavern, was located at 229 Queen St E and Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. 

In 1897, George J Foy built the three-storey brick hotel designed by architect John Wilson Siddall. The city directory shows Frantz J Kormann operated the hotel. In the mid-1910s, the building became the Canada House Hotel/Tavern, which was in business for nearly eight decades before closing in the 1990s. The structure received heritage status from the city in 2007. 

Today, the building sits empty with plans for redevelopment (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 60, Item 24)
1972/July 30, 2022 – Originally, the Kormann House, and later Canada House Hotel/Tavern, was located at 229 Queen St E and Sherbourne St in the Moss Park neighbourhood of Toronto. In 1897, George J Foy built the three-storey brick hotel designed by architect John Wilson Siddall. The city directory shows Frantz J Kormann operated the hotel. In the mid-1910s, the building became the Canada House Hotel/Tavern, which was in business for nearly eight decades before closing in the 1990s. The structure received heritage status from the city in 2007. Today, the building sits empty with plans for redevelopment (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 60, Item 24)

1972/2023 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Bay St and Gerrard St W, in the Discovery District of Toronto. The archive photo shows Herman Furs on the corner. Today, the corner is home to a mixed-use building. Bay St, between Queen St W and College St, was previously known as Terauley St. In 1797, Dr James Macaulay, a former army surgeon for the Queen’s Rangers, was granted several acres of land in the area west of Yonge St and north of Queen St W from the Crown. His residence was called Teraulay Cottage
1972/2023 – Looking southwest towards the corner of Bay St and Gerrard St W, in the Discovery District of Toronto. The archive photo shows Herman Furs on the corner. Today, the corner is home to a mixed-use building. Bay St, between Queen St W and College St, was previously known as Terauley St. In 1797, Dr James Macaulay, a former army surgeon for the Queen’s Rangers, was granted several acres of land in the area west of Yonge St and north of Queen St W from the Crown. His residence was called Teraulay Cottage (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 60, Item 3)

1949/2022 – Looking northeast towards the Horse Palace’s west entrance during the Canadian National Exhibition. Built in 1931, architect John James Woolnough designed the equestrian facility, considered one of Toronto’s finest Art Deco buildings. There were 2 million bricks, 29,000 cubic feet of cut stone and 1,700 tons of structural steel used in its construction
1949/2022 – Looking northeast towards the Horse Palace’s west entrance during the Canadian National Exhibition. Built in 1931, architect John James Woolnough designed the equestrian facility, considered one of Toronto’s finest Art Deco buildings. There were 2 million bricks, 29,000 cubic feet of cut stone and 1,700 tons of structural steel used in its construction (Courtesy of the Canadian National Exhibition Association Archives)

1952/2022 - Looking northwest toward the south façade of the Horse Palace in Toronto’s Exhibition Place. The equestrian facility was built in 1931, and architect John James Woolnough designed the building in the Art Deco style. The Horse Palace received heritage status from the city in 1979
1952/2022 – Looking northwest toward the south façade of the Horse Palace in Toronto’s Exhibition Place. The equestrian facility was built in 1931, and architect John James Woolnough designed the building in the Art Deco style. The Horse Palace received heritage status from the city in 1979 (Courtesy of the Canadian National Exhibition Association Archives)

2022/1900 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Bloor St W and Dovercourt Rd, in the Bloorcourt Village neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the aftermath of a fire in the previous building. It was replaced with the present-day Mitchell Building, constructed in 1914. Notice the DeLorean in the current photo on the right. I’d never seen a DeLorean on the road, and that day, I saw it three times in Bloorcourt Village. It took me back to the future!
2022/1900 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Bloor St W and Dovercourt Rd, in the Bloorcourt Village neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows the aftermath of a fire in the previous building. It was replaced with the present-day Mitchell Building, constructed in 1914. Notice the DeLorean in the current photo on the right. I’d never seen a DeLorean on the road, and that day, I saw it three times in Bloorcourt Village. It took me back to the future! (Toronto Public Library R- 4507)

1931/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Lansdowne Ave and Bloor St W, in the Junction-Wallace Emerson neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows an Imperial Bank of Canada branch (today's CIBC) once occupied the site. Notice the Canadian General Electric Company Ltd Ward Street Works water tower in the background, which still exists today
1931/2023 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Lansdowne Ave and Bloor St W, in the Junction-Wallace Emerson neighbourhood of Toronto. The archive photo shows an Imperial Bank of Canada branch (today’s CIBC) once occupied the site. Notice the Canadian General Electric Company Ltd Ward Street Works water tower in the background, which still exists today (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 3, Item 1270)

2022/1931 - The dome over the exercise ring at the Horse Palace in Toronto’s Exhibition Place. The present-day photo was taken during the 100th anniversary of The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair. The structure was built in 1931, and architect John James Woolnough designed the building in the Art Deco style. The Horse Palace received heritage status from the city in 1979
2022/1931 – The dome over the exercise ring at the Horse Palace in Toronto’s Exhibition Place. The present-day photo was taken during the 100th anniversary of The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair. The structure was built in 1931, and architect John James Woolnough designed the building in the Art Deco style. The Horse Palace received heritage status from the city in 1979 (Courtesy of the Canadian National Exhibition Association Archives)

1913/2022 – The Palm House Conservatory at Allan Gardens is located at 160 Gerrard St E in the Garden District neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1910, the Victorian-style conservatory was designed by architect Robert McCallum. It’s made from glass, steel, brick and wood and features a 16-sided dome. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973. Notice the Equilibrium mural by Okuda San Miguel on the east facade of Parkside Student Residences at Jarvis St and Carlton St
1913/2022 – The Palm House Conservatory at Allan Gardens is located at 160 Gerrard St E in the Garden District neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1910, the Victorian-style conservatory was designed by architect Robert McCallum. It’s made from glass, steel, brick and wood and features a 16-sided dome. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973. Notice the Equilibrium mural by Okuda San Miguel on the east facade of Parkside Student Residences at Jarvis St and Carlton St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 541)

1921/2022 - The Coliseum arena formally opened in December 1921 for the building dedication and a Track & Field meet. In the archive photo, notice the seats around the ring are wooden chairs. The present-day photo of the Horse Show was taken during the 100th anniversary of the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in what’s known today as the Coca-Cola Coliseum at Exhibition Place
1921/2022 – The Coliseum arena formally opened in December 1921 for the building dedication and a Track & Field meet. In the archive photo, notice the seats around the ring are wooden chairs. The present-day photo of the Horse Show was taken during the 100th anniversary of The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in what’s known today as the Coca-Cola Coliseum at Exhibition Place (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 937)

1931/2022 - The box and standing stalls at the Horse Palace in Exhibition Place. Built in 1931, architect John James Woolnough designed the building in the Art Deco style. The present-day photo was taken during a ghost walk led by After Dark Tours. Click for more about the ghosts of Exhibition Place. The Horse Palace received heritage status from the city in 1979
1931/2022 – The box and standing stalls at the Horse Palace in Exhibition Place. Built in 1931, architect John James Woolnough designed the building in the Art Deco style. The present-day photo was taken during a ghost walk led by After Dark Tours. Click for more about the ghosts of Exhibition Place. The Horse Palace received heritage status from the city in 1979 (Courtesy of the Canadian National Exhibition Association Archives)

1921/2023 – Looking northeast towards the Coliseum's West Annex, today's Coca-Cola Coliseum at Exhibition Place in Toronto. Built in 1921/22, architect George FW Price designed the structure. The archive photo shows rides and food stands on the CNE Midway in front of the Coliseum during construction. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973
1921/2023 – Looking northeast towards the Coliseum’s West Annex, today’s Coca-Cola Coliseum at Exhibition Place in Toronto. Built in 1921/22, architect George FW Price designed the structure. The archive photo shows rides and food stands on the CNE Midway in front of the Coliseum during construction. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 945)

Between 1983-89/April 2022 – Looking southeast between Bathurst St and Markham St along Bloor St W in the Mirvish Village neighbourhood of Toronto. Honest Ed's opened in 1948 and was in that location until December 31, 2016
Between 1983-89/April 2022 – Looking southeast between Bathurst St and Markham St along Bloor St W in the Mirvish Village neighbourhood of Toronto. Honest Ed’s opened in 1948 and was in that location until December 31, 2016 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 515, Item 3)

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