Past & Present – Part 17

1919/2022 - Once the Dominion Business College, today, the Planet Traveler Hostel is located at 357 College St and Campbell Russell Ln, in the Kensington Market neighbourhood of Toronto. The building received heritage status from the city in 2018. Notice St Stephen-In-The-Fields Church on the right
1919/2022 – Once the Dominion Business College, today, the Planet Traveler Hostel is located at 357 College St and Campbell Russell Ln, in the Kensington Market neighbourhood of Toronto. The building received heritage status from the city in 2018. Notice St Stephen-In-The-Fields Church on the right (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 785)

2022/1926 – The Hemingway Building, originally the Cedarvale Mansions, is located at 1597-1599 Bathurst St in the Forest Hill South neighbourhood of Toronto. In 1923/24, Ernest Hemingway lived in this apartment building while working as a journalist with  the Toronto Star hence the name
2022/1926 – The Hemingway Building, originally the Cedarvale Mansions, is located at 1597-1599 Bathurst St in the Forest Hill South neighbourhood of Toronto. In 1923/24, Ernest Hemingway lived in this apartment building while working as a journalist with the Toronto Star hence the name (Toronto Public Library TSPA_0106401F)

1988-91/2021 – From 1965 until 2007, the Canary Restaurant was located at 425/441 Cherry St and Front St E in the West Don Lands neighbourhood. Notice the restaurant’s iconic neon sign in the archive photo. Today, the heritage building is part of the upcoming mixed-use development to be known as the Canary House
1988-91/2021 – From 1965 until 2007, the Canary Restaurant was located at 425/441 Cherry St and Front St E in the West Don Lands neighbourhood. Notice the restaurant’s iconic neon sign in the archive photo. Today, the heritage building is part of the upcoming mixed-use development to be known as the Canary House (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 654, Item 11)

1955/2021 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St W and Ossington Ave, in the Trinity-Bellwoods neighbourhood of Toronto. Once home to the Columbia Hotel, the building was taken down in 2009 and replaced with the present-day mixed-use structure
1955/2021 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Queen St W and Ossington Ave, in the Trinity-Bellwoods neighbourhood of Toronto. Once home to the Columbia Hotel, the building was taken down in 2009 and replaced with the present-day mixed-use structure (Toronto Public Library R-6084)

1931/2022 - Looking southwest towards the corner of St Clair Ave and Lansdowne Ave, in the Earlscourt neighbourhood of Toronto
1931/2022 – Looking southwest towards the corner of St Clair Ave and Lansdowne Ave, in the Earlscourt neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 8367)

1972/2021 - Looking northeast towards the corner of Dundas St E and Church St in the downtown neighbourhood of Toronto. Gas at 43¢ a gallon
1972/2021 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Dundas St E and Church St in the downtown neighbourhood of Toronto. Gas at 43¢ a gallon (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 51, Item 16)

Mackenzie House Museum is located at 82 Bond St, just south of Dundas St E in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The historic property built in 1857 was the last home of William Lyon Mackenzie, Toronto's first mayor. The house received heritage status from the city in 1973
2022-1972 – The Mackenzie House Museum is located at 82 Bond St, just south of Dundas St E in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. The historic property built in 1857 was the last home of William Lyon Mackenzie, Toronto’s first mayor. The house received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 13, Item 30)

1915/2022 – Looking southwest towards Massey Hall at 178 Victoria St and Shuter St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Built in 1894 by Hart Massey, industrialist and operator of a large farm equipment manufacturing company, the concert hall was designed by architect Sidney Badgley. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973
1915/2022 – Looking southwest towards Massey Hall at 178 Victoria St and Shuter St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Built in 1894 by Hart Massey, industrialist and operator of a large farm equipment manufacturing company, the concert hall was designed by architect Sidney Badgley. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 (Toronto Public Library PC1095)

1972/2022 – Looking southwest towards Massey Hall at 178 Victoria St and Shuter St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Built in 1894 by Hart Massey, industrialist and operator of a large farm equipment manufacturing company, the concert hall was designed by architect Sidney Badgley. Did you know that the Massey family lived in a stately home at 515 Jarvis St? Today, it’s the Keg Mansion restaurant
1972/2022 – Looking southwest towards Massey Hall at 178 Victoria St and Shuter St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Built in 1894 by Hart Massey, industrialist and operator of a large farm equipment manufacturing company, the concert hall was designed by architect Sidney Badgley. Did you know that the Massey family lived in a stately home at 515 Jarvis St? Today, it’s the Keg Mansion restaurant (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 17, Item 17)

1947/2022 – Looking towards the front entrance of Massey Hall on Shuter St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. In the archive photo, notice the streetcar in the distance on Yonge St
1947/2022 – Looking towards the front entrance of Massey Hall on Shuter St in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. In the archive photo, notice the streetcar in the distance on Yonge St (Archives of Ontario I0004568)

1978-80/2022 - Looking southwest towards the west side of Yonge St from Gerrard St E in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Notice in the archive photo that Bassel’s Restaurant is in the Gerrard Building, built in 1924 and designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph. Today, the heritage-designated façade of the Gerrard Building is part of the Concord Sky condo development
1978-80/2022 – Looking southwest towards the west side of Yonge St from Gerrard St E in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Notice in the archive photo that Bassel’s Restaurant is in the Gerrard Building, built in 1924 and designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph. Today, the heritage-designated façade of the Gerrard Building is part of the Concord Sky condo development (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 310, Item 5)

1920s/2022 - Looking southwest towards the west side of Yonge St from Gerrard St E in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. In the archive photo, Olympia Gerrard Recreation Club is in the Gerrard Building, built in 1924 and designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph. Today, the heritage-designated façade of the Gerrard Building is part of the Concord Sky condo development
1920s/2022 – Looking southwest towards the west side of Yonge St from Gerrard St E in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. In the archive photo, Olympia Gerrard Recreation Club is in the Gerrard Building, built in 1924 and designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph. Today, the heritage-designated façade of the Gerrard Building is part of the Concord Sky condo development (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 3179)

1978-80/1920s - Looking southwest towards the west side of Yonge St from Gerrard St E, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Bassel's Restaurant and Olympia Bowling Club once occupied the Gerrard Building at 385 Yonge St
1978-80/1920s – Looking southwest towards the west side of Yonge St from Gerrard St E, in the Downtown Yonge area of Toronto. Bassel’s Restaurant and Olympia Bowling Club once occupied the Gerrard Building at 385 Yonge St (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 310, Item 5 & Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 3179)

northeast towards the corner of John St and Nelson St in Toronto's Entertainment District. In the late 1800s, 133 John St was the residence of Ned Hanlan, one of the country's greatest oarsmen. The building received heritage status from the city in 2017
1972/2022 – Looking northeast towards the corner of John St and Nelson St in Toronto’s Entertainment District. In the late 1800s, 133 John St was the residence of Ned Hanlan, one of the country’s greatest oarsmen. The building received heritage status from the city in 2017 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 41, Item 6)

1952/2022 – The Horse Palace is located at Toronto’s Exhibition Place. Built in 1931, architect John James Woolnough designed the building in the Art Deco style. The Horse Palace received heritage status from the city in 1979
1952/2022 – The Horse Palace is located at Toronto’s Exhibition Place. Built in 1931, architect John James Woolnough designed the building in the Art Deco style. The Horse Palace received heritage status from the city in 1979 (Toronto Public Library R-3474)

1980s-90s/2022 – The former McLaughlin Planetarium is located at 90 Queens Park on the south side of the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. It opened in 1968 and was founded by a grant from Colonel R Samuel McLaughlin. The planetarium closed its doors in 1995. Today, the building is used as artifact storage by ROM
1980s-90s/2022 – The former McLaughlin Planetarium is located at 90 Queens Park on the south side of the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. It opened in 1968 and was founded by a grant from Colonel R Samuel McLaughlin. The planetarium closed its doors in 1995. Today, the building is used as artifact storage by ROM (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 197, Item 7)

1967/2022 – The Half Way House was a hotel, an apartment and later a store once on the northwest corner of Kingston Rd and Midland Ave. Alexander Thompson built the Georgian two-storey structure in 1847/48 and was originally a resting place for stagecoach passengers between Pickering and Toronto. In 1966, the house was moved to Black Creek Pioneer Village. Both photos were taken at Pioneer Village
1967/2022 – The Half Way House was a hotel, an apartment and later a store once on the northwest corner of Kingston Rd and Midland Ave. Alexander Thompson built the Georgian two-storey structure in 1847/48 and was originally a resting place for stagecoach passengers between Pickering and Toronto. In 1966, the house was moved to Black Creek Pioneer Village. Both photos were taken at Pioneer Village (Toronto Public Library R-6556 )

1920/1967 – The Half Way House was a hotel, an apartment and later a store once on the northwest corner of Kingston Rd and Midland Ave. Alexander Thompson built the Georgian two-storey structure in 1847/48 and was originally a resting place for stagecoach passengers between Pickering and Toronto. In 1966, the house was moved to Black Creek Pioneer Village
1920/1967 – The Half Way House was a hotel, an apartment and later a store once on the northwest corner of Kingston Rd and Midland Ave. Alexander Thompson built the Georgian two-storey structure in 1847/48 and was originally a resting place for stagecoach passengers between Pickering and Toronto. In 1966, the house was moved to Black Creek Pioneer Village (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 1737)

1926/2022 – The Half Way House was a hotel, an apartment and later a store once on the northwest corner of Kingston Rd and Midland Ave. Alexander Thompson built the Georgian two-storey structure in 1847/48 and was originally a resting place for stagecoach passengers between Pickering and Toronto. In 1966, the house was moved to Black Creek Pioneer Village
1926/2022 – The Half Way House was a hotel, an apartment and later a store once on the northwest corner of Kingston Rd and Midland Ave. Alexander Thompson built the Georgian two-storey structure in 1847/48 and was originally a resting place for stagecoach passengers between Pickering and Toronto. In 1966, the house was moved to Black Creek Pioneer Village (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 8411)

1953/2022 – The Half Way House was a hotel, an apartment and later a store once on the northwest corner of Kingston Rd and Midland Ave. Alexander Thompson built the Georgian two-storey structure in 1847/48 and was originally a resting place for stagecoach passengers between Pickering and Toronto. In 1966, the house was moved to Black Creek Pioneer Village
1953/2022 – The Half Way House was a hotel, an apartment and later a store once on the northwest corner of Kingston Rd and Midland Ave. Alexander Thompson built the Georgian two-storey structure in 1847/48 and was originally a resting place for stagecoach passengers between Pickering and Toronto. In 1966, the house was moved to Black Creek Pioneer Village (Toronto Public Library R-6248)

Circa 1930/2022 – Looking west across Victoria St towards Yonge St from Richmond St E, notice the Confederation Life Building on the right
Circa 1930/2022 – Looking west across Victoria St towards Yonge St from Richmond St E, notice the Confederation Life Building on the right (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1568, Item 417)

1912/2022 – The Half Way House was a hotel, an apartment and later a store once on the northwest corner of Kingston Rd and Midland Ave. Alexander Thompson built the Georgian two-storey structure in 1847/48 and was originally a resting place for stagecoach passengers between Pickering and Toronto. In 1966, the house was moved to Black Creek Pioneer Village
1912/2022 – The Half Way House was a hotel, an apartment and later a store once on the northwest corner of Kingston Rd and Midland Ave. Alexander Thompson built the Georgian two-storey structure in 1847/48 and was originally a resting place for stagecoach passengers between Pickering and Toronto. In 1966, the house was moved to Black Creek Pioneer Village (Toronto Public Library R-6555)

1961/2022 – Looking northwest towards the Confederation Life Building at the corner of Richmond St E and Victoria St, in Downtown Yonge Toronto. It was home to the Confederation Life Association until 1955. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 and Ontario Heritage Trust in 1975. Notice in the archive photo the British American gas station and the Saphire Tavern
1961/2022 – Looking northwest towards the Confederation Life Building at the corner of Richmond St E and Victoria St, in Downtown Yonge Toronto. It was home to the Confederation Life Association until 1955. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 and Ontario Heritage Trust in 1975. Notice in the archive photo the British American gas station and the Saphire Tavern (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 1, ID 62)

2021/1950s – Looking northeast towards the Confederation Life Building located at ‪20 Richmond St E, between Yonge St and Victoria St in Downtown Yonge Toronto. Built in 1890/92, architects Knox, Elliot & Jarvis designed the building with Romanesque Revival and French Gothic elements. It was home to the Confederation Life Association until 1955. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 and Ontario Heritage Trust in 1975
2021/1950s – Looking northeast towards the Confederation Life Building located at ‪20 Richmond St E, between Yonge St and Victoria St in Downtown Yonge Toronto. Built in 1890/92, architects Knox, Elliot & Jarvis designed the building with Romanesque Revival and French Gothic elements. It was home to the Confederation Life Association until 1955. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 and Ontario Heritage Trust in 1975 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1567, Series 577, Item 108)

1934/2022 – Looking west towards the Paradise Theatre located at 1006 Bloor St W and Westmoreland Ave, in the Bloorcourt Village neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1937, architect Benjamin Brown designed the theatre in magnificent Art Deco style. The building received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 2007. Notice in the archive photo the streetcar tracks once on Bloor St
1934/2022 – Looking west towards the Paradise Theatre located at 1006 Bloor St W and Westmoreland Ave, in the Bloorcourt Village neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1937, architect Benjamin Brown designed the theatre in magnificent Art Deco style. The building received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 2007. Notice in the archive photo the streetcar tracks once on Bloor St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 1150)

2022/1972 – Looking south from Soho St towards Queen St W in the Entertainment District of Toronto. The façade of the building on the left at 367 Queen St W has been incorporated into the present-day building. The building on the right at 373 Queen St W was home to Peter Pan Lunch and today is known as Peter Pan Bistro
2022/1972 – Looking south from Soho St towards Queen St W in the Entertainment District of Toronto. The façade of the building on the left at 367 Queen St W has been incorporated into the present-day building. The building on the right at 373 Queen St W was home to Peter Pan Lunch and today is known as Peter Pan Bistro (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 48, Item 25)

1971/2022 - Looking southwest towards 1140 Yonge St and Marlborough Ave in the Summerhill neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1929/30, architects Sparling, Morton & Forbes designed the showroom and dealership for Pierce-Arrow Auto. The building became the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) production studio where series including Mr Dressup, Front Page Challenge, The Friendly Giant and the Tommy Hunter Show were filmed. It later was home to Staples and remains empty today. The building received heritage status from the city in 1978
1971/2022 – Looking southwest towards 1140 Yonge St and Marlborough Ave in the Summerhill neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1929/30, architects Sparling, Morton & Forbes designed the showroom and dealership for Pierce-Arrow Auto. The building became the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) production studio where series including Mr Dressup, Front Page Challenge, The Friendly Giant and the Tommy Hunter Show were filmed. It later was home to Staples and remains empty today. The building received heritage status from the city in 1978 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 1, Item 103)

1898/2022 – Looking towards the north end of the Great Hall at St Lawrence Hall, located at 157 King St E and Jarvis St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1850, architect William Thomas designed the Renaissance Revival style 3-storey T-shaped building. The structure became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1967 and received heritage status from the city in 1973
1898/2022 – Looking towards the north end of the Great Hall at St Lawrence Hall, located at 157 King St E and Jarvis St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1850, architect William Thomas designed the Renaissance Revival style 3-storey T-shaped building. The structure became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1967 and received heritage status from the city in 1973 (Toronto Public Library R-4334)

1898/2022 – Looking towards the south end of the Great Hall at St Lawrence Hall, located at 157 King St E and Jarvis St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1850, architect William Thomas designed the Renaissance Revival style 3-storey T-shaped building. The structure became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1967 and received heritage status from the city in 1973
1898/2022 – Looking towards the south end of the Great Hall at St Lawrence Hall, located at 157 King St E and Jarvis St in the Old Town, St Lawrence neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1850, architect William Thomas designed the Renaissance Revival style 3-storey T-shaped building. The structure became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1967 and received heritage status from the city in 1973 (Toronto Public Library R-4331)

2022/1963 – Looking southeast towards the Bandshell located in Bandshell Park at Exhibition Place in Toronto. Built in 1936, architects Craig & Madill designed the open-air Art Deco-style concert venue. The Bandshell was built to replace an earlier bandstand stage. The Bandshell received heritage status from the city in 1973. In the present-day photo, notice the cement base where the Canadian National Exhibition Flagpole once stood
2022/1963 – Looking southeast towards the Bandshell located in Bandshell Park at Exhibition Place in Toronto. Built in 1936, architects Craig & Madill designed the open-air Art Deco-style concert venue. The Bandshell was built to replace an earlier bandstand stage. The Bandshell received heritage status from the city in 1973. In the present-day photo, notice the cement base where the Canadian National Exhibition Flagpole once stood (CNE Archives)

1980-90s/2022 – Looking northwest from the Martin Goodman Trail along the waterfront towards the Princes' Gates, the CNE and Exhibition Place entrance is located at Strachan Ave and Lake Shore Blvd W in the Niagara neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1927, architects Chapman & Oxley designed the structure in the iconic Beaux-Arts style. The Princes' Gates received heritage status from the city in 1973
1980-90s/2022 – Looking northwest from the Martin Goodman Trail along the waterfront towards the Princes’ Gates, the CNE and Exhibition Place entrance is located at Strachan Ave and Lake Shore Blvd W in the Niagara neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1927, architects Chapman & Oxley designed the structure in the iconic Beaux-Arts style. The Princes’ Gates received heritage status from the city in 1973 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 56, Item 7)

1961/2022 – The Hockey Hall of Fame was once located directly across from the main entrance of the Food Building on Nova Scotia Ave at Exhibition Place. The building faced south towards the former Exhibition Stadium & Grandstand, where the north portion of BMO Field stands today. The Hockey Hall of Fame was built in 1960/61. The entrance of the Modernist structure featured a folded-plate concrete canopy supported by four granite columns. In 1967, an addition was constructed on the east side to further expand on Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. The building was torn down in 2006 to make way for the soccer stadium; however, pieces of the Halls of Fame were preserved. They're located at Gate 5 of BMO Field and include the entrance and the "Face-Off" mural by Canadian artist Ron Satok
1961/2022 – The Hockey Hall of Fame was once located directly across from the main entrance of the Food Building on Nova Scotia Ave at Exhibition Place. The building faced south towards the former Exhibition Stadium & Grandstand, where the north portion of BMO Field stands today. The Hockey Hall of Fame was built in 1960/61. The entrance of the Modernist structure featured a folded-plate concrete canopy supported by four granite columns. In 1967, an addition was constructed on the east side to further expand on Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame. The building was torn down in 2006 to make way for the soccer stadium; however, pieces of the Halls of Fame were preserved. They’re located at Gate 5 of BMO Field and include the entrance and the “Face-Off” mural by Canadian artist Ron Satok (Courtesy of the Canadian National Exhibition Association Archives)

1940s/2022 - Looking northwest from Victoria St and Queen St E at the back of Loew's Yonge Street Theatre, today the Elgin and Winter Garden Theatre Centre. Built in 1913/14, Marcus Loew hired architects Thomas W Lamb & Stanley Makepeace to design the Edwardian-style double-decker
1940s/2022 – Looking northwest from Victoria St and Queen St E at the back of Loew’s Yonge Street Theatre, today the Elgin and Winter Garden Theatre Centre. Built in 1913/14, Marcus Loew hired architects Thomas W Lamb & Stanley Makepeace to design the Edwardian-style double-decker (City of Toronto Archives, Ken Webster Fonds, Fonds 251, Series 1278, File 100)

1911/2022 – Looking west on the “Grand Plaza of Exhibition City,” where Princes’ Blvd at Manitoba Dr intersect today. The covered Gooderham Fountain in the centre was presented for the 1911 CNE. Notice the Horticulture Building on the left and the Administration Building, also known as the Press Building, on the right. In 1958, the Princess Margaret Fountain was installed and is located approximately 31 m or 100 ft southeast of where the Gooderham Fountain once stood
1911/2022 – Looking west on the “Grand Plaza of Exhibition City,” where Princes’ Blvd at Manitoba Dr intersect today. The covered Gooderham Fountain in the centre was presented for the 1911 CNE. Notice the Horticulture Building on the left and the Administration Building, also known as the Press Building, on the right. In 1958, the Princess Margaret Fountain was installed and is located approximately 31 m or 100 ft southeast of where the Gooderham Fountain once stood (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 942)

1958/2022 – Looking north from Humbervale Blvd towards Tamblyn Drugstore, once located on the northwest corner of Bloor St W and Willingdon Blvd in The Kingsway area
1958/2022 – Looking north from Humbervale Blvd towards Tamblyn Drugstore, once located on the northwest corner of Bloor St W and Willingdon Blvd in The Kingsway area (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 7975)

1937/2022 – Looking southwest on Bloor St W, just east of Jane St towards Tamblyn Drugstore, once located at 2445 Bloor St W in the Bloor West Village neighbourhood
1937/2022 – Looking southwest on Bloor St W, just east of Jane St towards Tamblyn Drugstore, once located at 2445 Bloor St W in the Bloor West Village neighbourhood (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 4589)

2022/1930s – Looking southeast towards Tamblyn Drugstore, once located at 725 Yonge St, between Hayden St and Bloor St E in Downtown Toronto
2022/1930s – Looking southeast towards Tamblyn Drugstore, once located at 725 Yonge St, between Hayden St and Bloor St E in Downtown Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 52)

1959/2022 – Looking southwest towards Tamblyn Drugstore, once located at Avenue Rd and Davenport Rd in The Annex/Yorkville neighbourhoods of Toronto
1959/2022 – Looking southwest towards Tamblyn Drugstore, once located at Avenue Rd and Davenport Rd in The Annex/Yorkville neighbourhoods of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Series 65, File 56, ID 33)

1970s/2022 – Looking southeast towards Tamblyn Drugs, once located at Yonge St and St Clair Ave E in the Deer Park neighbourhood
1970s/2022 – Looking southeast towards Tamblyn Drugs, once located at Yonge St and St Clair Ave E in the Deer Park neighbourhood (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 338, Item 14)

1980s/2022 - Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and St Clair Ave W, in the Deer Park neighbourhood of Toronto. 2 St Clair Ave W was once home to CFRB Radio 1010
1980s/2022 – Looking northwest towards the corner of Yonge St and St Clair Ave W, in the Deer Park neighbourhood of Toronto. 2 St Clair Ave W was once home to CFRB Radio 1010 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 192, Item 5)

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