Past & Present – Part 10

June 1974/March 1975 - Hollywood Theatre was once located at 1519 Yonge St, north of St Clair St on the east side
June 1974/March 1975 – Hollywood Theatre was once located at 1519 Yonge St, north of St Clair St on the east side (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 1, Item 10 & 12)

2022/1915 - Looking southeast from Dundas St W and Abbott Ave towards the Wallace Avenue Footbridge. Built in 1907, the bridge was constructed to give pedestrians access between the two streets in an area with a busy railway corridor running through it
2022/1915 – Looking southeast from Dundas St W and Abbott Ave towards the Wallace Avenue Footbridge. Built in 1907, the bridge was constructed to give pedestrians access between the two streets in an area with a busy railway corridor running through it (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 1874)

1937/2021 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Gerrard St E. Once the Coronet Theatre, originally named Biltmore Savoy Theatre occupied the corner
1937/2021 – Looking northeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Gerrard St E. Once the Coronet Theatre, originally named Biltmore Savoy Theatre occupied the corner (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 1486)

1952/2020 – The Alumnae Theatre Company in the former Berkeley Street Fire Hall No. 4 at 70 Berkeley St and Adelaide St E, on the southwest corner in the St Lawrence neighbourhood. Built in 1905, architect Alexander Frank Wickson designed the fire hall in the Edwardian Classical style. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973
1952/2020 – The Alumnae Theatre Company in the former Berkeley Street Fire Hall No. 4 at 70 Berkeley St and Adelaide St E, on the southwest corner in the St Lawrence neighbourhood. Built in 1905, architect Alexander Frank Wickson designed the fire hall in the Edwardian Classical style. The building received heritage status from the city in 1973 (Toronto Public Library R-2812)

1919/2021 - The Danforth Music Hall, originally Allen's Danforth Theatre, is located at 147 Danforth Ave in the Riverdale neighbourhood. Built in 1919 for the Allen brothers, architects Hymes, Feldman & Watson designed the structure in the Georgian Revival style. The building received heritage designation from the city in 1985
1919/2021 – The Danforth Music Hall, originally Allen’s Danforth Theatre, is located at 147 Danforth Ave in the Riverdale neighbourhood. Built in 1919 for the Allen brothers, architects Hymes, Feldman & Watson designed the structure in the Georgian Revival style. The building received heritage designation from the city in 1985 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 712)

1890s/2021 - The Confederation Life Building is located at ‪20 Richmond St E, between Yonge St and Victoria St in Downtown Toronto. Built in 1890/92, architects Knox, Elliot & Jarvis designed the building in the Romanesque Revival and French Gothic elements. It was home to the Confederation Life Association until 1955. The building received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 1973 and Ontario Heritage Trust in 1975
1890s/2021 – The Confederation Life Building is located at ‪20 Richmond St E, between Yonge St and Victoria St in Downtown Toronto. Built in 1890/92, architects Knox, Elliot & Jarvis designed the building in the Romanesque Revival and French Gothic elements. It was home to the Confederation Life Association until 1955. The building received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 1973 and Ontario Heritage Trust in 1975 (Toronto Public Library E9-90)

2020/1990s/1928 – Originally the Occident Hall, later the Holiday Tavern, The Big Bop and today CB2 (Crate & Barrel) occupies the space at 651 Queen St W and Bathurst St, on the southeast corner in the Fashion District. Built in 1876 for the Masonic Order, architects McCaw & Lennox designed the building in the Second Empire style. The structure received heritage status from the city in 2016 – notice that the third floor and mansard roof were removed circa 1950
2020/1990s/1928 – Originally the Occident Hall, later the Holiday Tavern, The Big Bop and today CB2 (Crate & Barrel) occupies the space at 651 Queen St W and Bathurst St, on the southeast corner in the Fashion District. Built in 1876 for the Masonic Order, architects McCaw & Lennox designed the building in the Second Empire style. The structure received heritage status from the city in 2016 – notice that the third floor and mansard roof were removed circa 1950 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 1162 & Series 1465, File 51, ID 79)

Circa 1912/2021 – Looking southwest towards Victoria St and Richmond St E – today Cambridge Suites Toronto occupies the space
Circa 1912/2021 – Looking southwest towards Victoria St and Richmond St E – today Cambridge Suites Toronto occupies the space (Toronto Public Library B13-75)

1922/2021 – Looking west from Richmond St E and Berti St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood. Notice the Sons of England Benefit Society was once at the northwest corner today the site is home to Toronto EMS Station 40. Next to it is the still-existing 50 Richmond St E and in the distance, the Confederation Life Building
1922/2021 – Looking west from Richmond St E and Berti St in the St Lawrence neighbourhood. Notice the Sons of England Benefit Society was once at the northwest corner today the site is home to Toronto EMS Station 40. Next to it is the still-existing 50 Richmond St E and in the distance, the Confederation Life Building (Toronto Public Library R-6000)

1884/2021 - The Robertson House at 291 Sherbourne St is a City of Toronto shelter. Built in 1858, it was once the residence of J Ross Roberson and his family. The house received heritage status from the city in 1981. J Ross Robertson was a publisher, journalist, historian, politician and philanthropist. He founded the Daily Telegram in 1866 and the Evening Telegram in 1876
1884/2021 – The Robertson House at 291 Sherbourne St is a City of Toronto shelter. Built in 1858, it was once the residence of J Ross Roberson and his family. The house received heritage status from the city in 1981. J Ross Robertson was a publisher, journalist, historian, politician and philanthropist. He founded the Daily Telegram in 1866 and the Evening Telegram in 1876 (Toronto Public Library r-3714)

1930s/2021 - Looking southeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Dundas Sq. Built in 1917/18, architect John Chorley Westervelt designed the structure in the Beaux-Arts Classicism style for Child's Restaurants and offices. It was later home to Friar's Tavern, then Hard Rock Café. Today Shoppers Drug Mart and a small area for Friar's Music Museum occupy the space. The building received heritage status from the city in 1990
1930s/2021 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Yonge St and Dundas Sq. Built in 1917/18, architect John Chorley Westervelt designed the structure in the Beaux-Arts Classicism style for Child’s Restaurants and offices. It was later home to Friar’s Tavern, then Hard Rock Café. Today Shoppers Drug Mart and a small area for Friar’s Music Museum occupy the space. The building received heritage status from the city in 1990 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds1257, Series 1057, Item 49)

2021/1926 - Native Canadian Centre of Toronto (founded in 1962) is located at 16 Spadina Rd, north of Bloor St W on the west side in The Annex neighbourhood. Built in 1928/29, the Toronto Bible College and McNicol Hall once occupied the building. Architects Mathers & Haldenby designed the Tudor Revival building, which received heritage status from the city in 1976
2021/1926 – Native Canadian Centre of Toronto (founded in 1962) is located at 16 Spadina Rd, north of Bloor St W on the west side in The Annex neighbourhood. Built in 1928/29, the Toronto Bible College and McNicol Hall once occupied the building. Architects Mathers & Haldenby designed the Tudor Revival building, which received heritage status from the city in 1976 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 17954)

2021/1980 - Originally Dovercourt-St Pauls Presbyterian Church, today Igreja Presbiteriana de Língua Portuguesa is located at 700 Dovercourt Rd and Hepbourne St on the northwest corner in the Dufferin Grove neighbourhood. Built in 1905 by architect William R. Gregg and received heritage status from the city in 1990
2021/1980 – Originally Dovercourt-St Pauls Presbyterian Church, today Igreja Presbiteriana de Língua Portuguesa is located at 700 Dovercourt Rd and Hepbourne St on the northwest corner in the Dufferin Grove neighbourhood. Built in 1905 by architect William R. Gregg and received heritage status from the city in 1990 (Toronto Public Library LOCHIST-BL-077)

1972/2020 – Once at the northeast corner of Queen St E and Mutual St, in the Garden District neighbourhood of Toronto
1972/2020 – Once at the northeast corner of Queen St E and Mutual St, in the Garden District neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 53, Item 35)

1980/2021 – Originally built in 1912 for the St Patrick's Market at 238 Queen St W – designed by George Frederick W Price, city architect, the structure received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 1975
1980/2021 – Originally built in 1912 for the St Patrick’s Market at 238 Queen St W – designed by George Frederick W Price, city architect, the structure received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 1975 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 70, Item 22)

1950/2020 - St Mary's Roman Catholic Church is located at 130 Bathurst St, between Adelaide St W and Portugal Sq in the Niagara neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1885/88, architect Joseph Connolly designed the church in the Gothic Revival style – the building received heritage status from the City in 1973 and Ontario Heritage Trust in 1982
1950/2020 – St Mary’s Roman Catholic Church is located at 130 Bathurst St, between Adelaide St W and Portugal Sq in the Niagara neighbourhood of Toronto. Built in 1885/88, architect Joseph Connolly designed the church in the Gothic Revival style – the building received heritage status from the City in 1973 and Ontario Heritage Trust in 1982 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 380, Item 110)

1971/2021 – The building at 100 Adelaide St E in the St Lawrence neighbourhood was once home to Dominion Typewriters – now the Pearl Diver Restaurant
1971/2021 – The building at 100 Adelaide St E in the St Lawrence neighbourhood was once home to Dominion Typewriters – now the Pearl Diver Restaurant (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 615, Item 14)

1929/2020 - Colborne Lodge in High Park, the former home of John and Jemima Howard, is located in the south end of High Park, just north of The Queensway. Built in 1837 by John Howard, the home is a classic example of the Regency-style cottage and today is a city-operated museum
1929/2020 – Colborne Lodge in High Park, the former home of John and Jemima Howard, is located in the south end of High Park, just north of The Queensway. Built in 1837 by John Howard, the home is a classic example of the Regency-style cottage and today is a city-operated museum (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1548, Series 393, Item 22333)

1928/2021 - Toronto Fire Station 424 is located at 462 Runnymede Rd and MacGregor Ave, on the northwest corner in the Runnymede/High Park North neighbourhood - built in 1927
1928/2021 – Toronto Fire Station 424 is located at 462 Runnymede Rd and MacGregor Ave, on the northwest corner in the Runnymede/High Park North neighbourhood – built in 1927 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 362)

1980s/2021 – The building at 275 Yonge St was constructed in 1868 for John Bugg and received heritage status from the City in 1973 – today home to 3 Brewers and located just south of Dundas Sq in Downtown Toronto
1980s/2021 – The building at 275 Yonge St was constructed in 1868 for John Bugg and received heritage status from the City in 1973 – today home to 3 Brewers and located just south of Dundas Sq in Downtown Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 615, Item 14)

1954/2020 – Looking east from Bay and College Sts towards Yonge St. In the vintage photo - notice the Eaton Store on the right when it extended to Bay St and the old YMCA on the left before The Y moved to 20 Grosvenor St in the 1980s
1954/2020 – Looking east from Bay and College Sts towards Yonge St. In the vintage photo – notice the Eaton Store on the right when it extended to Bay St and the old YMCA on the left before The Y moved to 20 Grosvenor St in the 1980s (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 1756)

1880s/2021 - Epiphany & St Mark Anglican Church, originally St Mark's Church, is located at 201 Cowan Ave, south of Queen St W in Toronto's Little Tibet/Parkdale neighbourhood - built in 1881, architects Langley, Langley and Burke designed the church in the Gothic Revival style
1880s/2021 – Epiphany & St Mark Anglican Church, originally St Mark’s Church, is located at 201 Cowan Ave, south of Queen St W in Toronto’s Little Tibet/Parkdale neighbourhood – built in 1881, architects Langley, Langley and Burke designed the church in the Gothic Revival style (Toronto Public Library R-5558)

1953/2020 - Montgomery's Inn is located at 4709 Dundas St W between Montgomery Rd and Islington Ave in The Kingsway neighbourhood. Built around 1830 by Thomas and Margaret Montgomery, they operated the inn on their farm. From 1946-62, the building served as Kingsway Presbyterian Church and in 1975 became a public museum
1953/2020 – Montgomery’s Inn is located at 4709 Dundas St W between Montgomery Rd and Islington Ave in The Kingsway neighbourhood. Built around 1830 by Thomas and Margaret Montgomery, they operated the inn on their farm. From 1946-62, the building served as Kingsway Presbyterian Church and in 1975 became a public museum (Toronto Public Library R-5094)

2021/mid-1920s – Looking east along Danforth Ave towards Eastminster United Church, originally Danforth Avenue Methodist Church located at 310 Danforth Ave and Jackman Ave - built in 1923/24, architect George Martel Miller designed the church in the Gothic Revival style
2021/mid-1920s – Looking east along Danforth Ave towards Eastminster United Church, originally Danforth Avenue Methodist Church located at 310 Danforth Ave and Jackman Ave – built in 1923/24, architect George Martel Miller designed the church in the Gothic Revival style (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 2207)

2021/1958 – Looking southwest towards Our Lady of Sorrows Church located at 3055 Bloor St W and Cliveden Ave in The Kingsway neighbourhood - built in 1940/41, architect James Haffa designed the church
2021/1958 – Looking southwest towards Our Lady of Sorrows Church located at 3055 Bloor St W and Cliveden Ave in The Kingsway neighbourhood – built in 1940/41, architect James Haffa designed the church (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 7950)

1956/2021 - Originally College Street Presbyterian Church, later College Street United Church, located at 456 College St and Bathurst St, on the northwest corner - the Channel Club condo was built around the church and completed in the early 1990s
1956/2021 – Originally College Street Presbyterian Church, later College Street United Church, located at 456 College St and Bathurst St, on the northwest corner – the Channel Club condo was built around the church and completed in the early 1990s (Toronto Public Library S1-3640)

Late 1980s/2021 - During construction of The Channel Club condo around the College Street United Church located at 456 College St and Bathurst St, on the northwest corner
Late 1980s/2021 – During construction of The Channel Club condo around the College Street United Church located at 456 College St and Bathurst St, on the northwest corner (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 752, Item 8)

1927/2021 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Bay St and Bloor St W in the Yorkville neighbourhood - today it's home to the Manulife Centre
1927/2021 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Bay St and Bloor St W in the Yorkville neighbourhood – today it’s home to the Manulife Centre (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 9970)

2021/1969 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Bay St and Bloor St W in the Yorkville neighbourhood – once the Bloor Building, today it's home to the Manulife Centre
2021/1969 – Looking southeast towards the corner of Bay St and Bloor St W in the Yorkville neighbourhood – once the Bloor Building, today it’s home to the Manulife Centre (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 2, ID 38)

2021/1946 - Looking southwest towards the Palais Royale from Lake Shore Blvd W, notice the sign for Bert Niosi and his Orchestra - built in 1921/22, the structure was designed by architects Chapman, Oxley & Bishop and received heritage status by the city in 1974
2021/1946 – Looking southwest towards the Palais Royale from Lake Shore Blvd W, notice the sign for Bert Niosi and his Orchestra – built in 1921/22, the structure was designed by architects Chapman, Oxley & Bishop and received heritage status by the city in 1974 (Toronto Public Library TSPA-0110392F)

2020/1913- The Yonge Richmond Centre is located at 151 Yonge St and Richmond St E, on the southeast corner. It was once the site of the Hobberlin Building. Built in 1907, architect EJ Lennox designed the building for a store, warehouse and offices - the Hobberlin Building was demolished in the mid-1980s
2020/1913- The Yonge Richmond Centre is located at 151 Yonge St and Richmond St E, on the southeast corner. It was once the site of the Hobberlin Building. Built in 1907, architect EJ Lennox designed the building for a store, warehouse and offices – the Hobberlin Building was demolished in the mid-1980s (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 2038)

1987/2020 - Hobberlin Building was once at Yonge St and Richmond St E, on the southeast corner. Built in 1907 for a store, warehouse and offices, it was demolished in 1987. Today the corner is home to the Yonge Richmond Centre 151 Yonge St
1987/2020 – Hobberlin Building was once at Yonge St and Richmond St E, on the southeast corner. Built in 1907 for a store, warehouse and offices, it was demolished in 1987. Today the corner is home to the Yonge Richmond Centre 151 Yonge St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 3, ID 148)

1926/2021 - Bloor St W and Bay St, on the northeast corner in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto – in the 1920s, the corner was home to Mulberry Inn and Tea Rooms at 52 Bloor St W
1926/2021 – Bloor St W and Bay St, on the northeast corner in the Yorkville neighbourhood of Toronto – in the 1920s, the corner was home to Mulberry Inn and Tea Rooms at 52 Bloor St W (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 7076)

2021/1955 - Yorkminster Park Baptist Church is located at 1585 Yonge St and Heath St E on the northeast corner in the Deer Park neighbourhood of Toronto - built in 1927/28, architects George, Moorhouse & King designed the church in the Gothic Revival style
2021/1955 – Yorkminster Park Baptist Church is located at 1585 Yonge St and Heath St E on the northeast corner in the Deer Park neighbourhood of Toronto – built in 1927/28, architects George, Moorhouse & King designed the church in the Gothic Revival style (Toronto Public Library R-2061)

2020/1920s - Originally built for Northern Aluminum Co Ltd in 1919/20, it was later renamed ALCAN Ltd in 1925. Today the Auto BLDG is home to the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), located at 158 Sterling Rd in the Junction Triangle neighbourhood. Architects Woodman & Cubbidge designed the ten-storey reinforced concrete industrial warehouse
2020/1920s – Originally built for Northern Aluminum Co Ltd in 1919/20, it was later renamed ALCAN Ltd in 1925. Today the Auto BLDG is home to the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), located at 158 Sterling Rd in the Junction Triangle neighbourhood. Architects Woodman & Cubbidge designed the ten-storey reinforced concrete industrial warehouse (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 7203)

2021/1907 - The Grange, a national historic site, is located at the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) at 317 Dundas St W – built in 1817 for D’Arcy Boulton Jr and his wife Sarah Anne, the home's Neoclassical style architecture is based on 18th-century Georgian tradition
2021/1907 – The Grange, a national historic site, is located at the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) at 317 Dundas St W – built in 1817 for D’Arcy Boulton Jr and his wife Sarah Anne, the home’s Neoclassical style architecture is based on 18th-century Georgian tradition (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 325A)

2020/1922 - Colborne Lodge was the home of John and Jemima Howard, located in the south end of High Park, just north of The Queensway. Built in 1837 by John Howard, the home is a classic example of a Regency-style cottage – the historic lodge is a City-operated museum
2020/1922 – Colborne Lodge was the home of John and Jemima Howard, located in the south end of High Park, just north of The Queensway. Built in 1837 by John Howard, the home is a classic example of a Regency-style cottage – the historic lodge is a City-operated museum (Toronto Public Library R-1695)

2019/1925 – A winter scene at Colborne Lodge, once the home of John and Jemima Howard, the Regency-style cottage is located at the south end of High Park - built in 1837, today the historic lodge is a City-operated museum
2019/1925 – A winter scene at Colborne Lodge, once the home of John and Jemima Howard, the Regency-style cottage is located at the south end of High Park – built in 1837, today the historic lodge is a City-operated museum (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1548, Series 393, Item 20196)

1890/2021 – Built in 1887/88 for the Bathurst Street Methodist Church, later known as the Bathurst Street Theatre and today the Randolph Theatre, at 736 Bathurst St and Lennox St, on the southwest corner in the Mirvish Village neighbourhood - architects Gordon & Helliwell designed the church in the Gothic revival style at the cost of $30,000
1890/2021 – Built in 1887/88 for the Bathurst Street Methodist Church, later known as the Bathurst Street Theatre and today the Randolph Theatre, at 736 Bathurst St and Lennox St, on the southwest corner in the Mirvish Village neighbourhood – architects Gordon & Helliwell designed the church in the Gothic revival style at the cost of $30,000 (Toronto Public Library B6-14A)

1976/2019 – Paul Kane House, the former home of the Canadian artist, is located at 56 Wellesley St E. Built in 1853, the Kane family owned the home until 1903. A church hall for many years, the city purchased the property in 1978, and today the heritage house is within a parkette. It was made possible by the efforts of local citizens and heritage organizations
1976/2019 – Paul Kane House, the former home of the Canadian artist, is located at 56 Wellesley St E. Built in 1853, the Kane family owned the home until 1903. A church hall for many years, the city purchased the property in 1978, and today the heritage house is within a parkette. It was made possible by the efforts of local citizens and heritage organizations (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 616, Item 7)

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