Metropolitan United Church – The Great Cathedral of Methodism

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2021 - Looking towards the south and east facades of the beautiful Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E in Toronto. It was considered one of the finest Methodist churches in the world and was built in 1870/72
2021 – Looking towards the south and east facades of the beautiful Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E in Toronto

Metropolitan United Church, originally Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church, is located at 56 Queen St E (bordered by Bond St, Shuter St and Church St) in the Garden District of downtown Toronto.

The Church’s Early Beginnings

Metropolitan United Church is a descendant of the first Methodist chapel built in 1818 on the corner of King St W and Jordan St. It was situated where the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building stands today. The one-storey wooden place of worship was built by Elder Ryan, who had to mortgage $300 of his property to pay for its construction. The chapel was known as York Methodist Episcopal Chapel and later King Street Methodist Episcopal.

In 1832, the congregation moved to their new church, once on the southeast corner of Adelaide St E and Toronto St. The church was initially called Newgate Street Methodist Episcopal. When the street name was changed, it became Adelaide Street Methodist Episcopal.

In 1868, the congregation acquired the property known as McGill Square on the north side of Queen St E, between Church St and Bond St.

Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church

1873 - The Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church at 56 Queen St E. The church was elaborately decorated and featured a patterned slate roof with iron cresting. Notice the steeple of St Michael's Cathedral Basilica in the background
1873 – The Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church at 56 Queen St E. The church was elaborately decorated and featured a patterned slate roof with iron cresting (Toronto Public Library R-5393)

Built in 1870/72, architects Henry Langley and his brother Edward designed the church in the High Victorian Gothic style. The structure is clad in buff brick with cut-stone dressings. The main entrance is on the south side, through the 60 m or 190 ft tall tower, which has been elaborately decorated with angel sculptures, traceried windows and octagonal turrets. The ridge of the patterned slate roof was crested with cast iron ornaments.

The interior featured a gallery running around its entirety, beautiful woodwork, stained glass windows and crimson upholstered pews for 1,800 parishioners. The first service was held in April 1872. There were over 3,000 in attendance. Every seat was taken, and the aisles were filled. It was considered one of the finest Methodist churches in the world.

Upon completion, the building, furnishings and grounds were valued at $135,000. Within the 1870s, an iron fence designed by Henry Langley was added around the property.

Historic Highlights

The inaugural service of the Methodist Church of Canada in 1874 and the World Ecumenical Methodist Conference meetings in 1911 was held at the church.

In 1925, when Presbyterian, Methodist, and Congregational churches joined together to establish the United Church of Canada, their first General Council took place at the church, which was renamed Metropolitan United.

The Massey Family

Members of the congregation included Lillian Treble Massey and Chester D Massey, the children of Hart Massey, a wealthy industrialist and the builder of Massey Hall.

In 1905, Lillian donated what was said to be one of the largest organs in the world to the church. About a year later, her brother Chester donated the funds to build the Parsonage. It was built in 1906/07 and is located on the southeast corner of Shuter St and Bond St. The Parsonage is designed in Neo-Gothic style by the architect firm Sproatt & Rolph. In 1922, Chester also gifted the church a 23-bell carillon. Thousands lined the streets to hear its first chimes.

The Fire, Reconstruction & Reopening

1950 – Looking north from Queen St E towards the main entrance of the Metropolitan United Church
1950 – Looking north from Queen St E towards the main entrance of the Metropolitan United Church (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 380, Item 120)

In January 1928, a blaze swept through the church. It left a fire-scarred pile of ruins with only the south portions of the church, including the tower and spire, still standing. Just a year prior, the church had undergone redecoration and restoration. The organ and many of the stained-glass windows were also destroyed in the fire.

Rebuilding on the same foundations began almost immediately, and during that time, parishioners attended services at the Elm Street Church, Tivoli Theatre and Massey Hall.

The church was entirely renovated under architect John Gibb Morton. He combined the surviving late 19th-century High Victorian Gothic style portion of the south façade (main entrance, tower and porches on the east and west sides) with the rebuilt portions influenced by early 20th-century Neo-Gothic architecture.

The brickwork was resurfaced, and its interior was just as beautiful, with accommodation for 900 people, a single balcony, a vaulted roof, glasswork and woodwork details all created by skilled craftspeople. The church reopened for worship in December 1929. A 7,200-pipe organ was installed the following year.

Throughout the Years & the Church Today

In the 1960s, there was a decline in attendance. In 1970, it was suggested to sell the church structure and land; however, the congregation voted to save the church from demolition.

Today, the Metropolitan United Church continues to serve the community’s needs and welcomes everyone. Its Sunday services are also live-streamed throughout the world.

Did You Know?

2023 – One of two carved stone angels at the main entrance of Metropolitan United Church. The banner the angel is holding reads: "Worthy the lamb that was slain"
2023 – One of two carved stone angels at the main entrance of Metropolitan United Church. The banner the angel is holding reads: “Worthy the lamb that was slain”
  • The land the church sits on is a part of 100 acres acquired by Captain John McGill from the Crown in 1809. Before the church’s construction, it was known as McGill Square.
  • The church’s cornerstone was laid in 1870 by Rev Egerton Ryerson.
  • Metropolitan United Church is in a park-like setting, with St Michael’s Cathedral Basilica immediately to the north and The Cathedral Church of St James a few blocks southeast.
  • The church building received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 1973.
  • Today, the organ has 8,233 pipes. The smallest is the size of a pencil, and the largest is 9.7 m or 32 ft in height.

Metropolitan United Church Photos   

1870s – Looking northeast towards Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church, today's Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E, between Bond St and Church St in the Garden District of Toronto. Notice St Michael's Cathedral Basilica is in the background
1870s – Looking northeast towards Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church, today’s Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E, between Bond St and Church St in the Garden District of Toronto. Notice St Michael’s Cathedral Basilica is in the background (Toronto Public Library R-5389)
2023 – Metropolitan United Church was originally called Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church. Queen St E, Bond St, Shuter St and Church St border the downtown Toronto property
2023 – Metropolitan United Church was originally called Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church. Queen St E, Bond St, Shuter St and Church St border the downtown Toronto property
1872 – Looking southwest towards Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church on Queen St E, from Church St. The photo was taken nearing construction completion. Today the church is called Metropolitan United Church
1872 – Looking southwest towards Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church on Queen St E, from Church St. The photo was taken nearing construction completion. Today the church is called Metropolitan United Church (Toronto Public Library R-5390)
1873 - The Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church at 56 Queen St E. The church was elaborately decorated and featured a patterned slate roof with iron cresting. Notice the steeple of St Michael's Cathedral Basilica in the background
1873 – The Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church at 56 Queen St E. The church was elaborately decorated and featured a patterned slate roof with iron cresting. Notice the steeple of St Michael’s Cathedral Basilica in the background (Toronto Public Library R-5393)
1890 – Looking north on Bond St from Queen St E towards Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church with St Michael's Cathedral Basilica in the distance
1890 – Looking north on Bond St from Queen St E towards Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church with St Michael’s Cathedral Basilica in the distance (Toronto Public Library R-5420)
1890s – The original interior of Metropolitan Methodist Church once had a gallery running around its entirety
1890s – The original interior of Metropolitan Methodist Church once had a gallery running around its entirety (Toronto Public Library R-5444)
1905 - The interior of the Metropolitan Methodist Church. Notice the gallery, organ and woodwork. The organ was donated by Lillian Massey Treble, whose father built Massey Hall
1905 – The interior of the Metropolitan Methodist Church. Notice the gallery, organ and woodwork. The organ was donated by Lillian Massey Treble, whose father built Massey Hall (Toronto Public Library R-5425)
1907 - Looking northwest from Church St and Queen St E towards the Metropolitan Methodist Church. The tower of the beautiful church stands 60 m tall. Notice the property once had an iron fence around it. The steeple at the far right belongs to St Michael's Cathedral Basilica
1907 – Looking northwest from Church St and Queen St E towards the Metropolitan Methodist Church. The tower of the beautiful church stands 60 m tall. Notice the property once had an iron fence around it. The steeple at the far right belongs to St Michael’s Cathedral Basilica (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 3189)
2023 – Looking northwest towards Metropolitan United Church from Queen St E and Church St. Notice St Michael's Cathedral Basilica steeple through the trees on the right
2023 – Looking northwest towards Metropolitan United Church from Queen St E and Church St. Notice St Michael’s Cathedral Basilica steeple through the trees on the right
1920 - Metropolitan Methodist Church on Queen St E, between Bond St and Church St in Toronto. Architects Langley & Langley designed the church in the High Victorian Gothic style
1920 – Metropolitan Methodist Church on Queen St E, between Bond St and Church St in Toronto. Architects Langley & Langley designed the church in the High Victorian Gothic style (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 136b)
January 30, 1928 - The charred interior of Metropolitan United Church after a fire swept through the building
January 30, 1928 – The charred interior of Metropolitan United Church after a fire swept through the building (Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 12600)
February 22, 1929 – Looking southwest towards the rebuilding of Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E, between Bond St and Church St. In the prior year, a fire swept through the church. Only the south portions of the church, including the tower and spire, were left standing
February 22, 1929 – Looking southwest towards the rebuilding of Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E, between Bond St and Church St. In the prior year, a fire swept through the church. Only the south portions of the church, including the tower and spire, were left standing (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 15777)
2023 – Looking towards the rear of Metropolitan United Church from Church St, south of Shuter St. The building on the far right is St Michael's Hospital
2023 – Looking towards the rear of Metropolitan United Church from Church St, south of Shuter St. The building on the far right is St Michael’s Hospital
November 1929 - Scaffolding being removed from the tower of Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E after the church was rebuilt with designs by architect John Gibb Morton. A fire in January 1928 had destroyed much of the church
November 1929 – Scaffolding being removed from the tower of Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E after the church was rebuilt with designs by architect John Gibb Morton. A fire in January 1928 had destroyed much of the church (Toronto Public Library TSPA_0111181F)
December 13, 1929 – During the reconstruction of the interior of Metropolitan United Church. The church reopened for services just a few days later
December 13, 1929 – During the reconstruction of the interior of Metropolitan United Church. The church reopened for services just a few days later (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 19102)
1950 – Looking north from Queen St E towards the main entrance of the Metropolitan United Church
1950 – Looking north from Queen St E towards the main entrance of the Metropolitan United Church (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1128, Series 380, Item 120)
1956 - Looking north from a parking lot across the street from Metropolitan United Church. The spire of St Michael's Cathedral Basilica is in the background on the left
1956 – Looking north from a parking lot across the street from Metropolitan United Church. The spire of St Michael’s Cathedral Basilica is in the background on the left (Toronto Public Library R-5387)
1972 – Looking northeast across Queen St E from Bond St towards Metropolitan United Church. The church structure received heritage status the following year
1972 – Looking northeast across Queen St E from Bond St towards Metropolitan United Church. The church structure received heritage status the following year (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 13, Item 24)
1994 – An aerial view looking north from Queen St E towards Metropolitan United Church, its property and the surrounding area
1994 – An aerial view looking north from Queen St E towards Metropolitan United Church, its property and the surrounding area (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 715, Item 4)
2021 - Looking towards the south facade and entrance of Metropolitan United Church on Queen St E, between Bond St and Church St in the Garden District of downtown Toronto
2021 – Looking towards the south facade and entrance of Metropolitan United Church on Queen St E, between Bond St and Church St in the Garden District of downtown Toronto
2021 - Looking towards the south and east facades of the beautiful Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E in Toronto. It was considered one of the finest Methodist churches in the world and was built in 1870/72
2021 – Looking towards the south and east facades of the beautiful Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E in Toronto. It was considered one of the finest Methodist churches in the world and was built in 1870/72
2021 – The main entrance through the tower of Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E. Notice the limestone steps, the wooden double doors, the single octofoil window flanked by quatrefoil windows and the tracery around the pointed-arch windows
2021 – The main entrance through the tower of Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E. Notice the limestone steps, the wooden double doors, the single octofoil window flanked by quatrefoil windows and the tracery around the pointed-arch windows
2023 – One of two carved stone angels at the main entrance of Metropolitan United Church. The banner the angel is holding reads: "Glory to God in the highest"
2023 – One of two carved stone angels at the main entrance of Metropolitan United Church. The banner the angel is holding reads: “Glory to God in the highest”
2023 – One of two carved stone angels at the main entrance of Metropolitan United Church. The banner the angel is holding reads: "Worthy the lamb that was slain"
2023 – One of two carved stone angels at the main entrance of Metropolitan United Church. The banner the angel is holding reads: “Worthy the lamb that was slain”
2021 – The main entrance of Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E. Notice over the wooden double doors, the single octofoil window is flanked by quatrefoil windows. Two carved angels support the stone gable, and at its point is a poppyhead finial
2021 – The main entrance of Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E. Notice over the wooden double doors, the single octofoil window is flanked by quatrefoil windows. Two carved angels support the stone gable, and at its point is a poppyhead finial
2023 – The top of the tower at Metropolitan United Church. Notice the brick corbels, band courses, lancet windows, scalloped louvres and detailed corner towers
2023 – The top of the tower at Metropolitan United Church. Notice the brick corbels, band courses, lancet windows, scalloped louvres and detailed corner towers
2023 – The intricate details of the top of Metropolitan United Church's tower. Notice the scalloped louvres, the pairs of pointed-arched openings, the corner towers and spirelets
2023 – The intricate details of the top of Metropolitan United Church’s tower. Notice the scalloped louvres, the pairs of pointed-arched openings, the corner towers and spirelets
2023 – Stained glass windows with stone tracery at Metropolitan United Church
2023 – Stained glass windows with stone tracery at Metropolitan United Church
2021 – Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E was originally known as Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church. The church was constructed in 1870/72 and rebuilt in 1928/29 due to a fire
2021 – Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E was originally known as Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church. The church was constructed in 1870/72 and rebuilt in 1928/29 due to a fire
2020 – Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E is in a park-like setting in an area once known as McGill Square. It was named after Captain John McGill, who acquired a total of 100 acres, which includes this property, from the Crown in 1809
2020 – Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E is in a park-like setting in an area once known as McGill Square. It was named after Captain John McGill, who acquired a total of 100 acres, which includes this property, from the Crown in 1809
2021 – Looking northwest towards the stately Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E. The structure is clad in buff brick with cut-stone dressings
2021 – Looking northwest towards the stately Metropolitan United Church at 56 Queen St E. The structure is clad in buff brick with cut-stone dressings
Sketch of the Metropolitan Methodist Church
Sketch of the Metropolitan Methodist Church (Landmarks of Toronto Volume 4 by J Ross Robertson – 1904)
1870s - Sketch of Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church in McGill Square showing architect Henry Langley
1870s – Sketch of Metropolitan Wesleyan Methodist Church in McGill Square showing architect Henry Langley (Toronto Public Library 2019-14)
2021 – The plaque reads:

Metropolitan United Church

"is the descendant of a small, frame chapel built in 1818 on the corner of King and Jordan Streets, now the site of the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building. Metropolitan Church was erected in 1870, and the interior was rebuilt in 1929 following a disastrous fire. It now stands, together with the church house, as a symbol of Christian witness and service in Downtown Toronto."
2021 – The plaque reads:

Metropolitan United Church

“is the descendant of a small, frame chapel built in 1818 on the corner of King and Jordan Streets, now the site of the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building. Metropolitan Church was erected in 1870, and the interior was rebuilt in 1929 following a disastrous fire. It now stands, together with the church house, as a symbol of Christian witness and service in Downtown Toronto.”
2021 – The plaque reads:

Metropolitan United Church 

"is the descendant of a small, frame chapel built in 1818 on the corner of King and Jordan Streets, now the site of the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building. Metropolitan Church was erected in 1870, and the interior was rebuilt in 1929 following a disastrous fire. It now stands, together with the church house, as a symbol of Christian witness and service in Downtown Toronto."
2021 – The plaque reads:

Metropolitan United Church

“is the descendant of a small, frame chapel built in 1818 on the corner of King and Jordan Streets, now the site of the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building. Metropolitan Church was erected in 1870, and the interior was rebuilt in 1929 following a disastrous fire. It now stands, together with the church house, as a symbol of Christian witness and service in Downtown Toronto.”
2020 – The heritage plaque reads:

Metropolitan United Church 

"This "Cathedral of Methodism" was designed by Henry Langley in the High Victorian Gothic style. The cornerstone was laid by the Rev. Egerton Ryerson, D.D., in 1870, and the church was dedicated in 1872. It replaced an earlier structure at the southeast corner of Adelaide and Toronto Streets. The first missionaries from Canada to Japan were commissioned in this church on May 7, 1873. The inaugural service of the Methodist Church of Canada was held here September 16, 1874. The World Ecumenical Methodist Conference meetings in 1911 and the first General Council of the United Church in 1925 met here. The church was badly damaged by fire in 1928 and rebuilt, incorporating most of the original walls, tower, narthex, and much of the stained glass."

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, Ministry of Culture and Recreation
2020 – The heritage plaque reads:

Metropolitan United Church

“This “Cathedral of Methodism” was designed by Henry Langley in the High Victorian Gothic style. The cornerstone was laid by the Rev. Egerton Ryerson, D.D., in 1870, and the church was dedicated in 1872. It replaced an earlier structure at the southeast corner of Adelaide and Toronto Streets. The first missionaries from Canada to Japan were commissioned in this church on May 7, 1873. The inaugural service of the Methodist Church of Canada was held here September 16, 1874. The World Ecumenical Methodist Conference meetings in 1911 and the first General Council of the United Church in 1925 met here. The church was badly damaged by fire in 1928 and rebuilt, incorporating most of the original walls, tower, narthex, and much of the stained glass.”

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, Ministry of Culture and Recreation
1906 - Postcard of Metropolitan Methodist Church looking southeast from Bond St and Shuter St. Notice the Parsonage had not yet been built
1906 – Postcard of Metropolitan Methodist Church looking southeast from Bond St and Shuter St. Notice the Parsonage had not yet been built (Toronto Public Library PC200)
1911 – Postcard of the Metropolitan Methodist Parsonage at the southeast corner of Shuter St and Bond St with the church in the background. The Parsonage was built and furnished through a donation from Chester Massey
1911 – Postcard of the Metropolitan Methodist Parsonage at the southeast corner of Shuter St and Bond St with the church in the background. The Parsonage was built and furnished through a donation from Chester Massey (Toronto Public Library PC3945)
1972 – Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at the southeast corner of Bond St and Shuter St. The building received heritage status in 1983
1972 – Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at the southeast corner of Bond St and Shuter St. The building received heritage status in 1983 (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 2032, Series 841, File 13, Item 28)
2023 – Looking southeast from Shuter St and Bond St towards the Metropolitan United Parsonage and Community Building with the church in the background
2023 – Looking southeast from Shuter St and Bond St towards the Metropolitan United Parsonage and Community Building with the church in the background
2023 – Looking southeast toward the Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at the corner of Bond St and Shuter St in the Garden District of downtown Toronto. The building was constructed in 1906/07 and designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph
2023 – Looking southeast toward the Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at the corner of Bond St and Shuter St in the Garden District of downtown Toronto. The building was constructed in 1906/07 and designed by architects Sproatt & Rolph
2023 – Looking northwest towards the rear of the Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building located at 55 Bond St. Notice the Paint Your Faith mural by artists Elicser, Mediah, Cher Boogie and Siloette on the east side of the Parsonage. The church in the background is St Michael's Cathedral Basilica
2023 – Looking northwest towards the rear of the Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building located at 55 Bond St. Notice the Paint Your Faith mural by artists Elicser, Mediah, Cher Boogie and Siloette on the east side of the Parsonage. The church in the background is St Michael’s Cathedral Basilica
2022 – The Paint Your Faith mural located on the west exterior of Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at Shuter St and Bond St. The urban art installation was created by street artists Elicser, Mediah, Cher Boogie and Siloette and unveiled in 2009
2022 – The Paint Your Faith mural located on the west exterior of Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at Shuter St and Bond St. The urban art installation was created by street artists Elicser, Mediah, Cher Boogie and Siloette and unveiled in 2009
2022 – Looking west towards the Paint Your Faith mural located on Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at Shuter St and Bond St. Unveiled in 2009, the urban art installation was created by street artists Elicser, Mediah, Cher Boogie and Siloette
2022 – Looking west towards the Paint Your Faith mural located on Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at Shuter St and Bond St. Unveiled in 2009, the urban art installation was created by street artists Elicser, Mediah, Cher Boogie and Siloette
2023 – Looking southwest toward the Paint Your Faith mural on the Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at 55 Bond St. The urban art installation measures 9.1 x 18.2 m or 30 x 60 ft. It was created in 2009 by California artists Chor Boogie, Siloette and Toronto artists Elicser and Mediah
2023 – Looking southwest toward the Paint Your Faith mural on the Metropolitan United Church Parsonage and Community Building at 55 Bond St. The urban art installation measures 9.1 x 18.2 m or 30 x 60 ft. It was created in 2009 by California artists Chor Boogie, Siloette and Toronto artists Elicser and Mediah
2022 - The plaque reads: "The first Methodist Church in Toronto was built upon this site in A. D. 1818"

Metropolitan United Church is the descendant of a small, frame chapel built in 1818 on the corner of King St W and Jordan St. 

The plaque is located on the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building, which today occupies the site at 25 King St W in downtown Toronto
2022 – The plaque reads: “The first Methodist Church in Toronto was built upon this site in A. D. 1818”

Metropolitan United Church is the descendant of a small, frame chapel built in 1818 on the corner of King St W and Jordan St.

The plaque is located on the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building, which today occupies the site at 25 King St W in downtown Toronto
2022 - The plaque for the first Methodist Church in Toronto is located on the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building, which today occupies the site at 25 King St W in downtown Toronto
2022 – The plaque for the first Methodist Church in Toronto is located on the Canadian Bank of Commerce Building, which today occupies the site at 25 King St W in downtown Toronto
SOURCE
  • City of Toronto Heritage Register: 56 Queen St E & 55 Bond St
  • Ontario Heritage Trust: 56 Queen St E
  • Ontario Heritage Trust plaque
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Oct 25, 1856, pg 2
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Aug 25, 1870, pg 4
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Feb 28, 1871, pg 1
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Apr 5, 1872, pg 4
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Apr 8, 1872, pg 1
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Jun 1, 1875, pg 1
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Apr 3, 1922, pg 11
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: Jan 30, 1928, pgs 1 & 11
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Jan 31, 1928, pg 13
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Feb 6, 1928, pg 11
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Nov 26, 1929, pg 13
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Dec 16, 1929, pg 13
  • Metropolitan United Church: Our History
  • Wonder Cafe: Paint Your Faith
  • Landmarks of Toronto: Volume 4 by J Ross Robertson (1904), pgs 348-350
  • Photos: Denise Marie for TorontoJourney416
  • Vintage Photos: City of Toronto Archives & Toronto Public Library

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