Loblaw Groceterias Building – Everything Old is New Again

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January 21, 1929 - Looking towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at the northeast corner of Bathurst St and Fleet St, now 500 Lake Shore Blvd W, in Toronto. The building opened the year before this photo was taken and served as the company's warehouse and head office
January 21, 1929 – Looking towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at the northeast corner of Bathurst St and Fleet St, now 500 Lake Shore Blvd W, in Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 15571)

Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building is located at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W (at Bathurst St on the northeast corner) in the CityPlace neighbourhood of Toronto.

Loblaw Groceterias Warehouse & Head Office

Originally constructed between 1927 and 1928, the 4-storey, Art Deco-style building served as the grocery chain’s warehouse and head office. It also had a single-storey north wing. The building was designed by architects Sparling, Martin & Forbes and was one of the first structures in the area built on land claimed from Lake Ontario by the Toronto Harbour Commission.

Inside the stone and brick-clad building was the most modern facility of its time. There were six huge freight elevators, 22,000 ft of refrigeration piping, an overhead electric tram railway and pneumatic tubes that carried messages between various departments. Products were received and shipped using the adjacent railway line.

Loblaw’s specialty brands were manufactured and packaged in the building – coffee and tea from around the world were blended, cookies and cakes were baked (1.5 tons daily), meats were smoked, and butter was sliced (120,000 pounds weekly). These are just a few products produced at the site that were whisked off to the company’s stores.

When employees took a break, they could spend it in the bowling alley, playing billiards or ping pong in the building’s recreation area.

Through the Years

In 1934, a large extension fronting Bathurst St, north of Housey St, was constructed for the company’s garage and shops. It was designed by Loblaw Groceterias staff architect James A Parrott. A portion of the building was later home to Amsterdam Brewery (this extension was demolished in 2013).

In 1949, the head office was relocated across the street in the former Crosse & Blackwell building. In 1960, the Gardiner Expressway was built directly over the north one-storey portion of the warehouse.

When the company moved their headquarters in the 1970s, the building later became the warehouse and distribution centre of the Daily Bread Food Bank until 2000. The following year, the gem was given heritage status in 2001, but it then sat vacant and was left to the elements.

The West Block

2023 - Looking towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at the northeast corner of 500 Lake Shore Blvd W in Toronto. Construction of the West Block began in the mid-2010s and in 2020, the historic building reopened. It’s home to a Loblaws store, a Shoppers Drug Mart and a Joe Fresh clothing store. Sitting on top of the Art Deco building is a 5-storey glass and steel office annex. The West Block also features two condo towers. Notice the CN Tower in the distance
2023 – Looking towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W in Toronto. Construction of the West Block began in the mid-2010s, and in 2020, the historic building reopened

In 2015, Wittington Properties Limited, owner of the historic property, began redeveloping the 3.5-acre site for a mixed-use complex called the West Block. The one-storey north portion was completely demolished. The bricks and stone on the west, south and some of the east exterior walls of the 4-storey building were carefully dismantled and numbered. They were then restored, and each was replaced in the same original location on the new building.

In 2020, the Loblaw Groceterias building reopened. It’s home to a flagship Loblaws store along with a Shoppers Drug Mart and a Joe Fresh clothing store. Sitting on top of the Art Deco building is a 5-storey glass and steel office annex. The West Block also features two residential condo towers.

About T.P. Loblaw & the Company

Circa 1919 - Loblaw Grocetarias store once at 511 Danforth Ave in the Greektown neighbourhood of Toronto
Circa 1919 – Loblaw Grocetarias store once at 511 Danforth Ave in the Greektown neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 1220)

In 1889, at age 17, Theodore Pringle Loblaw left his family farm in Alliston (90 km northwest of the city) with $20 in his pocket and headed for Toronto. He found work as a grocery clerk for WG Cork, once at 400 King St E, earning $3.00 a week. The young Mr Loblaw saved his money and invested in a store owned by his employer’s son J Milton Cork on College St. The pair formed a partnership and, at the turn of the 20th century, began opening a chain of small grocery stores in the city under the “T. P. Loblaw” name.

In 1919, Loblaw and Cork sold approximately 20 of their 25 stores to the newly-established Dominion Stores Ltd. That same year, the retail duo formed a new chain called Loblaw Groceterias, pioneering a new concept in Toronto – a self-serve, cash-and-carry grocery store with all products under one roof. This innovative new way of grocery shopping meant customers could make their dollar go further, and as Mr Cork put it, “they are willing to serve themselves and make their own deliveries.” The first Loblaw Groceteria was located at 2923 Dundas St W.

The company expanded throughout Ontario and into New York and Illinois. When Theodore Loblaw passed away suddenly in 1933, there were over 100 stores in Ontario alone. In 1947, W Garfield Weston acquired 100,000 shares of Loblaw stock from J Milton Cork, and by the early 1950s, George Weston Ltd had a controlling interest in Loblaw.

Did You Know?

Between 1920 and 1926 - Billboard advertising for Loblaw Groceterias reads: "It's natural to shop where your interests are best served"
Between 1920 and 1926 – Billboard advertising for Loblaw Groceterias reads: “It’s natural to shop where your interests are best served” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 3205)
  • The groceteria system changed how we shopped for food. Before the self-serve “groceteria” system was introduced, products were kept behind counters, and a grocery store clerk would assemble your order for you. While it was a high level of service, it was also labour-intensive.
  • What is the origin of the word “groceteria”? According to Merriam-Webster, in 1913, a firm in Montana patented “groceteria” for a self-service grocery store and based it on the word cafeteria.
  • When Loblaw Groceterias building opened in 1928, its address was on Fleet St W, when the street ran from Yonge St to Strachan Ave. Today, Fleet St runs from Bathurst Ave to Strachan Ave.
  • In the late 1920s, Dominion Stores Ltd had plans to take the option on Loblaw Groceterias Company Ltd stock; however, plans were abandoned in part due to the stock market crash in October 1929.
  • In the early 1930s, the company began selling cellophane-wrapped meats through the self-serve system. Known as “Meateterias,” customers could simply go to the display case and make their choice.
  • In 1939, “Loblaws” signs began replacing the “Loblaw Groceteria” signs on the storefronts.
  • In 1949, the company began opening “super markets” with features like automatic doors, air-conditioning and larger parking lots.
  • The company has introduced product brands, including no name® (1978), President’s Choice® (1984) and PC Organics® (2001).
  • In 2011, a Loblaws store opened in the former Maple Leaf Gardens.
  • In 2014, Shopper’s Drug Mart was acquired by Loblaw.
  • North America’s first self-service grocery store was Piggly Wiggly®, founded in 1916 in Memphis, Tennessee, by Clarence Saunders.

Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited Photos

January 21, 1929 - Looking towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at the northeast corner of Bathurst St and Fleet St, now 500 Lake Shore Blvd W, in Toronto. The building opened the year before this photo was taken and served as the company's warehouse and head office
January 21, 1929 – Looking towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at the northeast corner of Bathurst St and Fleet St, now 500 Lake Shore Blvd W, in Toronto. The building opened the year before this photo was taken and served as the company’s warehouse and head office (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 15571)
2023 - Looking towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at the northeast corner of Lake Shore Blvd W and Bathurst St, in the CityPlace neighbourhood of Toronto. The exterior walls of Loblaw's old headquarters were dismantled in 2015. Brick-by-brick and stone-by-stone, each was replaced in its original location on the new building
2023 – Looking towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at the northeast corner of Lake Shore Blvd W and Bathurst St, in the CityPlace neighbourhood of Toronto. The exterior walls of Loblaw’s old headquarters were dismantled in 2015. Brick-by-brick and stone-by-stone, each was replaced in its original location on the new building
Between 1920 and 1926 - Billboard advertising for Loblaw Groceterias reads: "It's natural to shop where your interests are best served"
Between 1920 and 1926 – Billboard advertising for Loblaw Groceterias reads: “It’s natural to shop where your interests are best served” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 3205)
Late 1920s – Looking east along Lake Shore Blvd W from west of Bathurst St. Maple Leaf Stadium is on the right, Crosse & Blackwell factory in the centre background, and Loblaw Groceterias building is on the left
Late 1920s – Looking east along Lake Shore Blvd W from west of Bathurst St. Maple Leaf Stadium is on the right, Crosse & Blackwell factory in the centre background, and Loblaw Groceterias building is on the left (Toronto Public Library 942-1-16)
2023 - The Loblaws Clock dated back to the 1930s and reads: "Loblaws Saves You Time & Money" and "Enjoy Loblaws Pride of Arabia Coffee at the CNE." The coffee was one of the first products to be blended and packaged at the warehouse. This photo was on display inside the northwest entrance of Loblaws at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W
2023 – The Loblaws Clock dated back to the 1930s and reads: “Loblaws Saves You Time & Money” and “Enjoy Loblaws Pride of Arabia Coffee at the CNE.” The coffee was one of the first products to be blended and packaged at the warehouse. This photo was on display inside the northwest entrance of Loblaws at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W
Between 1929 and 1930 - Looking west towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at Fleet St and Bathurst St, now 500 Lake Shore Blvd W in Toronto. Notice the Tip Top Tailors building in the background
Between 1929 and 1930 – Looking west towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at Fleet St and Bathurst St, now 500 Lake Shore Blvd W in Toronto. Notice the Tip Top Tailors building in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 3627)
June 4, 1931 - Looking south on Bathurst St towards streetcar track construction and the intersection of Lake Shore Blvd W and Fleet St. Notice the single and 4-storey Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building on the left and the former Maple Leaf Stadium in the background
June 4, 1931 – Looking south on Bathurst St towards streetcar track construction and the intersection of Lake Shore Blvd W and Fleet St. Notice the single and 4-storey Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building on the left and the former Maple Leaf Stadium in the background (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 3602)
2023 - Looking south down Bathurst St towards the intersection of Lake Shore Blvd W and Fleet St, in the CityPlace and Bathurst Quay neighbourhoods of Toronto. The Loblaw Groceteria building is on the left; however, the single-storey north portion of the warehouse has been replaced with a condo
2023 – Looking south down Bathurst St towards the intersection of Lake Shore Blvd W and Fleet St, in the CityPlace and Bathurst Quay neighbourhoods of Toronto. The Loblaw Groceteria building is on the left; however, the single-storey north portion of the warehouse has been replaced with a condo
June 8, 1934 - Looking southeast from Fort York towards Loblaw Groceterias building on the left and Maple Leaf Stadium on the right
June 8, 1934 – Looking southeast from Fort York towards Loblaw Groceterias building on the left and Maple Leaf Stadium on the right (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 602)
Between 1925 and 1935 - Billboard advertising for Loblaw Groceterias reads: "Make your motor car earn a salary - What we spend there, we save here" and "Self Serve - We Sell For Less - No Waiting"
Between 1925 and 1935 – Billboard advertising for Loblaw Groceterias reads: “Make your motor car earn a salary – What we spend there, we save here” and “Self Serve – We Sell For Less – No Waiting” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 1479)
Circa 1934 – An aerial view looking southeast towards Bathurst St, Fleet St and Lake Shore Blvd W. Along with the Loblaw Groceterias warehouse and head office, notice the Crosse & Blackwell building, Maple Leaf Stadium and Tip Top Tailors
Circa 1934 – An aerial view looking southeast towards Bathurst St, Fleet St and Lake Shore Blvd W. Along with the Loblaw Groceterias warehouse and head office, notice the Crosse & Blackwell building, Maple Leaf Stadium and Tip Top Tailors (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 7297)
January 10, 1936 – Looking northeast towards Loblaw Groceterias warehouse at Bathurst St and Fleet St, today 500 Lake Shore Blvd W. Notice in the background on the left the two-storey extension fronting Bathurst St, north of Housey St. It was constructed in 1934, and in more recent years, home to Amsterdam Brewery. The extension was demolished in 2013
January 10, 1936 – Looking northeast towards Loblaw Groceterias warehouse at Bathurst St and Fleet St, today 500 Lake Shore Blvd W. Notice in the background on the left the two-storey extension fronting Bathurst St, north of Housey St. It was constructed in 1934, and in more recent years, home to Amsterdam Brewery. The extension was demolished in 2013 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 3, Item 1390)
1960 - An aerial view looking east towards the Gardiner Expressway being constructed directly over the one-storey north portion of Loblaw Groceterias warehouse. Loblaws relocated their offices into the former Crosse & Blackwell building across the street (the building on the right). This photo was on display inside the south entrance of Loblaws at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W
1960 – An aerial view looking east towards the Gardiner Expressway being constructed directly over the one-storey north portion of Loblaw Groceterias warehouse. Loblaws relocated their offices into the former Crosse & Blackwell building across the street (the building on the right). This photo was on display inside the south entrance of Loblaws at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W
1960 – Looking south from Housey St at Bathurst St towards the General Merchandise Receiving entrance of Loblaw Groceterias warehouse. Notice the Art Deco-style stonework details on the single-storey structure. A portion of the Tip Top Tailors building is visible in the background on the right
1960 – Looking south from Housey St at Bathurst St towards the General Merchandise Receiving entrance of Loblaw Groceterias warehouse. Notice the Art Deco-style stonework details on the single-storey structure. A portion of the Tip Top Tailors building is visible in the background on the right (City of Toronto Archives, Series 65, File 158, Item 4)
1960 - Platform trucks filled with products inside the Loblaw Groceterias warehouse
1960 – Platform trucks filled with products inside the Loblaw Groceterias warehouse (City of Toronto Archives, Series 65, File 158, Item 31)
1960 - A truck backed into the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited warehouse
1960 – A truck backed into the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited warehouse (City of Toronto Archives, Series 65, File 158 Item 13)
1960 - Inside the Loblaw Groceterias warehouse. The boxes contain items like apple, orange and grapefruit juices, dog food, cellophane wrap and motor oil
1960 – Inside the Loblaw Groceterias warehouse. The boxes contain items like apple, orange and grapefruit juices, dog food, cellophane wrap and motor oil (City of Toronto Archives, Series 65, File 158 Item 8)
June 7, 1981 - Looking east from Fleet St towards Bathurst St. Notice the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building and CN Tower on the left and the Crosse & Blackwell building on the right
June 7, 1981 – Looking east from Fleet St towards Bathurst St. Notice the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building and CN Tower on the left and the Crosse & Blackwell building on the right (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 71, Item 104)
Between 1980 and 1983 - Looking northwest towards the Loblaw Groceterias warehouse from the south side of Lake Shore Blvd W
Between 1980 and 1983 – Looking northwest towards the Loblaw Groceterias warehouse from the south side of Lake Shore Blvd W (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1465, File 118, Item 116)
2021 - The Bathurst streetcar passing by Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W and Bathurst St, in Toronto's CityPlace neighbourhood
2021 – The Bathurst streetcar passing by Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W and Bathurst St, in Toronto’s CityPlace neighbourhood
2023 - The monumental entrance on the south side of Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W is flanked by decorative stone buttresses. They feature a locomotive and a ship which represent the company's commitment to sourcing quality products from around the world
2023 – The monumental entrance on the south side of Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W is flanked by decorative stone buttresses. They feature a locomotive and a ship which represent the company’s commitment to sourcing quality products from around the world
2023 - A few architectural details of the south side entrance of the Loblaw Groceterias building include rope moulding, glazed double doors and a bronze nameplate reading "LOBLAW GROCETERIAS CO. LIMITED." Notice the former Crosse & Blackwell building in the reflection. In 1949, the Loblaw Groceterias head office was relocated to that building
2023 – A few architectural details of the south side entrance of the Loblaw Groceterias building include rope moulding, glazed double doors and a bronze nameplate reading “LOBLAW GROCETERIAS CO. LIMITED.” Notice the former Crosse & Blackwell building in the reflection. In 1949, the Loblaw Groceterias head office was relocated to that building
2023 - Tile floor inside the south entrance of the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at Lake Shore Rd W and Bathurst St
2023 – Tile floor inside the south entrance of the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at Lake Shore Rd W and Bathurst St
2016 - Looking towards the empty lot at the northeast corner of Lake Shore Blvd W and Bathurst St. The original Loblaw Groceterias building was taken down in 2015. The exterior bricks and stone were numbered, restored and replaced on the new Loblaw Groceterias building at the West Block that opened in 2020
2016 – Looking towards the empty lot at the northeast corner of Lake Shore Blvd W and Bathurst St. The original Loblaw Groceterias building was taken down in 2015. The exterior bricks and stone were numbered, restored and replaced on the new Loblaw Groceterias building at the West Block that opened in 2020 (Google Maps)
2018 - Looking towards the northeast corner of Lake Shore Blvd W and Bathurst St during construction of the new Loblaw Groceterias building at the West Block in Toronto's CityPlace neighbourhood
2018 – Looking towards the northeast corner of Lake Shore Blvd W and Bathurst St during construction of the new Loblaw Groceterias building at the West Block in Toronto’s CityPlace neighbourhood (Google Maps)
2023 - Looking towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W in Toronto. Construction of the West Block began in the mid-2010s, and in 2020, the historic building reopened. It’s home to a Loblaws store, a Shoppers Drug Mart and a Joe Fresh clothing store. Sitting on top of the Art Deco building is a 5-storey glass and steel office annex. The West Block also features two condo towers. Notice the CN Tower in the distance
2023 – Looking towards the Loblaw Groceterias Company Limited building at 500 Lake Shore Blvd W in Toronto. Construction of the West Block began in the mid-2010s, and in 2020, the historic building reopened. It’s home to a Loblaws store, a Shoppers Drug Mart and a Joe Fresh clothing store. Sitting on top of the Art Deco building is a 5-storey glass and steel office annex. The West Block also features two condo towers. Notice the CN Tower in the distance
Circa 1919 - Loblaw Grocetarias store once at 511 Danforth Ave in the Greektown neighbourhood of Toronto
Circa 1919 – Loblaw Grocetarias store once at 511 Danforth Ave in the Greektown neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 1220)
Between 1920 and 1924 - Loblaw Grocetarias store once at 1182 Bloor St W in Toronto's Bloordale neighbourhood
Between 1920 and 1924 – Loblaw Grocetarias store once at 1182 Bloor St W in Toronto’s Bloordale neighbourhood (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1230, Item 1903)
January 16, 1935 - Loblaw Groceterias store once at 274 Eglinton Ave in Midtown Toronto. Notice Tamblyn Drugs a couple of doors down
January 16, 1935 – Loblaw Groceterias store once at 274 Eglinton Ave in Midtown Toronto. Notice Tamblyn Drugs a couple of doors down (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 207, Series 1254, Item 116)
September 15, 1936 - Looking north from the Jane St Loop towards shops and a Loblaw Groceterias store once at 2424 Bloor St W in the Bloor West Village of Toronto
September 15, 1936 – Looking north from the Jane St Loop towards shops and a Loblaw Groceterias store once at 2424 Bloor St W in the Bloor West Village of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 16, Series 71, Item 11565)
April 13, 1943 – Looking west on Bloor St W from Jane St in the Lambton Baby Point neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice the Lion Service Station selling gas at 18¢ a gallon, and in the distance, the Loblaws store once at 2450 Bloor St W
April 13, 1943 – Looking west on Bloor St W from Jane St in the Lambton Baby Point neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice the Lion Service Station selling gas at 18¢ a gallon, and in the distance, the Loblaws store once at 2450 Bloor St W (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 58, Item 1643)
1951 - Looking east on Dundas St W from Dufferin St in the Little Portugal neighbourhood. Notice the Loblaws store once at 1478 Dundas St W in the foreground on the left and Royal Theatre on the right
1951 – Looking east on Dundas St W from Dufferin St in the Little Portugal neighbourhood. Notice the Loblaws store once at 1478 Dundas St W in the foreground on the left and Royal Theatre on the right (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 115)
1955 - Looking north on Spadina Rd from south of Lonsdale Rd in the Forest Hill South neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice the Loblaws store on the right, once at 289 Spadina Rd
1955 – Looking north on Spadina Rd from south of Lonsdale Rd in the Forest Hill South neighbourhood of Toronto. Notice the Loblaws store on the right, once at 289 Spadina Rd (Toronto Public Library R-3811)
1958 - Loblaws store once at 3438 Yonge St in Toronto's Bedford Park neighbourhood
1958 – Loblaws store once at 3438 Yonge St in Toronto’s Bedford Park neighbourhood (CU110500612, by Panda Associates, Courtesy of Libraries and Cultural Resources Digital Collections, University of Calgary)
1950s - Looking south on Bathurst St from north of Glencairn Ave in Toronto's Englemount-Lawrence neighbourhood. Notice the Loblaws store once at 2795 Bathurst St on the left
1950s – Looking south on Bathurst St from north of Glencairn Ave in Toronto’s Englemount-Lawrence neighbourhood. Notice the Loblaws store once at 2795 Bathurst St on the left (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 5546)
1959 - Looking southwest towards a Loblaws store, once at 138 Avenue Rd, south of Davenport Rd in The Annex and Yorkville neighbourhoods of Toronto
1959 – Looking southwest towards a Loblaws store, once at 138 Avenue Rd, south of Davenport Rd in The Annex and Yorkville neighbourhoods of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Series 65, File 56, ID31)
September 19, 1960 - A Loblaws store once on Kennedy Rd in Toronto
September 19, 1960 – A Loblaws store once on Kennedy Rd in Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Series 65, File 160 Item 4)
April 27, 1971 - Looking northeast from Dundonald St towards the Loblaws store once at 539 Church St and Monteith St in Toronto's Church-Wellesley neighbourhood
April 27, 1971 – Looking northeast from Dundonald St towards the Loblaws store once at 539 Church St and Monteith St in Toronto’s Church-Wellesley neighbourhood (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1526, File 61, Item 78)
June 14, 1974 – Looking west towards the Loblaws store at 356-380 (today 396) St Clair Ave W, just east of Bathurst St in the Forest Hill South neighbourhood of Toronto
June 14, 1974 – Looking west towards the Loblaws store at 356-380 (today 396) St Clair Ave W, just east of Bathurst St in the Forest Hill South neighbourhood of Toronto (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 8398)
1921 - The Toronto City Directory showing the addresses of the Loblaw Groceteria Ltd stores
1921 – The Toronto City Directory showing the addresses of the Loblaw Groceteria Ltd stores (Toronto Public Library)
1916 - The Toronto City Directory showing the addresses of the T. P. Loblaw stores
1916 – The Toronto City Directory showing the addresses of the T. P. Loblaw stores (Toronto Public Library)
SOURCE
  • City of Toronto Heritage Register: 500 Lake Shore Blvd W
  • Ontario Heritage Trust: 500 Lake Shore Blvd W
  • Ontario Heritage Trust: Theodore Pringle Loblaw plaque
  • Canadian Grocer: May 30, 1919, Volume XXXIII, Number 22, pg 29
  • Canadian Grocer: Dec 26, 1919, Volume XXXIII, Number 52, pgs 28-29
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: Jan 27, 1928, pg 8
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Sep 14, 1929, pg 10
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Nov 9, 1929, pg 1
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: Jun 16, 1932, pg 4
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Apr 3, 1933, pg 1
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: Aug 10, 1934, pg 5
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Oct 2, 1947, pg 22
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Aug 14, 2015, pg G1 & G4
  • Loblaw: Who We Are
  • West Block
  • Merriam-Webster: Word History: Grocery’s Boozy History
  • Piggly Wiggly: History
  • Photos: Denise Marie for TorontoJourney416
  • Vintage Photos: City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Public Library & University of Calgary
  • Street Photo: Corner of Bathurst St at Lake Shore Blvd W from 2016 & 2018 Google Maps
  • Toronto City Directory by Might Directories Ltd 1916 & 1921 courtesy of Toronto Public Library

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