Hanlan’s Point Stadium – The Diamond Once at Toronto Island

1912 - Looking northwest towards Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan's Point on Toronto Island. The stadium once stood on a portion of today's Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport
1912 – Looking northwest towards Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan’s Point on Toronto Island. The stadium once stood on a portion of today’s Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport (Toronto Public Library PC-796)

The Hanlan’s Point Stadium, later known as Maple Leaf Park, was once located on a portion of where Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport stands today on Toronto Island.

Creating the Park

In the later part of the 1800s, Toronto Island became increasingly popular as a place for summer cottages and recreation. The owners of the Toronto Ferry Company saw the Island’s value and secured 2-acres of sand at the tip of Hanlan’s Point through a lease agreement with the city.

In 1894, the ferry company announced plans to fill in a long stretch of water along the western end of Hanlan’s Point to create a large park. Sand was pumped from the depths of Lake Ontario, and many tons of soil were transported from the city to reclaim 10 acres from the water. The stadium, which was part of the larger Hanlan’s Point Amusement Park, stood on the reclaimed land.

Initially a Cycling Track

The Toronto Ferry Company constructed a quarter-mile “wheel racing” track. The oval was 20 ft wide, had a concrete surface and was illuminated with 32 lights, so there were no shadows on any part of the circuit. A wooden grandstand was constructed around the track to accommodate about 2,500 fans. In June 1895, the Hanlan’s Point Stadium officially opened as a cycling track.

1905 - A baseball game at Hanlan's Point Stadium on Toronto Island
1905 – A baseball game at Hanlan’s Point Stadium on Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library E1-46C)

Toronto Baseball Club

In the mid-1890s, Arthur Irwin and a couple of Toronto business people purchased a baseball franchise from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, for the reported price of $2,500. They arranged with the Toronto Ferry Company to create a ball diamond at the new Hanlan’s Point Stadium and to transport fans to and from the Island. The stadium became home field to Toronto’s baseball team, an Eastern League (minors) ball club.

The diamond was laid inside the track with home plate in the southwest corner of the field and the third base line running parallel with the western side of Hanlan’s Point. The distance from the plate to the far fence was 146 m or 480 ft and was considered much further than even the heaviest hitter could smash the ball. The space outside the bases was sodded, and inside the lines was a smoothed surface made of a sandy mixture.

First Professional Baseball Game at Hanlan’s Point

On May 21, 1897, celebrating the city’s first Eastern League ball game on the Island, there was a carriage parade through the downtown city streets, honouring the Toronto and Rochester players. The Grenadiers Band lead the parade from the Grand Union Hotel, once at Front St W and Simcoe St to the Yonge St wharf. Players and officials set off for Hanlan’s Point. The Toronto Ferry Company had boats leaving every 10 minutes from Yonge St wharf and every 15 minutes from Brock St wharf.

That chilly afternoon, the first professional baseball game was played at Hanlan’s Point. In their home opener, Toronto lost against Rochester 11-10 in front of 2,000 cheering fans. Arthur Irwin, one of the team owners, was Toronto’s manager.

Some of the players on the team included John Frank “Buck” Freeman (RF), Bill Dinneen (P) and Dan McGann (1B), who all went on to have careers in Major League Baseball. Along with Toronto and Rochester, other teams in the international Eastern League included Buffalo, Springfield, Scranton, Syracuse, Wilkesbarre and Providence.

In June 1897 newspaper ads, General Admission to an afternoon championship baseball game with musical entertainment and an evening bicycle meet was 25¢, and grandstand seating was 10¢ extra. Admission for ladies was free except on Saturdays and holidays. Fans had to pay the Toronto Ferry Company for the boat ride to and from the Island.   

Tecumseh Lacrosse Club

1907 - The Tecumseh Lacrosse Club on their home field at Hanlan's Point Stadium on Toronto Island
1907 – The Tecumseh Lacrosse Club on their home field at Hanlan’s Point Stadium on Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library PC-3425)

Along with being home to Toronto’s Eastern League baseball club, Hanlan’s Point Stadium was also the home field of the Tecumseh Lacrosse Club.

The Tecumseh’s first game on the Island was on June 19, 1897. They defeated the Montreal La Nationale’s in front of 1,500 spectators.

The Move to Diamond Park

In 1899, the Toronto Ferry Company, whose main shareholder was Lawrence “Lol” Solman, purchased the Toronto baseball franchise. Just a year later, following the end of the 1900 season, the ferry company sold the team for $6,000 to a small group of business people.

In 1901, after four years at Hanlan’s Point, the Toronto ball club was moved to the new Diamond Park, once in the Liberty Village area at Liberty St and Fraser Ave, on the southeast corner. Hanlan’s Point Stadium remained the home field to the Tecumseh Lacrosse Club.

The 1903 Fire at Hanlan’s Point Stadium

In September 1903, there was an extensive fire at the athletic grounds on Hanlan’s Point. The Island’s volunteer firefighters did their best to battle the fire, but shifting winds and faulty equipment hampered their efforts. Firefighters from the mainland initially could not reach the Island quickly enough due to a lack of boats to carry them across the bay, but they finally made it to Toronto Island. The fire attracted crowds of people at the waterfront.

In the end, the blaze destroyed much of the stadium and a bar that housed several of Mr Solman’s collectibles, including the scull that Ned Hanlan (Lol’s brother-in-law) won the world championship in. Estimated losses at the time were $15,000. Mr Solman thought the fire could have been started in the dressing-rooms by a tossed lit cigar or match.

Toronto Maple Leafs Ball Club

The local newspapers had been referring to the baseball team as the “Torontos” or the “Canucks,” but in 1904, while still playing at Diamond Park, the team became known as the Toronto Maple Leafs. After the end of the 1904 season, the franchise was again sold to a new company called The Toronto Baseball and Amusement Co for $20,800. One of the company’s six directors was Lol Solman.

The Maple Leafs ball club returned to the rebuilt but still wooden Hanlan’s Point Stadium for the 1908 season. It was a “fast new diamond,” and the Toronto Ferry Company had three of their largest boats quickly ferrying fans to the Island.

Tom Longboat & Hanlan’s Point

Tom Longboat, an Onondaga born in 1887 at Six Nations of the Grand River, was one of the world’s greatest long-distance runners. In 1906, Tom was the winner of the 30 km Around the Bay road race (1:49:25), and in 1907, the Boston Marathon champion (2:24:24). The following year, he represented Canada in the Olympics.

Tom Longboat ran several races on the stadium track at Hanlan’s Point from 1907 to the early 1930s, including winning a 20-mile race against British-born Alfred Shrubb (2:03:10). A member of Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame, Tom Longboat passed away in 1949.

1909 - The grounds of Hanlan's Point amusement park and stadium on Toronto Island still smouldering after a devastating fire. The blaze destroyed Hotel Hanlan, the stadium and much of the amusement area
1909 – The grounds of Hanlan’s Point amusement park and stadium on Toronto Island still smouldering after a devastating fire. The blaze destroyed Hotel Hanlan, the stadium and much of the amusement area (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 6002)

The 1909 Fire at Hanlan’s Point

On August 10, 1909, there was another fire that was much worse than the blaze just six years prior. The fire started near the Gem Theatre building, just south of the stadium. It resulted from chemicals used at the theatre to create a red light for outside performances. By the time it was all over, one person had perished in the fire, Hotel Hanlan and the stadium were destroyed, and much of Hanlan’s Point Amusement Park was in ruins. Lack of proper fire protection and equipment was still an issue on the Island, along with low water pressure levels.

The place of merriment became a different kind of spectacle. The following day, thousands of curious visitors were ferried over to see the scene of the blaze and were surprised to find a band playing and the merry-go-round turning.

Mr Solman said he would rebuild a bigger, better amusement park and stadium. The Toronto Maple Leafs ball club temporarily moved back to Diamond Park while the new stadium was being constructed.

1923 - Opening day ball game at first base. The Toronto Maple Leafs lost 5-3 to Jersey City at Hanlan's Point, Toronto Island
1923 – Opening day ball game at first base. The Toronto Maple Leafs lost 5-3 to Jersey City at Hanlan’s Point, Toronto Island (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 583)

Maple Leaf Park

In May 1910, the new concrete and steel stadium opened at Hanlan’s Point. Toronto-born architect Charles F Wagner designed the 18,000-seat structure. Hanlan’s Point Stadium was now known as Maple Leaf Park. It was a cold and windy afternoon, but that didn’t keep 12,000 fans away. Admission to the games was priced at 25¢ and 50¢.

Babe Ruth & the Ball in the Bay

On September 5, 1914, the Toronto Maple Leafs had a home game against the Providence Grays. The Grays pitcher was the 19-year-old rookie George Herman “Babe” Ruth Jr. Ruth hit his first professional and only home run in the minors in that game. In a pitch from Ellis Johnson of the Leafs, Ruth sent the ball over the fence in right field, resulting in three runs. Babe Ruth only allowed one hit during the 9-inning game; the final score was Providence 9, Toronto 0. The Toronto Daily Star referred to Ruth as the “youthful southside phenom.” Babe Ruth quickly went to the majors.

On August 28, 1923, he was back at the Island Stadium playing for the New York Yankees in an exhibition game against the Leafs. During batting practice, excited fans saw Ruth hit a few balls into the bleachers and then wowed everyone when he hit the ball against the clock in centre field during fungo hitting.

But… during that game, Babe Ruth, the “Sultan of Swat,” hit a homer that soared high into the air and fell out of sight behind the bleacher wall into Toronto’s bay. That ball would be worth a fortune today. The Leafs took the win that game 8 to 2.

Demolition of the Stadium

For their 1926 season, the Toronto Maple Leafs moved to their new state-of-the-art home, Maple Leaf Stadium, at the foot of Bathurst St, south of Lake Shore Blvd W.

Back at Hanlan’s Point, Maple Leaf Park was still used for sports. In the mid-1930s, Hanlan’s Point amusement park, stadium, and several cottages (except for about 30 cottages that were moved to Algonquin Island) were demolished, and the regatta lagoon was filled in to make way for the Island Airport. In 1939, the Port George VI Island Airport officially opened. We know it today as the Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport.

1919 - An aerial view looking northwest towards Hanlan’s Point ferry docks, amusement park, stadium, the Western channel and the mainland. The area was redeveloped and became home to what we know today as Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport
1919 – An aerial view looking northwest towards Hanlan’s Point ferry docks, amusement park, stadium, the Western channel and the mainland. The area was redeveloped and became home to what we know today as Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport (Toronto Public Library R-3418)

Did You Know?

  • When the Toronto Ferry Company opened the Hanlan’s Point Amusement Park and Stadium in the 1890s, it was a summer resort. The company also relocated, improved, and operated the well-known Hotel Hanlan. The nearly 100-room hotel featured views of the lake, a dining room, parlours, and electric lighting, all in a peaceful island setting. The landmark hotel was lost in the 1909 fire.
  • In the early 1900s, Lol Solman and Ambrose Small worked together to put on a series of attractions at Hanlan’s Point. Mr Solman looked after the ferry service and Hotel Hanlan, while Mr Small managed the attractions. If the name Ambrose Small sounds familiar, he was the operator of the Grand Opera House and mysteriously disappeared in 1919. To this day, it’s still one of Toronto’s cold cases.
  • Charles F Wagner, the architect behind Maple Leaf Park stadium, also designed La Plaza Theatre, today known as The Opera House.
  • In 1911, the Tecumseh Lacrosse Club won the championship, and in a Labour Day game, there were 18,000 fans in attendance. The last advertised game for the Tecumseh’s was in 1915.
  • Lawrence “Sol” Solman was a leading business figure in Toronto’s amusement world. He was president of the Toronto Ball Club and operated Hanlan’s Point Amusement Park, the Toronto Ferry Company, and the Royal Alexandra Theatre. When Lawrence Solman passed away in 1931, sympathies came from theatrical and baseball communities across Canada and the United States. Thousands came to pay their respects, and his funeral service was held at St Andrew’s Church at King St W and Simcoe St.
  • The Toronto Maple Leafs ball club won a total of 11 pennants before folding in 1967.
  • What is fungo hitting? It’s when you hit the ball out of your own hand, either into the air or onto the ground. It is a skill used by coaches to facilitate the practice of fielding grounders and fly balls.

Hanlan’s Point Stadium Photos

1905 - A baseball game at Hanlan's Point Stadium on Toronto Island
1905 – A baseball game at Hanlan’s Point Stadium on Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library E1-46C)
1902 - Toronto Base Ball Club team photo
1902 – Toronto Base Ball Club team photo (Official Guide of the National Association of Professional Base Ball Leagues published by AG Spalding & Bros – 1903)
1905 - Hanlan's Point Stadium and Amusement Park. At the time, the stadium was the home field of the Tecumseh Lacrosse Club. The Toronto baseball club had moved to Diamond Park for a few years, from 1901 to 1907, before returning to Hanlan's Point on Toronto Island in 1908
1905 – Hanlan’s Point Stadium and Amusement Park. At the time, the stadium was the home field of the Tecumseh Lacrosse Club. The Toronto baseball club had moved to Diamond Park for a few years, from 1901 to 1907, before returning to Hanlan’s Point on Toronto Island in 1908 (Toronto Public Library PC-2227)
1907 - Tecumsehs and Shamrocks lacrosse game at Hanlan's Point Stadium, Toronto Island. In the background is The Dips rollercoaster
1907 – Tecumsehs and Shamrocks lacrosse game at Hanlan’s Point Stadium, Toronto Island. In the background is The Dips rollercoaster (Toronto Public Library PC-3424)
1907 - The Tecumseh Lacrosse Club on their home field at Hanlan's Point Stadium on Toronto Island
1907 – The Tecumseh Lacrosse Club on their home field at Hanlan’s Point Stadium on Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library PC-3425)
1907 - Tom Longboat standing beside his trophies. He was one of the world's greatest long-distance runners and ran several races at Hanlan's Point Stadium, later known as Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island
1907 – Tom Longboat standing beside his trophies. He was one of the world’s greatest long-distance runners and ran several races at Hanlan’s Point Stadium, later known as Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island (Library and Archives Canada 3192618)
1907 - Toronto sports heroes including Islanders Edward "Ned" Hanlan (standing on the left) and Eddie Durnan (standing in the middle). Lou Scholes (standing on the right) and Tom Longboat (seated on the right). The boy (seated) is Hanlan's son, Gordon. Ned Hanlan, Eddie Durnan and Lou Scholes were champion rowers, while Tom Longboat was a champion distance runner
1907 – Toronto sports heroes including Islanders Edward “Ned” Hanlan (standing on the left) and Eddie Durnan (standing in the middle). Lou Scholes (standing on the right) and Tom Longboat (seated on the right). The boy (seated) is Hanlan’s son, Gordon. Ned Hanlan, Eddie Durnan and Lou Scholes were champion rowers, while Tom Longboat was a champion distance runner (Toronto Public Library PC-3470)
1908 - Hanlan's Point Stadium on Toronto Island. The photo was taken from first base, looking towards second base and the outfield. This stadium was destroyed by a fire and replaced with Maple Leaf Park stadium in 1910
1908 – Hanlan’s Point Stadium on Toronto Island. The photo was taken from first base, looking towards second base and the outfield. This stadium was destroyed by a fire and replaced with Maple Leaf Park stadium in 1910 (City of Toronto Archives, Series 1231, File 4, Item 146)
1908 - Looking northwest towards the aerial swing at the Hanlan's Point Amusement Park and Stadium on Toronto Island
1908 – Looking northwest towards the aerial swing at the Hanlan’s Point Amusement Park and Stadium on Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library PC-783)
1909 - The grounds of Hanlan's Point amusement park and stadium on Toronto Island still smouldering after a devastating fire. The blaze destroyed Hotel Hanlan, the stadium and much of the amusement area
1909 – The grounds of Hanlan’s Point amusement park and stadium on Toronto Island still smouldering after a devastating fire. The blaze destroyed Hotel Hanlan, the stadium and much of the amusement area (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 6002)
1910 - Looking northwest towards Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan's Point on Toronto Island
1910 – Looking northwest towards Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan’s Point on Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library PC-3280)
1910 - The Toronto baseball team walking onto the field at Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island
1910 – The Toronto baseball team walking onto the field at Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 6046)
Circa 1910 - A plane flying over Hanlan's Point on Toronto Island. Behind the roller coaster is Maple Leaf Park stadium
Circa 1910 – A plane flying over Hanlan’s Point on Toronto Island. Behind the roller coaster is Maple Leaf Park stadium (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 4514)
1910 - The Tecumseh Lacrosse Club playing at Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island. Notice the banner by the sideline says "Longboat vs Shrubb - 12 miles - Aug 12 - 25¢"
1910 – The Tecumseh Lacrosse Club playing at Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island. Notice the banner by the sideline says “Longboat vs Shrubb – 12 miles – Aug 12 – 25¢” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 200)
1910 - A lacrosse game at Maple Leaf Park on Hanlan's Point, Toronto Island with the roller coaster as a backdrop
1910 – A lacrosse game at Maple Leaf Park on Hanlan’s Point, Toronto Island with the roller coaster as a backdrop (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 200B)
1910 - The police were called during a lacrosse game in Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan's Point, Toronto Island
1910 – The police were called during a lacrosse game in Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan’s Point, Toronto Island (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 200D)
1911 - Crowds watching a Toronto Maple Leafs baseball game at Hanlan's Point on Toronto Island
1911 – Crowds watching a Toronto Maple Leafs baseball game at Hanlan’s Point on Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library TSPA 0113897F)
1912 - Looking southeast towards a ball game at Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island. In the distance are the Hanlan's Point ferry docks and the merry-go-round. The stadium once stood on a portion of today's Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport
1912 – Looking southeast towards a ball game at Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island. In the distance are the Hanlan’s Point ferry docks and the merry-go-round. The stadium once stood on a portion of today’s Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport (Toronto Public Library PC-3422)
1912 - Looking northwest towards Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan's Point on Toronto Island. The stadium once stood on a portion of today's Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport
1912 – Looking northwest towards Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan’s Point on Toronto Island. The stadium once stood on a portion of today’s Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport (Toronto Public Library PC-796)
1919 - An aerial view looking northwest towards Hanlan’s Point ferry docks, amusement park, stadium, the Western channel, and the mainland. The area was redeveloped and became home to what we know today as Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport
1919 – An aerial view looking northwest towards Hanlan’s Point ferry docks, amusement park, stadium, the Western channel, and the mainland. The area was redeveloped and became home to what we know today as Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport (Toronto Public Library R-3418)
1919 - Looking south towards the roller coaster, bleachers and grandstand in Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island
1919 – Looking south towards the roller coaster, bleachers and grandstand in Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 17)
1919 - Under the bleachers at Maple Leaf Park on Hanlan's Point, Toronto Island
1919 – Under the bleachers at Maple Leaf Park on Hanlan’s Point, Toronto Island (City of Toronto Archives, Series 372, Sub Series 1, Item 325)
1919 - Looking southwest towards a baseball game, the bleachers and grandstand in Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan's Point, Toronto Island
1919 – Looking southwest towards a baseball game, the bleachers and grandstand in Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan’s Point, Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library PC-3281)
1923 - Opening day ball game at first base. The Toronto Maple Leafs lost 5-3 to Jersey City at Hanlan's Point, Toronto Island
1923 – Opening day ball game at first base. The Toronto Maple Leafs lost 5-3 to Jersey City at Hanlan’s Point, Toronto Island (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 583)
1890s - The Toronto Ferry Co taking passengers between the Yonge St wharf and Hanlan's Point on Toronto Island aboard the Mayflower ferry
1890s – The Toronto Ferry Co taking passengers between the Yonge St wharf and Hanlan’s Point on Toronto Island aboard the Mayflower ferry (Toronto Public Library E1-25R)
1924 - A crowd in the rain at the Toronto Ferry Co dock on the opening day of baseball. Ferries were transporting fans to the ball game at Maple Leaf Park on Hanlan's Point, Toronto Island
1924 – A crowd in the rain at the Toronto Ferry Co dock on the opening day of baseball. Ferries were transporting fans to the ball game at Maple Leaf Park on Hanlan’s Point, Toronto Island (City of Toronto Archives, Globe and Mail Fonds, Fonds 1266, Item 2488)
1927 - The SS Jasmine in Toronto bay beside Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan's Point, Toronto Island
1927 – The SS Jasmine in Toronto bay beside Maple Leaf Park at Hanlan’s Point, Toronto Island (Archives of Ontario I0014001)
1930/31 - Lawrence "Lol" Solman of the Toronto Ferry Company at his desk
1930/31 – Lawrence “Lol” Solman of the Toronto Ferry Company at his desk (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 4301)
1940 - An aerial view looking northeast towards the Toronto Island Airport, today's Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport. A portion of the airport was once home to Hanlan's Point Stadium, later known as Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island
1940 – An aerial view looking northeast towards the Toronto Island Airport, today’s Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport. A portion of the airport was once home to Hanlan’s Point Stadium, later known as Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library R-488)
2022 - A portion of Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport on Toronto Island was once home to Hanlan's Point Stadium/Maple Leaf Park. The building behind the fence is the Toronto Island Airport Terminal Building. Built in 1938/39, the wooden aviation terminal with a central control tower became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1989 and was decommissioned in 2010. In the distance are the Rogers Centre and the CN Tower.
2022 – A portion of Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport on Toronto Island was once home to Hanlan’s Point Stadium/Maple Leaf Park. The building behind the fence is the Toronto Island Airport Terminal Building. Built in 1938/39, the wooden aviation terminal with a central control tower became a National Historic Site of Canada in 1989 and was decommissioned in 2010. In the distance are the Rogers Centre and the CN Tower.
1890 - Goads Map showing the future location of Hanlan's Point Stadium, later known as Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island
1890 – Goads Map showing the future location of Hanlan’s Point Stadium, later known as Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library)
1912 - Goads Map showing the location of Hanlan's Point Stadium, later known as Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island
1912 – Goads Map showing the location of Hanlan’s Point Stadium, later known as Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library)
2022 - An aerial view of Hanlan's Point ferry docks, Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport, the Western Channel and Downtown Toronto. A portion of the airport was once home to Hanlan's Point Stadium, later known as Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island
2022 – An aerial view of Hanlan’s Point ferry docks, Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport, the Western Channel and Downtown Toronto. A portion of the airport was once home to Hanlan’s Point Stadium, later known as Maple Leaf Park on Toronto Island (Google Maps)
2022 - Babe Ruth at Hanlan's Point plaque is located 100 m west of the Hanlan's Point ferry docks on Toronto Island
2022 – Babe Ruth at Hanlan’s Point plaque is located 100 m west of the Hanlan’s Point ferry docks on Toronto Island
2022 - Professional Baseball at Hanlan's Point plaque is located 100 m west of the Hanlan's Point ferry docks on Toronto Island
2022 – Professional Baseball at Hanlan’s Point plaque is located 100 m west of the Hanlan’s Point ferry docks on Toronto Island
2022 - The site once home to the Hanlan's Point Stadium, later Maple Leaf Park, is located behind this tree line, on a portion of where Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport stands today. The Babe Ruth at Hanlan's Point and Professional Baseball at Hanlan's Point plaques are located in front of the tree line and 100 m west of the Hanlan's Point ferry docks on Toronto Island
2022 – The site once home to the Hanlan’s Point Stadium, later Maple Leaf Park, is located behind this tree line, on a portion of where Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport stands today. The Babe Ruth at Hanlan’s Point and Professional Baseball at Hanlan’s Point plaques are located in front of the tree line and 100 m west of the Hanlan’s Point ferry docks on Toronto Island
1909 - The Toronto City Directory showing the location of the Toronto Baseball Grounds on Toronto Island
1909 – The Toronto City Directory showing the location of the Toronto Baseball Grounds on Toronto Island (Toronto Public Library)
Early 1900s - The Toronto Maple Leafs baseball team moved to Diamond Park, once located at Liberty St and Fraser Ave in today's Liberty Village, from 1901 until 1907. They moved back to Toronto Island in 1908
Early 1900s – The Toronto Maple Leafs baseball team moved to Diamond Park, once located at Liberty St and Fraser Ave in today’s Liberty Village, from 1901 until 1907. They moved back to Toronto Island in 1908 (Toronto Public Library R-2470)
SOURCE
  • Heritage Toronto
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Mar 9, 1895, pg 17
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: May 29, 1895, pg 8
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Jul 6, 1895, pg 7
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Jul 12, 1895, pg 5
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Dec 11, 1896, pg 8
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Jan 12, 1897, pg 10
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: May 20, 1897, pg 10
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: May 22, 1897, pg 2
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Jun 19, 1897, pg 19
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Jun 21, 1897, pg 10
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Aug 4, 1899, pg 7
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: Nov 21, 1900, pg 6
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: Mar 26, 1901, pg 10
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: May 16, 1901, pg 8
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: Nov 9, 1904, pg 10
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Nov 29, 1904, pg 10
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: May 12, 1908, pg 7
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Jun 28, 1909, pg 9
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Aug 11, 1909, pg 1
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Aug 12, 1909, pg 1
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: May 9, 1910, pg 1
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: Sep 7, 1914, pg 3
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Sep 3, 1915, pg 9
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: May 3, 1923, pg 13
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Aug 29, 1923, pg 8
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: Aug 29, 1923, pg 13
  • The Toronto Daily Star Newspaper Archives: Jun 28, 1909, pg 9
  • More Than an Island – A History of the Toronto Island by Sally Gibson (1984)
  • Official Guide of the National Association of Professional Base Ball Leagues 1903 published by AG Spalding & Bros
  • BAA: Boston Marathon Champions
  • Bay Race: Around the Bay Road Race History
  • Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame: Tom Longboat
  • Photos: Denise Marie for TorontoJourney416
  • Vintage Photos: City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Public Library, Archives of Ontario & Library and Archives Canada
  • Street Photo: Google Maps
  • Vintage Map: Atlas of the City of Toronto 1890 & 1912 by Chas E Goad courtesy of Toronto Public Library
  • Toronto City Directory by Might Directories Ltd 1909 courtesy of Toronto Public Library