Grand Opera House & the Century-Old Cold Case of the Missing Magnate

1921 - Looking southwest towards the Grand Opera House once at 11 Adelaide St W
1921 – Looking southwest towards the Grand Opera House once at 11 Adelaide St W (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 843)

The magnificent Grand Opera House was once located at 11 Adelaide St W (between Grand Opera Lane and Bay St, on the south side) in downtown Toronto.

Toronto’s Early Theatre History

One of the city’s early theatres was the Royal Lyceum, which once stood on the south side of King St W, between York St and Bay St. Built in 1848/49, it was one of Toronto’s first buildings constructed specifically for theatre use. The Royal Lyceum was destroyed by fire in January 1874.

Shortly after the blaze, a group called the Toronto Opera House Company formed. They asked Charlotte Morrison, the former Royal Lyceum Theatre manager, to manage the new Grand Opera House and create a theatrical performance company.

The Grand Opera House Architecture

Renowned theatre architect Thomas R Jackson of New York City was hired to design the Grand Opera House. Located at what was known then as 9-15 Adelaide St W, the exterior of the Second Empire-style theatre was constructed using brick and stone. Stacked like the tiers of a wedding cake, the front block of the 3½-storey structure hid the back portion of the building that housed the auditorium, stage and fly tower.

The front piece was home to rented shops on the main level, with offices and apartments on the upper floors. The theatre’s entrance was an elaborate arched portal with decorative windows on each floor. The symmetrical building also featured a mansard roof, tower and flanking end pavilions. Dormers livened the roofline while a royal coat of arms and a flagpole were on the top of the centre tower. For fire safety, Mr Jackson equipped the stage with two hydrants, plus the auditorium had fire escapes that could allow the theatre to empty within two minutes.

The Theatre’s Elegant Interior

Once inside, patrons walked through a 15 m or 50 ft corridor to the main lobby and box office. This area led to the 1,323-seat, domed auditorium. In the orchestra and balconies, theatre-goers sat on folding chairs while those in the plush Dress Circle and boxes sat on armchairs. Standing room and folding stools could accommodate another 500 guests. The stage was relatively large (16 x 20 m or 53 x 65 ft) and approximately two-thirds the size of the auditorium. The orchestra played from a sunken pit.

The beautiful building was heated by steam. The gas-lit chandelier over the auditorium dome, wall sconces and other chandeliers were turned on by an electrical spark.

The First Five Years & the Fire

For the gala performance in 1874, Mrs Morrison, who was also an actress, came out of retirement to tread the boards as Lady Teazle in The School for Scandal.

Even though the Grand Opera House was a centre for elite social activities and attracted significant international acts, the elegant theatre was in financial trouble. It was sold at auction just two years after opening to Alexander Manning.

On a November morning in 1879, the theatre was destroyed by fire. Even though there were fire escapes and hydrants, the theatre’s stage carpenter and his wife and daughter, who lived on an upper floor in the northwest corner of the Grand proper, perished in the fire. A week later, an inquest into the fire concluded, and within days, the rebuilding of the theatre began.

The Grand’s Reconstruction

While the blaze had not destroyed the exterior walls of the theatre, the interior required significant work. The architectural firm of Lalor & Martin was hired to rebuild the theatre. Completed in February 1880, the interior of the Grand Opera House was virtually the same as Mr Jackson’s design; however, the seating capacity was increased to 1,750. The re-opening night was a production of Romeo and Juliet.

The Disappearance of Ambrose Small

1920 – The missing poster of Ambrose J Small, owner of the Grand Opera House
1920 – The missing poster of Ambrose J Small, owner of the Grand Opera House (Toronto Police Museum and Discovery Centre)

Ambrose Small, a theatre magnate, took over the Grand Opera House around the turn of the 20th century. One of Toronto’s unsolved mysteries is his disappearance. On Dec 2, 1919, Mr Small closed a deal, selling his theatre holdings, including the Grand, for $1.75 million. That day, Mr Small’s wife, Theresa, deposited a cheque for $1 million into the Dominion Bank. The couple had a celebration lunch with their lawyer, Mr Flock, and then Mr Small returned to his office at the Grand.

Later that afternoon, Ambrose Small again met with his lawyer for about an hour, and then his lawyer left to catch a train back to his hometown of London, Ontario. Mr Small then went out to buy a copy of a New York newspaper and was never seen again. His wife thought he could be with his mistress, plus he was known to leave the city without informing anyone. Toronto Police were not made aware that Mr Small was missing until about four weeks later.

At that same time of his disappearance, his personal secretary, John Doughty, also went missing along with $105,000 in Dominion of Canada Victory bonds taken from his employer’s safety deposit box. Police caught up with Mr Doughty at a lumber camp in Oregon. He was brought back to Toronto, where he was questioned about his boss’s disappearance. Without proof that Mr Small was dead, Mr Doughty could not be charged. However, he was found guilty of theft and served under five years in jail.

The Final Curtain

Plays at the Grand Opera House continued in the 1920s. Still, due to the disappearance of Mr Small, the growing popularity of motion pictures and competition from other live theatres, including the Royal Alex, the theatre closed. In 1928, stage settings and mementos from the visits of famous stars were removed from the Grand, and it was then demolished.

In 1960, the diligent Toronto Police Service officially closed the 3-foot thick file. It contained information on leads taking them across North America, numerous tips (including those from clairvoyants), and the keys to the long-ago demolished Grand Opera House.

The case remains unsolved to this day, and Ambrose Small’s disappearance eclipses the theatrical and architectural history of the Grand.

The John Kay, Son & Company/Wood Gundy Facade

August 8, 2020 - The property the Grand Opera House, once occupied at 11 Adelaide St W, is now part of the Scotia Plaza with the facade of the John Kay, Son & Company/Wood Gundy building, once at 36-38 King St W
August 8, 2020 – The property the Grand Opera House, once occupied at 11 Adelaide St W, is now part of the Scotia Plaza with the facade of the John Kay, Son & Company/Wood Gundy building, once at 36-38 King St W

So why does the building on the former Grand Opera House site have a building inscribed with the year 1898 when the theatre was at that location during that year? Today, the site is part of the larger Scotia Plaza, bounded by Adelaide, Yonge, King and Bay Sts. At the location of the Grand Opera House is a new office building constructed in the late 1980s. The right half of the 5-storey structure has a façade that was relocated here from the John Kay, Son & Company store and later Wood Gundy office building that was once at 36-38 King St W.

Moving the façade from King St W to this building on Adelaide St W was part of the approval of the Scotia Plaza development. The John Kay, Son & Company façade was initially constructed in 1898. When Wood Gundy took over the building, they inscribed their name over the main entrance and inscriptions over the flanking doors. The first two stories are carved of limestone, and the three upper stories are delicate terra-cotta. Completed in 1988, the move was an enormous task as there were over 1500 pieces, each weighing roughly 45 kg or 100 lbs.

Did You Know?

  • “Treading the boards” or “trodden the boards” is a theatrical term meaning to act on stage.
  • The Fly Tower is the area above the stage. When the Grand was built, the stage crew used this area to fly curtains, scenery, lighting, effects and even actors on and off the stage. They used a system of hemp rope, pulleys and sandbags to perform the tasks quickly and quietly.
  • Adelaide St W was once known as Newgate St.
  • In 1923, the reward for finding Ambrose Small was $50,000. His disappearance then became international news, with sightings of him reported in the United States and Mexico.
  • When Mrs Small died in 1935, she left $2 million to charity. She was also the daughter of the Toronto brewing family, Kormann.
  • When the Grand Opera House was demolished in 1928, the site initially became a Straight Service gas station and then a parking lot. In the late 1950s, an office building with space for the Board of Trade was constructed there. It was torn down for the present-day building that’s part of Scotia Plaza.
  • Today, the only remnants of the stunning theatre that once stood there is the street name – Grand Opera Lane.

Grand Opera House Photos

Between 1885 and 1895 - Looking east toward the former Grand Opera House once at 9-15 Adelaide St W
Between 1885 and 1895 – Looking east toward the former Grand Opera House once at 9-15 Adelaide St W (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1478, Item 26)
1921 - Looking southwest towards the Grand Opera House once at 11 Adelaide St W
1921 – Looking southwest towards the Grand Opera House once at 11 Adelaide St W (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, Item 843)
1920 – The missing poster of Ambrose J Small, owner of the Grand Opera House
1920 – The missing poster of Ambrose J Small, owner of the Grand Opera House (Toronto Police Museum and Discovery Centre)
October 1, 1928 – This missing person alert was issued by the Toronto police in 1928. Ambrose J Small, the owner of the Grand Opera House, had been had not been seen since December 2, 1919
October 1, 1928 – This missing person alert was issued by the Toronto police in 1928. Ambrose J Small, the owner of the Grand Opera House, had been had not been seen since December 2, 1919 (Toronto Police Museum and Discovery Centre)
1952 – Ambrose Small, the owner of the Grand Opera House, once lived in the Rosedale-Moore Park neighbourhood (Toronto Public Library R-3770)
1952 – Ambrose Small, the owner of the Grand Opera House, once lived in the Rosedale-Moore Park neighbourhood (Toronto Public Library R-3770)
June 19, 2021 - Looking east along Adelaide St W towards Grand Opera Lane, just west of Yonge St, where the Grand Opera House once stood
June 19, 2021 – Looking east along Adelaide St W towards Grand Opera Lane, just west of Yonge St, where the Grand Opera House once stood
November 20, 2021 - Grand Opera Lane street sign on the south side of Adelaide St W, between Yonge St and Bay St
November 20, 2021 – Grand Opera Lane street sign on the south side of Adelaide St W, between Yonge St and Bay St
1956 - Looking east along Adelaide St W from west of then Johnson St. In the photo, a parking lot occupies the property that was once the site of the Grand Opera House
1956 – Looking east along Adelaide St W from west of then Johnson St. In the photo, a parking lot occupies the property that was once the site of the Grand Opera House (Toronto Public Library R-5910)
1924 - Grand Opera House from 1874 to 1927 once at 11 Adelaide St W west of Yonge St
1924 – Grand Opera House from 1874 to 1927 once at 11 Adelaide St W west of Yonge St (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 7069)
April 28, 1924 - Mrs Theresa Small, wife of missing Ambrose Small, owner of the Grand Opera House
April 28, 1924 – Mrs Theresa Small, wife of missing Ambrose Small, owner of the Grand Opera House (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1266, Item 2482)
1924 - A production of “The Fool” playing at the Grand Opera House
1924 – A production of “The Fool” playing at the Grand Opera House (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 1529)
1924 - A production of author Channing Pollock's "The Fool" playing at the Grand Opera House
1924 – A production of author Channing Pollock’s “The Fool” playing at the Grand Opera House (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 1989)
1923 - A billboard on Broadview Ave for Abie's Irish Rose playing at the Grand Opera House. Notice the Broadview Cigar Store and Broadview Music Store, at 353 and 355 Broadview Ave. All the buildings in the photos still stand today
1923 – A billboard on Broadview Ave for Abie’s Irish Rose playing at the Grand Opera House. Notice the Broadview Cigar Store and Broadview Music Store, at 353 and 355 Broadview Ave. All the buildings in the photos still stand today (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 1600)
1928 – Looking towards the main entrance of the Grand Opera House. On the marquee, "Abie's Irish Rose," starring Anne Nichols, was playing
1928 – Looking towards the main entrance of the Grand Opera House. On the marquee, “Abie’s Irish Rose,” starring Anne Nichols, was playing (Library and Archives Canada a049673)
1920 - Looking southeast along Adelaide St W towards the Grand Opera House
1920 – Looking southeast along Adelaide St W towards the Grand Opera House (Archives of Ontario I0021963)
Between 1920 and 1926 – The entrance of the Grand Opera House advertising a production of the Original Dumbells (a Vaudeville troupe) in "Stepping Out"
Between 1920 and 1926 – The entrance of the Grand Opera House advertising a production of the Original Dumbells (a Vaudeville troupe) in “Stepping Out” (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1488, Series 1230, Item 2576)
1912 - Goads Map showing the location of the Grand Opera House
1912 – Goads Map showing the location of the Grand Opera House (Toronto Public Library)
1899 - The Toronto City Directory showing the address of the Grand Opera House
1899 – The Toronto City Directory showing the address of the Grand Opera House (Toronto Public Library)
Between 1885 and 1900 – The front and back of a Grand Opera House door check ticket
Between 1885 and 1900 – The front and back of a Grand Opera House door check ticket (Toronto Public Library)
1875 - During a performance of The Messiah at the Grand Opera House
1875 – During a performance of The Messiah at the Grand Opera House (Library and Archives Canada/Canadian Illustrated News 62531)
1874 - The Grand Opera House, before the fire, at 9-15 Adelaide St W
1874 – The Grand Opera House, before the fire, at 9-15 Adelaide St W (Library and Archives Canada/Canadian Illustrated News 61396)
September 1988 – Looking southwest towards the property the Grand Opera House, once occupied at 11 Adelaide St W. The site of the former theatre is now part of Scotia Plaza. It features the facade of the John Kay, Son & Company/Wood Gundy building, which was once at 36-38 King St W
September 1988 – Looking southwest towards the property the Grand Opera House, once occupied at 11 Adelaide St W. The site of the former theatre is now part of Scotia Plaza. It features the facade of the John Kay, Son & Company/Wood Gundy building, which was once at 36-38 King St W (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 124, File 3, ID 168)
August 8, 2020 - The property the Grand Opera House, once occupied at 11 Adelaide St W, is now part of the Scotia Plaza with the facade of the John Kay, Son & Company/Wood Gundy building, once at 36-38 King St W
August 8, 2020 – The property the Grand Opera House, once occupied at 11 Adelaide St W, is now part of the Scotia Plaza with the facade of the John Kay, Son & Company/Wood Gundy building, once at 36-38 King St W
SOURCE
  • Lost Toronto by William Dendy
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Dec 1, 1879, page 2
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Dec 2, 1879, page 4
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Dec 23, 1919, page 8
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Nov 30, 1920, page 1
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Dec 31, 1920, page 1
  • The Globe Newspaper Archives: Jun 22, 1928, page 13
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Dec 23, 1955, page 5
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Feb 21, 1970, page A13
  • The Globe and Mail Newspaper Archives: Nov 7, 1974, page 13
  • Toronto Star Newspaper Archives: Aug 20, 1984, page B10
  • Photos: Denise Marie for TorontoJourney416
  • Vintage Photos: City of Toronto Archives, Toronto Public Library, Archives of Ontario, Library and Archives Canada & Toronto Police Museum and Discovery Centre
  • Toronto City Directory by Might Directories Ltd 1899 courtesy of Toronto Public Library
  • Vintage Map: Atlas of the City of Toronto 1912 by Chas E Goad from the Toronto Public Library