First Evangelical Lutheran Church – Built in 1898

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First Evangelical Lutheran Church is located at 116 Bond St (north of Dundas St E on the west side) in the Garden District in downtown Toronto.

Built in 1898 by German immigrants, architect Charles Wagner designed the Lutheran church in the Modern Gothic style. It replaced the previous church structure that had stood on the site for over 40 years. Nearly all the materials used to construct the new church were repurposed from the old church. Because of that, the new church, including the furniture, cost $4,400.

The exterior of the new church features stucco walls, a corner tower, buttresses and elongated windows. When first built, the church could accommodate 250 worshippers.

First Evangelical Lutheran Church received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 1973.

First Evangelical Lutheran Church Photos  

2021 - First Evangelical Lutheran Church is located at 116 Bond St, north of Dundas St E, in the Garden District in downtown Toronto
2021 – First Evangelical Lutheran Church is located at 116 Bond St, north of Dundas St E, in the Garden District in downtown Toronto
1956 – Looking southwest towards First Evangelical Lutheran Church at 116 Bond St. The church was built in 1898
1956 – Looking southwest towards First Evangelical Lutheran Church at 116 Bond St. The church was built in 1898 (Toronto Public Library R-3540)
2020 - First Evangelical Lutheran Church at 116 Bond St was designed by architect Charles Wagner and features stucco walls, a tower, buttresses and elongated windows
2020 – First Evangelical Lutheran Church at 116 Bond St was designed by architect Charles Wagner and features stucco walls, a tower, buttresses and elongated windows
2020 – Looking west towards the front of First Evangelical Lutheran Church on Bond St, north of Dundas St E. The Modern Gothic-style church received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 1973
2020 – Looking west towards the front of First Evangelical Lutheran Church on Bond St, north of Dundas St E. The Modern Gothic-style church received heritage status from the City of Toronto in 1973
2020 – The  plaque reads: 

The Centennial Anniversary
1898 - 1998

"This house of worship was erected in 1898 by German immigrants to the Toronto area. This small congregation, founded in 1851, was determined to have their own church and to use German as the language of service to the Glory of God. With God’s help, this has been realized for over a century. The current members are greatly indebted to their ancestors who gave this lovely building for worship and for showing the way to be faithful and grateful to the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ."
2020 – The plaque reads:

The Centennial Anniversary 1898 – 1998

“This house of worship was erected in 1898 by German immigrants to the Toronto area. This small congregation, founded in 1851, was determined to have their own church and to use German as the language of service to the Glory of God. With God’s help, this has been realized for over a century. The current members are greatly indebted to their ancestors who gave this lovely building for worship and for showing the way to be faithful and grateful to the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.”
Sketch of the German Evangelical Church (Lutheran) that once occupied 116 Bond St. It was replaced in 1898 by the present-day church
Sketch of the German Evangelical Church (Lutheran) that once occupied 116 Bond St. It was replaced in 1898 by the present-day church (Landmarks of Toronto Volume 4 by J Ross Robertson – 1904)
Sketch of the present-day First Evangelical Lutheran Church building at 116 Bond St
Sketch of the present-day First Evangelical Lutheran Church building at 116 Bond St (Landmarks of Toronto Volume 4 by J Ross Robertson – 1904)
2020 – Main entrance and corner tower at First Evangelical Lutheran Church
2020 – Main entrance and corner tower at First Evangelical Lutheran Church
SOURCE  
  • City of Toronto Heritage Register: 116 Bond St
  • Landmarks of Toronto: Volume 4 by J Ross Robertson (1904), pgs 550-556
  • Toronto Architecture: A City Guide by Patricia McHugh and Alex Bozikovic (2017), pg 163
  • Photos: Denise Marie for TorontoJourney416
  • Vintage Photos: Toronto Public Library

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